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  • Hello.

  • Hi, everybody.

  • It's me, Elliot from E.

  • T.

  • J English.

  • Welcome to another British English British Pronunciation lesson where today we are talking about food.

  • Probably one of the biggest parts of my life at the moment not being able to go outside and do things My mind is always thinking.

  • What food am I going to eat next?

  • What will I cook next?

  • What food will I order?

  • Which restaurant will I order from next?

  • So it made me think perhaps I should make a lesson where we build some vocabulary, some idioms and expressions phrase all verbs all around the topic of food and eating and drinking.

  • I thought the best place to start was the difference between eat out and eat in.

  • For many of you, this is probably very simple.

  • But when we eat out, that's when we go to a restaurant.

  • Okay, we leave the house to eat, we eat out outside of the house.

  • And of course, the opposite eats in means to have dinner at home, remember?

  • Eat in could also mean to have a takeaway.

  • So not just to cook at home, but to have a takeaway.

  • A take away.

  • Traditionally means to order something on the phone, and then we would pick it up, collect it and take it home.

  • However, we often now even say take away when talking about delivery from companies like delivery or uber eats that we could still call or take away.

  • Remember that Americans tend to say, take out to get a take out in the UK we say take away.

  • So let's say I'm talking to my partner and she says to me, Elliot, should we eat in tonight?

  • So shall we eat in tonight?

  • Yeah, sure.

  • Do you fancy an Indian?

  • Yeah, sure.

  • Do you fancy an Indian?

  • How fancy has many meanings.

  • Fancy can mean to find someone attractive, but I don't think I'm asking my girlfriend.

  • Do you find this Indian man attractive instead?

  • I am saying, do you fancy an Indian meal?

  • We can also say, Do you fancy a pizza?

  • Do you fancy Chinese tonight?

  • Okay, so do you.

  • Fancy is a way of saying Do you want So do you fancy this tonight?

  • What do you fancy?

  • That's like saying What do you want?

  • But when we eat out and we go to a restaurant, we could go to a fancy restaurant, a posh restaurant.

  • If a restaurant is fancy, then we probably need to dress smart and it's probably very expensive.

  • Or we could go to a chain, for example, a company which has multiple restaurants all over the world all over the city, as well as having a take away at home.

  • We don't just have to have a takeaway.

  • Of course.

  • We can cook our own food, our own meal, and there are multiple things we could say.

  • Let's start with the small things first you could invite at the moment you can't, but in the future you could invite some friends round for some nibbles, for example, I could say on the phone to my friend, Do you want to come around for some nibbles tonight and watch the rugby?

  • So nibbles are generally something you would have to eat when you are watching TV?

  • Perhaps there's a big event on like the rugby, and you would sit together and watch it and eat nibbles, so this would be things like crisps.

  • Remember, Americans say chips, maybe some dips, some bread, hummus.

  • You know these kinds of things, these kind of nibble we call it Nibali food or nibbles.

  • Small bits of food that we can snack on while we watch something.

  • So do you want to come around for some nibbles and drinks, maybe even small sandwiches that you could make for people who come around?

  • But let's say we are having a proper meal and it's a family meal.

  • We have all of our family together, and let's say I am hosting this meal.

  • So it's my house and my family have come around.

  • The first thing I'd want to do while I'm cooking and getting things ready would be to lay the table.

  • To lay the table would be to put everything on the table.

  • So of course, we have things like plates, bowls.

  • We also have what we call cutlery.

  • Cutlery.

  • This is knife, fork, spoon.

  • Okay, the things we used to eat we also have placemats.

  • Placemats are the square mats or the rectangular mats that we put the plates on to protect the table.

  • And also we have the same thing for cups, right?

  • We put a cup on something, and this is called a coaster coaster, so we have coaster placemat, cutlery.

  • Usually it's kind of a tradition.

  • I don't know if it's the same in your country.

  • Some countries.

  • It is some countries.

  • It isn't from my experience where we wait until everybody has their food and then we begin.

  • So maybe before we all start eating, the host might want to say something to encourage everybody to start eating.

  • The most common thing to say is probably tuck in, tuck in, tuck in notice, my connected speech.

  • I'm not saying Tuck in.

  • I'm saying Tuck in.

  • The words are joining together.

  • Tuck in.

  • So this just means go start eating.

  • Another common one is dig in, dig in again, connecting my speech.

  • Dig in, dig in, dig in or one which my dad uses a lot whenever I go to their house to eat, which is Come on, guys, get stuck in, get stuck in.

  • I love this one.

  • To get stuck in just means get going.

  • Begin, start.

  • Let's go.

  • It's like saying do it with energy so we could say this to everyone before we start eating.

  • But we could also say about maybe beginning a project.

  • Maybe we have an important project to do, and we just we just need to get stuck in Get started.

  • Go now when I get stuck in to my food, I'm a fast eater, and what I tend to do is I scoff.

  • My food scoff.

  • Scoff, so to scoff.

  • Your food means to eat it really fast as a slang word people use, which would be to inhale your food.

  • Maybe your friend ate that dinner really, really fast.

  • You could say to them, God, you inhaled that To inhale is to to breathe in.

  • So it's like he's just breathing in and all the food is flying down into his mouth.

  • But if somebody is eating very slowly, so the opposite of scoffing their face, maybe you have a child who eats a bit slowly and generally will say this to a child who's eating slowly.

  • If we want them to eat their vegetables, we might say, Come on, eat up, eat up meaning Keep going, eat, eat, eat.

  • It's like encouraging them to eat because you've noticed that they're not eating, and we're encouraging them to eat more seconds.

  • Seconds.

  • I love seconds.

  • So when you finish your dinner, one of my favorite things to do is to go and see if there are any seconds, or if I can have any seconds, which is basically when you go back up, you take your food and you fill up your plate again and have a second serving.

  • We call it seconds difficult to pronounce this one seconds.

  • It's that Schwab sound at the end of guns, and I got this question the other day on Instagram.

  • Somebody said to me, Elliot, British people say dessert.

  • Or do they say pudding?

  • To be honest, you can say either there are kind of backgrounds and traditions as to you'd say pudding about this type of food.

  • But you'd say Desert about this type of food.

  • If you want my complete honesty, I don't say pudding.

  • I just say dessert.

  • I'd say What's for dessert?

  • I wouldn't say What's what's for pudding or what putting do we have?

  • I call it dessert, but in modern English, it's really fine just to say either.

  • So just pick the one you like the sound of the most really now another good one is when we want to check, everybody is finished Now we could say, Is everybody finished?

  • Okay?

  • Or you can just say the word finished But we don't just say finished, because that sounds like I'm just telling my listener that I have finished finished.

  • Instead, we need to say finished, Furnished, furnished.

  • Okay, so this intonation Mm.

  • It's kind of rising intonation.

  • It shows that we're asking a question.

  • Okay.

  • So you can see how we can change the meaning of a word by changing the Internation.

  • Finished.

  • And this makes it sound like we're asking everybody or the person next to us.

  • Have you finished eating?

  • We've laid the table, and now we need to clear the table.

  • Clear.

  • This word is lovely ear at the end.

  • Don't add an R if you want to.

  • British accent, it's just clear.

  • Clear.

  • Clear the table.

  • Now we're going to take a step away from food, which is going to quickly talk about drink because drink, whether it's alcoholic or non alcoholic, we all need it.

  • So we need to know maybe some useful expressions.

  • I'll start from sipping to sip on a drink means to take small sips very slowly.

  • Right, sip.

  • So I'm sipping on a drink, Meaning I'm taking my time with it.

  • But you could chug a drink.

  • Ultra chug.

  • Really quickly drink when people are drinking like partying and then playing drinking games.

  • If someone is chugging a drink, people might cheer them and they might say down it right down it, down it, Drink it fast down it like tip it upside down.

  • Finally one for the road Natural pronunciation one for the road for the notice.

  • How I do for those two words are not important their function words So we say them quickly for the for the for the road, one for the road.

  • To have one for the road means to have one more drink before we go home before we finish to have one for the road And that is about all I have for today.

  • Now I want you to share anything you want to share about food.

  • Maybe some expressions and things I've mentioned today are similar in your language.

  • Please write them in the comments below.

  • Or maybe you have some more you'd like to add to this list.

  • Of course, I can talk about flavors in the future describing the taste of things.

  • If this is something you'd like, please let me know And I will create a video about that let me know in the comments.

  • Don't forget.

  • If you want to work towards a British pronunciation and modern RP pronunciation just like mine, you can work with me through WhatsApp and my online course, which you can join at e t j english dot com.

  • And of course, if you enjoyed this lesson, I have loads of more videos.

  • Please feel free to watch them.

  • And don't forget to give me a thumbs up and subscribe again.

  • As always, it's been a pleasure.

  • I will see you next time.

  • Cheers, guys.

  • Bye.

Hello.

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A2 fancy eating tuck drink finished table

Eating and Drinking: British Expressions, Vocab and Pronunciation

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/03/06
Video vocabulary