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  • Do dodo do dodo do "Kicking opioid, brain  active..." Hi, James from www.engvid.com . I'm -  

  • reject, reject, and "In E we trust"?  What is this? Nouns and verbs?  

  • What, you don't? Oh, maybe - I don't  know. Maybe you guys don't know.  

  • This particular lesson is about seven verbs - or  are they nouns? Notice I put "noun/verb" here.  

  • What I mean by this is, there are many words  in English which look exactly the same. Now,  

  • I'm not talking about words that have  -ing or -ed, where you can say "worked"  

  • and you know it's a noun - sorry, a verb right  away. But there are some words, they are written  

  • in a way that you can't tell if it's a noun or  a verb right way. Now, it looks like Mr. E here  

  • is of two minds. He's looking at the word  "reject" and he doesn't know, are you a reject?  

  • Or, is something been a reject, or rejectedright? Noun or verb, and I did the idea there.  

  • But we're going to do a lesson, and I'm going to  try to teach you how to tell the difference when  

  • you see the word written the exact same wayright? I don't want you to reject my offer,  

  • and this product is a rejectIf you listen very carefully,  

  • there was a difference I will tell youEven though it's not written on paper,  

  • how you can figure out the difference  between the noun and the verb.  

  • And to explain this, "In E we trust". A lot of  money around the world, they'll have "In God  

  • we trust". Now, you see there are two E's, and  I'm going to give you a bit of history because,  

  • well, it's www.engvid.com . You  get more than your money's worth,  

  • pardon the pun. January - and the month in  the English calendar - January looks at the  

  • year before, and the year ahead. And the god is  a Roman god called Janus. And E is looking here  

  • because his two heads are looking at one word  and the two possible meanings. You like that?  

  • Me too. Let's go to the board. What are the seven words? Well, if you're in  

  • business, you're going to hear a lot about, you  know reporting. And you're going to hear a lot  

  • about refunding or refilling an order or something  like that. And what I've tried to do is give you  

  • seven words that you probably will  see a lot in your line of work.  

  • And you may be confused by it when you know  for sure - I know for a fact you've probably  

  • heard the word "refund", and you know  what a refund is, but when someone says,  

  • "We have to offer a refund", sorry  "When we refund their money",  

  • and you're like, "What's the difference?" There's  a difference that makes the difference.  

  • Typically, what is found is when a word that can  be a noun or a verb and you're confused by it,  

  • listen to the pronunciation. Now, of course, right  away, you're not going to become an expert at  

  • doing this, but I'm going to try my best today  to make it clear enough, so I might exaggerate  

  • a little bit. And I don't necessarily want you  going out there, "I want a REEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEfund!"  

  • so they know it's a noun. They'll get the pointwhether you get it right. But you want to be  

  • able to hear when someone speaking to you, rightBecause on paper, it's easy. You read something;  

  • you can see it. But when they're speaking, you  want to be able to get the idea from the context  

  • and the way that they speak, what is being offered  to you. Is it a noun or a verb? Alright?  

  • So, we started off, well he says "reject", but  we're going to start up here. All the nouns are  

  • in red, and all the verbs in black. And notice  they're exact same except where I've shown you is,  

  • if you look carefully, where we put more  emphasis or we try to emphasize more of the  

  • verbs or the vowel sound, it's at the beginning of  the word when it comes to nouns. And when it comes  

  • to the verb, we tend to emphasize the latter part  of the - the last part and the vowels in the last  

  • part of the word. So, even though it's the same  word, for instance: I would like a refund for my  

  • apple. It's broken. It's got  a bite in it, someone ate it.  

  • But they can - but they might say: We  will refund your money at a later date.  

  • And I don't go "RE-fund". I go "re-FUND" your  money. The "fund" - mm, this is a delicious apple.  

  • The "fund" is getting more emphasis  there. So, you can ask for a "RE-fund",  

  • and we will "re-FUND" your money later, "re-FUND".  

  • Refund being the actual money that's given to  you. Refunding is actually giving it back.  

  • Pardon me while I eat, because it's going on for  a minute or two. Mmm, it's actually delicious,  

  • though. What about "decrease"? Let me  give you a real world example on this one.  

  • Sometimes, you need to - you need  a decrease in the volume. Oh,  

  • students used to do it all the time. They wanted  the volume up and down when I was playing a movie,  

  • and they wouldn't know what to say. Now reallyin English, we say "Turn up the volume" or "Turn  

  • it down". It comes from old technology when we  literally used to turn it up and down. But now,  

  • you can increase it or decrease it with a slideSo, if there is an increase in volume - sorry,  

  • in this case, a decrease. Well, really emphasize  the DE, there's a "DE-crease" in the volume.  

  • Now, you need to "de-CREASE" the volumeNotice this, you need to "de-CREASE",  

  • you need to "de-CREASE" the volume. That's  the verb, I want you to do something.  

  • So, "DE-crease", a decrease means a change when  something has gone from something higher and  

  • has gone to something lower. And to "de-CREASEsomething is to actually bring it down. It's the  

  • movement of bringing it down. Cool? Great. Now, I know you might say, "Well, I know these  

  • vocabulary", but the emphasis today is not about  what the vocabulary is. Some of you don't know all  

  • of these words. It's how to notice the difference  between them when it's a noun and a verb, to  

  • make it much more informative to you. Informative  means you can understand it. Alright? We want you  

  • to get better at understanding our language. The  highest test you can have for language is speaking  

  • and listening. Simply because they happen  instantaneously, and if you make a mistake  

  • when you speak, you can't take it back. And if you  don't get what someone's saying right away, you  

  • will make mistakes. Okay? So, let's move on. So, we did increase and decrease,  

  • and we talked about - and I can say we  have to - here's a real world example,  

  • decrease our labor force, or decrease the  number of workers we have working for us.  

  • Yeah. Not something you want to do if  you have a company, but it happens.  

  • But here's something companies love to  do. They'll say "There was an increase,  

  • there was an increase in the number of sales this  week." Yes! More money, right? Yeah? And we have  

  • to "in-CREASE" the price. You know companies  love to increase the price. Notice I said we  

  • have to "in-CREASE" the price, emphasis on the  back. And there was an "IN-crease" in sales.  

  • Okay? Let's do refill.  

  • Now, I've gained a little bit of weight. I'm sure  you all have. You know, when you sit at home, when  

  • you go to a place that a lot of people frequentMcDonald's? Yes, I said McDonald's, so pay me!  

  • They never pay me, never. But in America  and Canada, especially in the United States,  

  • you can get "RE-fills". I didn't say "refills",  I said "RE-fills". And they walk up proudly.  

  • See, in your country, you're going to  walk up with a cup this big and go,  

  • "Can I get a refill, please?" This. In Americathey go, "Can I get a RE-fill?" Haha, this is  

  • the small!" Okay, clearly not small. But I joked  with you, but we can say, "Fill us for a RE-fill."  

  • The emphasis is that I want you to put liquid  back in, because "fill" means to put to the top.  

  • RE-fill it, okay? But if I am - if I will do  a refill for you, I will refill it for you,  

  • I will "re-FILL". I will put more of an  emphasis on the last part. I'll "re-FILL" it,  

  • I'll "re-FILL" it, "re-FILL" it, not "RE-fill" it,  I'll "re-FILL" it. While here, "I want a RE-fill,  

  • please". So, when it's this, "RE-fill". Oh sorry, I have to go back for a second.  

  • I forgot - and I did decrease. Increase, "inmeans to add on, so you go from one level and  

  • then "crease" is the change. And to increase  something is that movement of change. Similar  

  • to what we discussed with "decrease". Sorry, I  make mistakes. I'm only human, okay? Okay.  

  • So, when we refill, we want to put something  back. It can be a liquid, it can be a product.  

  • You need to refill the shelves. "re-FILL" the  shelves. It means if there were books or apples  

  • and they're empty, you now need to  put more back. Cool? Alright.  

  • I'm going to wait a second. I want you to  try to figure out how you would say this  

  • and how you would say that. Remember the  rule, if it's a noun, you emphasize what?  

  • And if it's a verb, you emphasize  what? Okay. So, now you've said it,  

  • I hope you've said it at least twice out  loud. Listen carefully to how I pronounce it.  

  • You need a "PER-mit" to work here. You need a  "PER-mit" to work here. I cannot "per-MIT" you to  

  • be here. I cannot "per-MIT" you to be here. Notice  the difference? I emphasized "PER-mit" here,  

  • which is a piece of paper giving you authority to  do something. It can be a permit to drive a car,  

  • for instance, your license is a permit. But to  permit you, and I put the emphasis on the end,  

  • is to allow you to do something. So, the permit  is the paper. You have a permit to be here?  

  • Show me the paper. I cannot permit you; I  cannot allow you. Or you are permitted to  

  • be here. I added -ed to give you a little  bit of a difference, but you're allowed to  

  • be here. But I cannot "per-MIT" you, and do you  have a "PER-mit"? Told you, it's not easy.  

  • So, how about we try another one where you can  try and see what the pronunciation will be, okay?  

  • And this is the one Mr. E did, and you  can see if you're better than E. Ready?  

  • Now, this time, I'm going to be a little  bit tricky, because I'm going to say them,  

  • and I want to see if you can guess which one is  which. Are you ready? So, we have to "re-JECT"  

  • your offer. Sorry, we have to "re-JECTyour offer. We have to "re-JECT" your offer.  

  • That is a "RE-ject". That is a "RE-ject". Which  one was the noun, and which one was the verb?  

  • If you say the second one was the noun, you're  correct, because that was a "RE-ject".  

  • There's another way to help you, by the way, in  case, you've probably figured out grammatically.  

  • If it was on paper, it's easy to see. If you  see an article before any of these words,  

  • it's a noun. A, or the, or an. You won't  see one here. You may see the infinitive,  

  • to refund, to decrease, to increase, to  refill, to permit, to reject, to insult. Okay?  

  • That's the easy way of doing it. But you really  want to work on the listening part of it. That's  

  • what this is more about. We're getting into fine  details to try and get your ear to work better  

  • to be able to pick up English. Because once  you can fix it one area, how well you listen,  

  • you can hear it in other areas, okay? Cool. So, if you said "RE-ject" was for a noun,  

  • congratulations, you got it rightAnd if you went to "re-JECT",  

  • for the verb, correct. If you  didn't get it right, that's okay.  

  • Because you know we have a quiz coming up and  we're going to work on this again. Alright.  

  • So, last one, because I want to move on to our  quiz, I'm going to help you with this one. So,  

  • this is "IN-sult", "IN-sult",  instead of "in-SULT", "in-SULT".  

  • "IN-sult", you put the emphasis - and if you think  about what the word is - Oh sorry, did we forget  

  • the "reject" thing? I must be a reject! That's the  second time I've done this in one lesson! Okay.  

  • I explained what a permit was, as beingpiece of paper you have and to allow you,  

  • but to reject something is to say no. Actuallythis end part here, "ject" comes from "to throw  

  • out". So, when you reject something, you throw it  back. You say no, I don't want it. It's a reject.  

  • And when you reject in this case, you just say  no. So, a reject is something that's not any good.  

  • You don't want or need, and to reject something  is to say no. So, in both cases, they're  

  • both negative. You don't like something. And insult, if you don't know what it is, it's  

  • when you say to something - something to someone  that could be rude about them, their family, their  

  • country. It's to say you don't like something  in a not nice way. So, it's an insult, right?  

  • So, to "IN-sult" someone, you can almost feel that  emphasis like, "That was an IN-sult!" You really  

  • said something I didn't like. Okay? And you can  - you don't have to "in-SULT" anybody. You don't  

  • have to say something rude. So, I've used two  to help you - let you know that it's - sorry,  

  • the infinitive, insult anyone, okay? Cool. So, we've got the noun, we've got the verb. To  

  • make it easy, I put all the verbs  in black, all the nouns in red.  

  • Our simple rule about going forward when we're  listening to this is that you should put the  

  • emphasis on the beginning of the word for the  nouns. And for the verbs, you put the emphasis  

  • on the vowel sounds at the ends of the words. Soif you've ever been confused when somebody said,  

  • "You need to refund this, and I have a refund."  And you're like "Eh, I kind of understand but  

  • I'm confused"? Now you know the big secret is  to, when you're speaking, ask them to repeat  

  • and listen to the stress. Cool? Alright. So, we've got that down, but they're - you  

  • know me. I always say there's  knowing - or do I always say that? I  

  • try to remember to say there's a difference  between knowing and understand. Now, I taught  

  • you the lesson so I know you know it, but do you  understand it? Let's do a test and find out.  

  • And we're back. I always think it's important to  know the why, what, and how of doing something in  

  • a lesson. And it may have escaped me from doing  it at the beginning, so let me fix that now.  

  • Why am I teaching this lesson? Well, it's not just  a lesson on vocabulary, because these seven words  

  • we earlier may be familiar to you. Really, what  I wanted to do is help you - help enable you to  

  • listen more like a native speaker, by being able  to listen to intonation and be able to get the  

  • meaning from it. And that's a really cool skill  to have. It means less times of you going, "Huh?",  

  • or being confused, and more of you being  able to participate in a conversation.  

  • And that's important. That's the why. And how did we do it? Well, we used the  

  • vocabulary, showed you - used it in its natural  state, and we showed you how it differs when  

  • it's a noun and a verb. And when and where, you  might ask? I'm going to answer that right now.  

  • I told you it was business vocabularyso you can use it in the board room.  

  • But you can also use it when you go the storeAnd let's go to the board right now and take  

  • a look at Mr. E and James having an interaction  at the store using what you just learned. I want  

  • you to pay attention, specifically, I want you to  see, by yourself, try not to look at any articles.  

  • I helped you there, okay? But try to see if  you can hear if it's a noun or a verb. Okay?  

  • So, I'll go through the story  first, then we will mark it up,  

  • we'll see if you got it correct and we'll go to  our bonus. Are you ready? Let's go the board.  

  • Mr. E says, "Can I get" - Oh, I love toy  planes, RRRRR! - "Can I get a refund for  

  • this broken toy?" That's what he's askingright? What does James say? "Was it a present?  

  • Was it a present?" "Does it matter? You aren't  allowed to reject my request. It's broken."  

  • "My boss", so James says, "My boss won't permit  me to take it back without a receipt." Mr. E then  

  • says, "Don't insult my intelligence! You  sold it to me, so refund my money now!"  

  • Okay. Cute story. Now, let's see if we can  actually go through it and find out whether  

  • it's a noun or a verb, not just by looking  at the grammar. Because when you speak,  

  • words don't come in the  air. You have to listen.  

  • "Can I get a refund for this broken toyCan I get a RE-fund for this broken toy?"  

  • Noun or verb? "RE-fund", noun. I'm sure  you're doing pretty well. You've got  

  • one out of five. Let's keep going. "Was it a present? Was it a present?"  

  • Noun. Now, one way you can also tell here, for  present, is yes, there's more emphasis here,  

  • but there's "pre-zent", sounds like a Z,  and "present" sounds more like an SZ. So,  

  • if you have a little confusion there, you  can look not just for emphasis but the  

  • SZ versus Z. You need to "prezent" that,  "present". Okay? Look for an SZ or Z sound  

  • and differentiate between the two. It'll  help with the emphasis from the front.  

  • "Does it matter? You aren't  allowed to reject, 're-JECT'" -  

  • well, yeah. The emphasis is here on "ject".  Not "RE-ject", "re-JECT". So, that would be a  

  • verb. You're doing pretty well! Next sentence, "My boss won't  

  • permit me, 'per-MIT' me to take it  back without a receipt." Noun or verb?  

  • Verb, "per-MIT", not a  "PER-mit", but "per-MIT".  

  • And finally, "Don't insult my intelligence." Don't  insult my intelligence. "You sold it to me, so  

  • refund my money now!" That's a tough one. First of  all, you have to figure out if there is one or two  

  • words in here that we need to look at. So, I'm  going to give you a little extra time here.  

  • Cool. If you noticed it, we're looking at "in-SULT  my intelligence" and "re-FUND my money now".  

  • Making both of them verbs, two verbs. So, how'd you do? Did you get them all  

  • right? If not, you can always just go  back to the beginning of the lesson,  

  • listen to the pronunciation and go from  there. And then redo this test, okay? Cool.  

  • As always, I have a bonus for  you, so let's go over this way,  

  • and we're going to look at your three words hereAnd I've addressed them as being nouns and verbs.  

  • And you might go, "Oh James, you  just gave me seven other ones. Why  

  • would you give me extra ones?" Well, my  dears, this is a different one. You see,  

  • when I did the first ones, they are similarright? A "RE-fund" and "re-FUND" is to give  

  • something back, right? When we also did, what's  another one we can do for you like we did refund?  

  • We did reject - a "RE-ject" and "re-JECTis to say no. But in these particular words,  

  • the noun and the verb look the same, but  may not have the exact same meaning.  

  • Now, the first one is to suspect, suspect.  

  • Sorry, my mistake, "SUS-pect". See, even a native  speaker, because now I have to think about this.  

  • If you're a suspect, it's very  different than to suspect,  

  • okay? So, when you're a "SUS-pect", which is the  noun - have any of you watched TV and you watch  

  • the cop programs? And they go, "We have three  suspects right now for this particular crime."  

  • A suspect is someone you believe has done  something wrong. Not necessarily a criminal,  

  • but you think so. Now, to "sus-PECT" something  is to have a belief. I suspect if we find under