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  • This is day two of the wolf prep,

  • um, this is the wolf that we got, it was hit by a car.

  • The reason we moved him underneath the fume hood today

  • is because he's got a little bit of gas in here.

  • I got this scalpel and we're gonna try and release the gases today.

  • And hope that I don't vomit.

  • Okay.

  • Oh my god.

  • Oh, I've never done anything like this before.

  • (exhales) Here we go.

  • Okay, it's in the body.

  • Yeah, you can hear the gases being released.

  • I can't smell anything yet.

  • So he's starting to deflate a little bit.

  • I don't know. Did that do it?

  • Was that it?

  • That was a little anticlimactic!

  • I can't smell anything. I can't -

  • I could...

  • I think we're good.

  • Woo!

  • We're gonna have to grab the tray.

  • I gotta grab his head too, though.

  • You can let the head hang. - I wish I had three arms.

  • Okay. Here we go.

  • Ugh. He still smells. - Oh god.

  • Oh, there we go.

  • Oh my god!

  • I don't - I don't wanna do this, you guys!

  • I think it's worse when you like lift him up.

  • I think it's, like, in his groin areas where this is bad.

  • Maybe I should've made another cut down there.

  • 'Cause you can see on here, all of his guts are just like,

  • gravity is pulling them down there.

  • Oh, man. Oh.

  • That's ripe.

  • That is rich.

  • Well. (Gags) Oh.

  • Where should we start?

  • I mean if you throw up at this point you'll probably throw up in your face mask, but...

  • Just keep our barf bags handy.

  • We don't have enough space to store his entire body

  • in a freezer as a whole unit, so we're gonna

  • remove his head, we're gonna cut off the limbs, scapula,

  • humerus down, remove the legs which I think might be the worst bit of it.

  • So let's start with the head.

  • And work towards the gross.

  • Okay, so you have C1 and C2,

  • they're called the atlas and the axis.

  • You think about it this way,

  • is the, um, atlas, you know, supports the world

  • a.k.a. the head on his shoulders

  • and the axis is what the world turns on.

  • So it's an easy way to remember those two.

  • Atlas, axis, and then you have about 5 other ones,

  • that connect to the,

  • uh, thoracic and then the lumbar vertebrae.

  • So I'm just gonna, kinda guesstimate where that last,

  • that last cervical is and cut into the muscle.

  • while we cut his head off.

  • You can see these different muscle layers in here, too;

  • there's a layer of muscle, little bit of fat, more muscle down here.

  • It has this metallic-y shine between the layers.

  • You could hold his head up, that'd be nice.

  • Woo! There we go. His throat.

  • We just cut through the throat.

  • This is, uh, all cartilage.

  • And you can see bile.

  • There's a little bit of bile matter in there.

  • It's on my finger. And there's blood in here, too.

  • Probably coming up from his bowels.

  • Or his stomach from the, you know,

  • from when he sustained an injury

  • but it just looks like a pipe, it's like a whistle.

  • Not that I wanna put my mouth on it and blow across it.

  • Now I'm just hitting the bone.

  • I would ideally like to cut between

  • two of the vertebrae, but it might be kinda hard to find where they start and end.

  • I can feel the, um,

  • shoot, what is that called, the dorsal spine

  • of one of them, that's the top of the vertebrae.

  • Can you move his head maybe up and down?

  • The other way, like side to side I guess it would be.

  • Oh, there we go. Okay.

  • So when James did that, I could see where, um,

  • two of the vertebrae were occluding together,

  • so I can cut around the cartilage.

  • It's frozen.

  • Yeah, you heard it.

  • You can hear, it's like cutting through ice.

  • Oh, we're getting close.

  • Oop, whup, there we go.

  • So, if you look at it from this way,

  • here is the spinal cord,

  • here is the top of the cervical vertebrae.

  • So this is all muscle.

  • Look at all of the incredible amount of muscle

  • that is on top of the vertebrae.

  • And they extend up until about right here,

  • the rest of this is all just muscle attachment.

  • Here's the throat.

  • It's very springy.

  • Very flexible.

  • And, uh, it's very durable.

  • It looks like it had rings on it.

  • And it does. It has these rings in it

  • that have more connective tissue between them,

  • so it can move kind of like an accordion.

  • Like a spring.

  • Like an accordion spring or something.

  • Then it can open like that.

  • Oh, it's cute. It looks like a bracelet or something.

  • How much do you think that weighs? Just estimate.

  • Um, this is probably 12 to 15 pounds.

  • 12 to 15 pounds. - Uh-huh.

  • With the muscle and everything.

  • Oh yeah, this is heavy!

  • Whoo!

  • This is...

  • Yeah, I mean, this is, uh,

  • how heavy is this, this is about...

  • a six month old

  • right here, don't you think?

  • - No kids.

  • Every time we move him,

  • ugh,

  • or shift him,

  • it seems to like disrupt whatever is making this smell so bad

  • and it's being released out of that incision we made.

  • I have a feeling, uh, it's just gonna be all fun and games for the rest of the day.

  • You ok over there? You're doing good?

  • Woo! Let's do this. This is bone marrow.

  • I guess, I mean, at this point when it's kinda cold,

  • it's like a good, like putty-like consistency

  • it's pretty neat. It's like Play-Doh.

  • I removed the forward right limb,

  • including the scapula and the top half of the humerus

  • this was busted in half, you can see where it was broken there.

  • This is kinda cool, you can see the mechanics

  • of how these bones move together,

  • you have the humerus and the scapula

  • the cartilage makes it very easy for them to move and flex together.

  • We're gonna throw this in the bug box

  • to give them a little bit of something to eat.

  • Oh. Before I do that, I should show you this, too.

  • You know, we knew that the humerus was fractured,

  • I did not know that the scapula has also sustained damage,

  • so you can see where it's broken right there, and splintered,

  • I'm able to flex this a little bit.

  • And a lot of you guys, uh, ask about the bugs and everything

  • and I just wanted to clarify, we don't put the entire body into the beetles.

  • There's no way that these tiny little beetles

  • could feasibly eat all of the muscle tissue before it rots.

  • So this is about how clean something has to be

  • before it goes into the beetles.

  • You wanna remove the majority of all the muscles,

  • this stuff that is harder to remove around the edges

  • that's what the beetles will go for.

  • This is the part I am the very most nervous about,

  • because it seems to be that the horrible oder

  • keeps emanating from this region.

  • Although this is the bright green nasty part,

  • every time we move the nether regions, we seem to get

  • a- a revival of the delicious rotten egg

  • dead bacteria smell that keeps coming off of this guy.

  • So we're gonna remove this, this back limb right now

  • and hope that I don't throw up.

  • I mean I'm gonna do my best to not cut into it unnecessarily, but I'm nervous.

  • I'm gonna be cutting down here. I'm... oh, god.

  • We talked about maybe having a safety word

  • in case we needed to run.

  • But I think the safety word will be just some of us screaming

  • and going: "Oh my god, get out of here!"

  • So we have blood.