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  • It's day five of your 30 Day Vocabulary ChallengeYes! Let's do this! A video every day for 30 days  

  • to help you master 105 intermediate English  words. We're taking words from the academic  

  • word list, so these are words you'll need to know  if you're preparing for the IELTS or TOEFL exam,  

  • but also if you read or watch news in English  or have conversation with native speakers.  

  • In other words, these are useful and important  words. So grab your friends, have them join you  

  • here in this challenge and let's do this! When  you learn a new word, make up your own sentence,  

  • record yourself saying it, and then post that  in a video to social media using the hashtag  

  • #rachelenglish30daychallenge And as always, if  you like this video or you learned something,  

  • new please like and subscribe with  notifications, it really helps.

  • Don't forget, there's a download to go with this  video. A list of all the words with definitions  

  • and sample sentences, as well as quizzes to make  sure you're really getting and remembering these  

  • words. You can get that download by following  this link or the link in the video description.

  • Today we're learning four new words: SOURCEIDENTIFY, SPECIFIC, and EVIDENT. And we're  

  • looking at the different ways these words are used  in various situations. For each word, you'll get  

  • the definition, we'll go over the pronunciationyou'll get to see it up close and in slow motion,  

  • and then we'll also have five  examples from real life English.

  • Our first word today is SOURCE. You'll see  this in IPA written two different ways,  

  • but the R does change the AW as in law sound.  

  • Also the OH diphthong, so there aren't really  two different ways to say this word. Source.  

  • Source. When the AW as in law is followed by  R, the lips round a little bit more and the  

  • tongue shifts back a little bit moreso it's not a pure law, aw, aw, saw--  

  • source. But it's so-- oh, oh, so-- source.

  • Source. As a noun, it means someone or something  that provides what is wanted or needed.  

  • The cause of something, such as a problemShe's been a great source of strength to me.  

  • Let's look again at the pronunciation  up close and in slow motion.

  • And now we'll go to Youglish for five  examples of this word in real situations.

  • But what if you had to drive four hours to charge  

  • your phone because you had no  reliable source of electricity?

  • Source of energy. An outlet that  provides the electricity needed

  • But what if you had to drive four hours to  

  • charge your phone because you had no reliable  source of electricity? Here's another example.

  • One source of a fuel leak  may be from the fuel lines.

  • One source of a fuel leak. The cause of the leak.

  • One source of a fuel leak  may be from the fuel lines.

  • Here's another example.

  • For me, nature's always beensource of wonder and inspiration.

  • A source of wonder and inspiration. Being  in nature provides wonder for this person.

  • For me, nature's always beensource of wonder and inspiration.

  • Another example.

  • In 2016, I started tracing some of  these memes back to their source.

  • Tracing them back to their  source. They've been shared,  

  • and re-shared over and over on social media, but  where did they start? Where do they originate?

  • In 2016, I started tracing some of  these memes back to their source.

  • Here's our last example.

  • It's a source of, of deep personal satisfaction.

  • A source of satisfaction. Because of  it, a place where satisfaction begins.

  • It's a source of, of deep personal satisfaction.

  • The next word is IDENTIFY. You'll see the letter  T there and if you look it up in a dictionary,  

  • you'll see the T sound in IPA. But this  is a word where T comes after an N,  

  • and that's often a case where we'll drop  the T completely. I just listened to the  

  • first 20 examples on Youglish and none  of them had the T sound all dropped.

  • Four-syllable word with second syllable  stress. The first syllable can be the AI  

  • diphthong or the IH as in sit vowel. Identify  or identify. As a verb, it means to know and say  

  • who someone is, or what something is. He correctly  identified the tree by its unusual leaf shape.  

  • Let's watch again up close and in slow motion.

  • And now we'll go to Youglish for five  examples of this word in real situations.

  • I identify as a woman of color.

  • I identify as, that's like saying  who I am, how I categorize myself.

  • I identify as a woman of color.

  • Here's another example.

  • They say in much of Europe, eaters can identify  the region and the month by what's on the menu.

  • They can identify the region. They can know  and say the region just by looking at the menu.

  • They say in much of Europe, eaters can identify  the region and the month by what's on the menu.

  • Another example.

  • So I think it's important to identify  the barriers to women's political action.

  • Identify the barriers. Not just know that there  are barriers, but know specifically what they are.

  • So I think it's important to identify  the barriers to women's political action.

  • Here's our last example.

  • And it's, it's great to be able to identify with  someone who kind of had that same experience.

  • Identify with, when we identify  with someone or something,  

  • that means we feel we're the same in certain waysTo know that person or that thing, is to know me.

  • And it's, it's great to be able to identify with  someone who kind of had that same experience.

  • Next the word SPECIFIC. Specific.  

  • All three of our syllables here have the IH as  in Sit vowel. Specific. As an adjective, it means  

  • special or particular, clearly  and exactly presented or stated.  

  • Is there anything specific you want for dinner  tonight? The doctor gave the patient specific  

  • instructions on how to care for the woundLet's watch again up close and in slow motion.

  • And now we'll go to Youglish for five  examples of this word in real situations.

  • So just because a deaf  person can't hear a specific  

  • vibration, doesn't mean that they're not  going to also receive other vibrations.

  • A specific vibration. That  one particular frequency,  

  • but they may still be able to hear  other vibrations, other frequencies.

  • So just because a deaf person  can't hear a specific vibration,  

  • doesn't mean that they're not going  to also receive other vibrations.

  • Here's another example.

  • And two specific technologies  are going to make it worse.

  • Two specific technologies. It's not  vague. We know exactly which two they are.

  • And two specific technologies  are going to make it worse.

  • Here's another example.

  • So the science around this  says you need to be specific.

  • You need to be specific. You  can't state things generally,  

  • but specifically, with  details, give the particulars.

  • So the science around this  says you need to be specific.

  • Let's go on to our next example.

  • Now you can get the specific  song that you want to hear.

  • The specific song, not just a genre  of music, or an album or an artist,  

  • but specifically, that one particular song.

  • Now you can get the specific  song that you want to hear.

  • Here's our last example.

  • It might come from, you know, a specific  career focused networking event.

  • A specific event. One particular event.

  • It might come from you know a specific  career focused networking event.

  • Our last word today is EVIDENT.

  • It's an adjective, meaning clear to the  sight or mind, obvious. The problems have  

  • been evident for quite some time. Let's look  again up close and in slow motion.

  • And now we'll go to Youglish for five  examples of this word in real situations.

  • But for him to see what I did havethat was not evident in his community.

  • Not evident. Not clear, not  obvious, or easily known.

  • But for him to see what I did havethat was not evident in his community.

  • Here's another example.

  • It begins we hold these truths to be  self-evident, that all men are created equal.

  • We hold these truths to be self-evident that all  men are created equal. This is the beginning of  

  • the declaration of independence. Self-evidentObvious, not needing to be explained,  

  • clear. The writers of the  declaration of independence  

  • thought it was clear and obvious  that all men are created equal.

  • It begins we hold these truths to be  self-evident that all men are created equal.

  • Another example.

  • That data is evident by itself.

  • Evident by itself. That's  kind of like self-evident,  

  • isn't it? Clear on its owndoesn't need to be explained.

  • That data is evident by itself.

  • Here's another example.

  • It really became evident to me  that I needed to shift my work.

  • It became evident to me. It became clear to  me. Obvious. I could not deny the truth of it.

  • It really became evident to me  that I needed to shift my work.

  • Here's our last example.

  • It was evident  

  • when I would ask my 13-year-old young manwhere do you see yourself in five years?

  • It became clear, obvious, in  conversation with her thirteen-year-old.

  • It was evident when I would ask my 13-year-old  young man: where do you see yourself  

  • in five years?

  • Seeing their real-life examples can really  help you understand how to use these words,  

  • can't it? I have a challenge for you nowMake up a sentence with one of these words,  

  • and post it to social media, tag me, and use  the hashtag #rachelsenglish30daychallenge

  • Don't be shy, you can do this. Our next video  comes out tomorrow at 10AM Philadelphia time,  

  • come back to learn four more vocabulary wordsIn the meantime, keep your studies going with  

  • this video, and check out my online  courses at rachelsenglishacademy.com  

  • You'll become a more confident English  speaker. And please do remember to subscribe.  

  • I love being your English teacher. That's it  and thanks so much for using Rachel's English.

It's day five of your 30 Day Vocabulary ChallengeYes! Let's do this! A video every day for 30 days  

Subtitles and vocabulary

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B1 evident identify specific created equal slow motion obvious

LEARN 105 ENGLISH VOCABULARY WORDS | DAY 5

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    Summer posted on 2021/01/11
Video vocabulary