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  • It's day 12 of your 30 Day Vocabulary ChallengeOne video a day every day for 30 days.  

  • We're learning 105 words from the academic word  list, so these are words you'll need to know if  

  • you're preparing for the IELTS or TOEFL exam, but  also if you read or watch the news in English,  

  • or have conversation in English. These are  intermediate words, and we're going to study them  

  • in real situations so your understanding will  go beyond just memorizing a definition. So  

  • grab your friends, have them join you  in this challenge, and let's do this!  

  • As always, if you like this video  or you learned something new,  

  • please like and subscribe with notifications.  I'd love to have you as my student.

  • During these 30 days, we're learning 105  words together. I do have a download for you,  

  • a list of all the words with definitions and  sample sentences, as well as quizzes to make  

  • sure you're really getting and remembering these  words. You can get that download by following  

  • this link or the link in the video descriptionToday, we're learning four new words,  

  • and we're looking at the different ways these  words are used in various real situations.  

  • For each word, you'll get the definition, we'll  go over the pronunciation, you'll get to see it  

  • up close and in slow motion, and then we'll also  go to Youglish for five examples from real life.

  • Our first word today is MAINTENANCE.

  • Maintenance. The pronunciation of this word islittle tricky. That T is a stop T. Every once in  

  • a while, you might hear a true T. Maintenance. But  that's rare. It's much more common to hear a stop  

  • T in the pronunciation. Maintenance. And that's  what you'll hear in all of the examples here.  

  • Maintenance. Maint-- Stop of air. MaintenanceWe've got three N's, we make the first one,  

  • then we stop the air for the stop T.  Maint-- nn-- Then make the N again,  

  • you don't need to move your tongue, this is for  the second N, Maint-- nn-- Maint-- nn-- ance.  

  • Then just a quick down and up to  make your third N. Maintenance.

  • It's a noun, it means keeping  something in good condition,  

  • by making repairs or correcting problems. The  maintenance fees for my website are pretty low.  

  • Let's see this word again up close and  in slow motion. This is with the stop T.

  • And now, we'll go to Youglish to see  five examples of this word in context.

  • And it has to last 20 years without maintenance.

  • When you or I go to the doctor forcheck-up, we don't go because we're sick.  

  • We go because it's a good idea. Our  doctor takes a look at our general health  

  • and gives us advice on how to stay healthy. This  is the idea of maintenance for a car, changing  

  • oil, checking the tires, replacing filters, that's  maintenance. This particular piece of machinery  

  • needs to be built to run without problems  with no need for maintenance for 20 years.

  • And it has to last 20 years without maintenance.

  • Here's another example.

  • I think the fact that some of your  

  • service and maintenance people don't  make a livable wage is shameful.

  • Service and maintenance people. He means  workers who repair mechanical equipment,  

  • buildings or machines. A livable wage meansperson should be able to live off of his salary.  

  • If he's working full-time, pay bills, buy foodpay for housing, and transportation, and so on,  

  • this man is saying that these kinds  of workers at this organization  

  • are not making enough working full-time to  take care of all of these basic expenses.

  • I think the fact that some of your  

  • service and maintenance people don't  make a livable wage is shameful.

  • Let's see another example.

  • But I mean most of it is also  just like body maintenance,  

  • like maintaining your body in different ways.

  • Taking care of our bodiesWhat does that look like?  

  • Healthy eating, exercising, getting enough sleepThese are the basic parts of body maintenance.

  • But I mean most of it is also  just like body maintenance,  

  • like maintaining your body in different ways.

  • Let's look at another example.

  • Sidewalks that shift or settle over time make  the maintenance of accessible features important.

  • A city is expected to maintain or  take care of its public spaces.  

  • If a road gets damaged, the city has to fix it.  

  • If bumps show up on a sidewalk, it's the city's  job to repair it and smooth it out again.

  • Sidewalks that shift or settle, over time make the  maintenance of accessible features important.

  • Our last example.

  • They are a fairly high maintenance  part of airport and airline security.

  • Did you hear her use an adjective there before  maintenance? High-- high maintenance versus low  

  • maintenance. High maintenance requires more timemore money, more work to keep up. Low maintenance  

  • requires less. An airport is definitelyplace that I would say is high maintenance,  

  • needing quite a bit of effort to keep it running  smoothly. These words can also be used for people.  

  • Someone who's high maintenance has a lot of  specific needs and needs a lot of attention.  

  • Someone who's low maintenance is laid backMy four-year-old is pretty high maintenance,  

  • he doesn't like playing by himself very  much, he always wants me to play with him.

  • They are a fairly high maintenance  part of airport and airline security.

  • Our next word is RANGE. Range. It's a noun, and it  means a group of things or people that are usually  

  • similar in some way, or a series of numbers  that includes the highest and lowest possible  

  • amounts. We'll be covering a range of topics in  this class. The salary range is thirty to forty  

  • five thousand dollars. As a verb, it means to  include everything between specified limits.  

  • The peppers ranged from mild to spicy. Let's  see this again up close and in slow motion.

  • And now, we'll go to Youglish to see  five examples of this word in context.

  • Our courses range anywhere from eight  days all the way up to 82 days in length.

  • Think about a course you've takenWhat's a typical range or length of time  

  • from start to finish? A semester in  the US is generally about 15 weeks.

  • Our courses range anywhere from eight  days all the way up to 82 days in length.

  • Here's another example.

  • Now, the range is anywhere from  you know, 43 down to 18 or 19.

  • Range is a very helpful word to use when  you're talking about data and graphs.  

  • He says that the values on the  Y-axis are 18 at the lowest point  

  • and 43 at the highest point. So the  full range there covers 25 units.

  • Now, the range is anywhere from  you know 43 down to 18 or 19.

  • Let's see another example.

  • We talked about a whole range of things.

  • A whole range of things. Lots of different  topics. When I chat with my brother, we discuss  

  • everything, from what we ate for dinner to  politics, to whatever books we're reading,  

  • what's going on at work, what we're planning  to do at Christmas, and so on. We cover it all,  

  • a whole range of subjects,  a wide range of subjects.

  • We talked about a whole range of things.

  • Let's look at another example.

  • Luckily for me, it was quite far away. But  

  • my colleague Philippe got to  see it at very close range.

  • This guy is telling a story about hiking  outside with a friend and subtly running  

  • into a mountain lion. In this case, close  range sounds like 20 to 50 feet away,  

  • maybe even closer. In other uses, close range  could mean one to six feet away, like with social  

  • distancing, we want to keep a range of at least  six feet away from others during the pandemic.

  • Luckily for me, it was quite far away but  

  • my colleague Philippe got to  see it at very close range.

  • Our last example.

  • And these letters range from heartbreak and  loss, just spats with parents or siblings.

  • This woman studies difficult relationshipsPeople have sent her letters and emails about  

  • all kinds of hard situations that they've been  through. Heartbreak and loss mean sad stories.  

  • Spats means stories about fights and argumentsThe stories cover a range of challenges.

  • And these letters range from heartbreak and  loss. Just spats with parents or siblings.

  • Our next word is ADMINISTRATION.

  • This is a five syllable word with stress on  the fourth syllable. We have secondary stress  

  • on the second syllable, but in general, you  can feel that as unstressed. Administration.  

  • Administration. Administration. It's a nounand it means the activities or group of people  

  • that relate to running a companyschool, or other organization.  

  • My dad works in hospital administration. This  means he's not a doctor, he works in the offices  

  • of the people who run the hospital. Let's  see this again up close and in slow motion.

  • And now we'll go to Youglish to see  five examples of this word in context.

  • He found a man who taught  him database administration.

  • A database administrator uses specialized  software to store and organize  

  • lots and lots of information. This  person works mostly behind the  

  • scenes to keep the information  easy to access and up to date.

  • He found a man who taught  him database administration.

  • Here's another example.

  • I was given the leeway to work with those  funds, and convince the legislature and the  

  • administration that most of that  money should go into health care.

  • Here, administration means a group of  people in charge of making decisions about  

  • how government works. For example, the Trump  administration, the Biden administration.  

  • These are the people that a president  selects to put laws and plans into action.  

  • The word 'leeway' means freedom  to make choices. So in this case,  

  • a person had the freedom to convince those in  charge that this money should go to health care.

  • I was given the leeway to work with those  funds, and convince the legislature and the  

  • administration that most of that  money should go into health care.

  • Let's see another example.

  • There were a lot of different challenges and  

  • issues. There were different ideas  of management of administration.

  • Do you like group work or group decision  making? Generally, the more people there  

  • are who have to make a decision, the  harder it is to reach an agreement.

  • There were a lot of different  challenges and issues.  

  • There were different ideas of  management of administration.

  • Let's look at another example.

  • And today, it's the Dallas  County administration building.

  • Have you ever been to your city's  courthouse or administration building?  

  • This one in Dallas, Texas has city  government offices that is the offices  

  • of the people who run the city on the first  five floors and a museum on the top floor.

  • And today it's the Dallas  County administration building.

  • Our last example.

  • How many years were you in the administration?

  • He wants to know how long someone worked in  administration. That kind of work includes  

  • preparing budgets, policies, contractsmanaging employees, lots of leadership  

  • tasks fall under the umbrella of administrationSo it's the support work of the organization.

  • How many years were you in the administration?

  • Our last word today is RESTRICTED.

  • Thehere is very weak, don't put much air in it.

  • Restricted. Tt-- It shouldn't be like thatin fact, it can be so weak that it might sound  

  • like a D. Restricted. It's an adjective, it means  having a set limit, having definite rules about  

  • what or who is allowed, and not allowed. During  Covid-19, the number of people allowed in the  

  • restaurant at one time is restricted to 15.  Let's look again up close and in slow motion.

  • And now we'll go to Youglish to see  five examples of this word in context.

  • What was once a behavior restricted to the  schoolyard and neighborhood, has now gone viral.

  • She's talking about bullying. A bully  is someone who frightens, hurts,  

  • or threatens someone smaller or weaker. Before  social media, bullying happened in person at  

  • school, or outside in public. It only happened in  certain places. Now, bullying happens online too.

  • What was once a behavior restricted to the  school yard and neighborhood, has now gone viral.

  • Here's another example.

  • Their ability to dream and aspire has  just been confined and restricted.

  • Her talk is about young people who grew  up in poor areas of big cities. She says  

  • they can't work towards their dreams  easily because they're restricted.  

  • Something is holding them back or standing  in their way. Maybe it's a lack of money,  

  • a lack of good education, a lack  of a stable community, and so on.

  • Their ability to dream and aspire has  just been confined and restricted.

  • Let's see another example.

  • That's actually pretty common on  very calorie restricted diets.

  • One way to lose weight is to eat fewer caloriesShe uses a noun here to describe the kind of  

  • restrictions. A calorie-restricted dietYou might also try a carb-restricted diet,  

  • or dairy restricted diet. It means you're eating  less or none of those things, of carbs, of dairy.

  • That's actually pretty common on  very calorie restricted diets.

  • Let's look at another example.

  • It really restricted his time.

  • One thing that's restricted my time this year  is having my kids home all day, every day,  

  • during the pandemic. They need my attentionbut my work also requires my attention.  

  • Can you think of something that's  restricted or limited your time lately?

  • It really restricted his time.

  • Our last example.

  • And this epidemic is not  restricted to the US alone.

  • Not restricted. Meaning it's not  happening just here. The epidemic,  

  • or widespread disease, is showing up in  other countries around the world too.

  • And this epidemic is not  restricted to the US alone.

  • Seeing their real-life examples can really help  you understand how to use these words, can't it?  

  • I have a challenge for you now. Make  up a sentence with one of these words,  

  • make a video of yourself saying it

  • and post it to social media, tag me, and use  the hashtag #rachelsenglish30daychallenge

  • Don't be shy, you can do this. Our next video  comes out tomorrow at 10AM Philadelphia time, come  

  • back to learn four more vocabulary words. In the  meantime, keep your studies going with this video,  

  • and check out my online courses  at rachelsenglishacademy.com  

  • You'll become a more confident English speakerAnd please do remember to subscribe. I love  

  • being your teacher. That's it and  thanks so much for using Rachel's English.

It's day 12 of your 30 Day Vocabulary ChallengeOne video a day every day for 30 days.  

Subtitles and vocabulary

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A2 maintenance restricted range administration slow motion motion

LEARN 105 ENGLISH VOCABULARY WORDS | DAY 12

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    Summer posted on 2021/01/16
Video vocabulary