Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • It's January 5th- - election day in one particular US state, but it has ramifications for the whole country.

  • So that's where we start today's show.

  • I'm Carl Azuz.

  • US President Donald Trump, US vice President Mike Pence, US President elect Joe Biden and U S Vice President elect Kamala Harris.

  • They've all been spending time in Georgia.

  • On Tuesday, voters there are deciding who will fill two US Senate seats, and that will determine which political party controls the Senate for the next two years.

  • A party needs a simple majority of 51 seats to have control of the 100 member Senate.

  • After the November 3rd presidential election, Republicans were projected to hold 50 seats.

  • Democrats were projected to hold 48.

  • Georgia had two seats to fill on Election Day, but none of the states candidates won enough votes then to clinch a spot in the U.S Senate.

  • So Tuesday's runoff there has been preceded by weeks of fierce campaigning, relentless political ads, unceasing robocalls and barrages of text messages.

  • As both political parties have poured millions of dollars into the Peach State, trying to influence the outcome of the vote.

  • The road to socialism does not run through Georgia.

  • We're living at a moment of crisis.

  • We win Georgia, we save America.

  • Elections are a matter of life, and death.

  • Georgia law requires that any candidate running for state, local or federal office wins at least 50% of the vote.

  • That didn't happen on Election Day.

  • So now these races are headed for a runoff in January, leaving the makeup of the U.S. Senate hanging in the balance.

  • The rematches will determine who controls the power on Capitol Hill.

  • If Republicans can manage to win one or both of the seats, Republicans will maintain control of the U.S Senate, and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell will remain the majority leader.

  • If Democrats, however, can win back both seats, they'll manage to create a tie in the US Senate that can always be broken by the vice president, handing Democrats control of not just the US House but also the entire Congress.

  • The two Republican senators, running David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler, are running against Democrats John Assef and Rafael Warnock, two Democratic underdogs who are hoping to find the same success Biden found in Georgia during the general election.

  • If Loeffler wins, she'll add to the Republican ranks and the record breaking number of Republican women on Capitol Hill.

  • If Warnock wins, he'll become the first black senator from the state of Georgia.

  • All eyes are on Georgia and January 5th.

  • Another date coming up on the U.S. political calendar is January 6th.

  • That's when Congress is set to count Electoral College votes, which American state certified last month.

  • This is normally a ceremonial exercise, but at least 12 Republican senators and 140 House Republicans plan to oppose counting electoral votes for President-elect Biden.

  • What they want to do is hold a 10-day emergency review of votes in some US states.

  • Objections like this have been made before.

  • In 2005, dozens of congressional Democrats challenged Ohio's results in the 2004 election.

  • They said widespread voting problems were to blame, and that's what President Trump and some of his Republican allies say was the problem this time around.

  • But 15 years ago, Congress still moved ahead on certifying President George W. Bush as the winner of the 2004 election, and analysts say that's all but certain to happen this Wednesday for president elect Joe Biden.

  • President Trump's challenges to the 2020 results have not succeeded in changing the outcome in any state.

  • Certified results from Georgia showed Biden winning there with 11,779 more votes than Trump.

  • In a phone call on Saturday with Georgia's secretary of state, President Trump said he wanted to quote find 11,780 votes, one more than his opponent won by because President Trump says he actually won the state.

  • But Georgia's Secretary of state, Brad Raffensperger, said the president's data was wrong and that the truth would come out .

  • As far as Georgia's senate races go, we'll keep you updated on what happens this week.

  • 10-second trivia!

  • Where would you find the most populated city in the world?

  • Japan, Brazil, India or China?

  • Greater Tokyo, the capital of Japan, has a population of about 38 million people.

  • Friday, July 23rd is the planned kick off date for the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympics.

  • They're still being called that even though it's 2021 the same pandemic that postponed the Games in the first place is threatening to cancel them all together .

  • To be clear , that hasn't happened yet.

  • The show is scheduled to go on this summer in Japan, but there are new strains of coronavirus that have cropped up around the world, and they're causing new headaches in the efforts to fight the disease.

  • It's common for viruses to mutate or change.

  • At least one of the new covid strains, or variance, is believed to spread faster than the original one, but it's not believed to be more deadly.

  • The survival rate for the new and older strains is estimated to be more than 99%.

  • Health officials don't know yet if the newly approved emergency vaccines work against the new strains.

  • But as they race to find answers and treatments for all variants of coronavirus, concerns about the disease in Japan are bringing some Olympic sized questions.

  • It's just 200 days now until the postponed Tokyo Olympics are set to kick off, and that mammoth task of planning the games in the middle of the pandemic is only getting harder.

  • Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga said that he is considering declaring a state of emergency as the country grapples with soaring COVID-19 cases, the governors of Tokyo and three neighboring prefectures have already urged the prime minister to do so.

  • The country is reporting thousands of new covid cases a day, bringing the national total to nearly a quarter million.

  • The country has also detected several cases of the new potentially more contagious variants of Covid-19, prompting the government to ban entry foreign travelers through the end of the month.

  • Now, even though the state of emergency wouldn't have any legal enforcement, Japanese officials have been reluctant to take any steps that would harm the economy.

  • Olympic organizers have already said that the games will be simplified with pare back opening and closing ceremonies.

  • Officials said that they'll decide in the spring how many foreign fans, if any, can attend.

  • Despite high confidence from the president of the IOC that fans will be able to come, the success of the Olympics really hinges on how fast the world could get vaccinated.

  • In Japan, vaccination is not set to begin until February, far behind some countries, but the stakes are very high this year for the games to go forward as planned.

  • Olympic organizers have said that if the games do not go as planned this summer, the games will simply be canceled, not postponed again.

  • Japan has sunk an unprecedented amount of money into these games.

  • These games were already set to be the most expensive summer games on record.

  • And now, because of the postponement and because of Covid-19 prevention measures, that cost has only increased by billions more to now $15.4 billion.

  • Selena Wang, CNN, Tokyo.

  • [Archaeologists have unearthed an ancient "snack bar" in the ruins of Pompeii, Italy.]

  • [Experts say this their first time finding a complete example of a "thermopolium".]

  • [It's a hot food and drinks shop that would serve the equivalent of ancient street food.]

  • [It was adorned with colored frescoes depicting animals that were likely on the menu.]

  • [Traces of nearly 2,000-year-old food were found in deep terra cotta jars in the shop.]

  • [Pompeii was home to about 13,000 people when it was destroyed by a volcanic eruption in 79 AD.]

  • For 10 out of 10, this method of Christmas tree recycling is sure to get your goat.

  • At a farm in Massachusetts, it's like Christmas morning for the animals who love to eat the old trees.

  • It's not just the Nigerian dwarf goats on the property who enjoy the special treat.

  • It's the chickens to who apparently pick off the needles for a snack.

  • This all started when the family who owns the farm tried giving their tree to the goats.

  • And after that, well, they didn't need to needle their friends and neighbors to goat them into a recycling program, that people weren't chicken to join.

  • Its like a barnyard eat along.

  • That's tough to bleat, and no one thinks it's a bad idea.

  • That's just terrible.

  • Before we go today, want to give a shout out to our friends in Medford, Massachusetts.

  • All those students watching at Medford High School. You guys awesome.

  • We picked these schools from the comments of our most recent show at youtube.com/CNN10.

  • I'm Carl Azuz.

  • You have an amazing rest of your day, Yeah.

It's January 5th- - election day in one particular US state, but it has ramifications for the whole country.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B2 CNN10 georgia president senate state election

All Eyes On Georgia | January 5, 2021

  • 3411 98
    林宜悉 posted on 2021/01/11
Video vocabulary