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  • - Hey guys, this is Nigerian Slang

  • With Yvonne Or-- ♪

  • No, I don't know why I did that.

  • [test screen beep]

  • This is Nigerian Slang

  • with Yvonne Orji. [chuckles]

  • We're gonna have fun.

  • [upbeat music]

  • First word, shine your eye.

  • Okay, this is what every Nigerian aunty,

  • mother, big cousin tells you whenever you go

  • to any wedding function, especially if

  • you're a single over, I don't know, 12.

  • Make sure you shine your eye

  • and when you go into a room, just shine your eye.

  • Don't be 30 at a wedding and you're not shining your eye,

  • you're not serious.

  • U Dey Craze, U Dey Craze.

  • This basically means are you crazy.

  • Usually you use this in a sentence when somebody's

  • being mad disrespectful, just really stupid,

  • or just asked you a question that,

  • U Dey Craze, eh, are you okay, is everything okay?

  • U Dey Craze, as in you gotta be crazy bruh,

  • 'cause, you know who I am?

  • Ah! Baddo.

  • It's a guy or a girl, they mad fresh,

  • Gucci down to the socks, [mumbles] Baddo, hey, uncle!

  • Baddo.

  • This is when you go to a function

  • and everybody is just looking right.

  • You gotta recognize the Baddo-ness

  • that is in the presence. Baddo.

  • And you gotta emphasize that double "d"

  • that d-d-d.

  • Yeah. I have one of these.

  • Everybody's not blessed to have the Yash.

  • A Nigerian, if you will, if you have a nice Yash,

  • you a Baddo!

  • [laughs]

  • When a woman walks into a room,

  • and its like "[Nigerian] Yash"

  • It's 'cause, you know, the Nigerian buttocks,

  • they just be, they got a mind of their own,

  • they walking, and you just

  • "da da, da da, brrr"

  • It's like a drum, like a

  • [drum impression]

  • So ya know, yash, it's like a drum beat.

  • Ah, Olodo.

  • Here's what you don't wanna be.

  • You don't wanna be an Olodo.

  • 'cause an Olodo is just, a fool.

  • You know what, just a fool.

  • You're just, dunce.

  • Look at that Olodo.

  • You say that when you've asked someone

  • to do something for you,

  • it's a very simple situation,

  • and they fail,

  • time and time again.

  • And you're just like,

  • "are you an Olodo?"

  • What? Olodo like you.

  • It's usually like with a point.

  • When Nigerians say something with a eye squint,

  • and a point,

  • [sigh]

  • It's just dismantled your soul, okay?

  • Olodo.

  • [Laughs]

  • This one is Amebo.

  • Just a amebo-

  • you're a gossip.

  • Just, busy body, walking in you're-

  • Amebo like you.

  • You're just going around town,

  • trying to tell people's business,

  • trying to find out other people's business,

  • that's Amebo.

  • You don't wanna be an Amebo.

  • [Laughs]

  • You definitely don't wanna be an Ashewo.

  • I don't know why I'm getting tickled by these words, but

  • Ashewo is what we like to call

  • a woman of the night.

  • She's a street walker.

  • She's got advance.

  • Basically, she a prostitute, y'all.

  • And now, we call people Ashewos,

  • who are not even prostitutes.

  • If you're that chick,

  • what American's would call a thot, maybe.

  • An Ashewo like you.

  • Anytime something is said with five fingers, never good.

  • [Laughs]

  • This is basically the warning.

  • The Nigerian, "I'm giving you one more chance,

  • 'cause you don't want me to blow,

  • so before I get real upset, I'm gonna tell you

  • 'respect yourself'"

  • Again, it's with a squinted eye,

  • and a point.

  • And then it's usually accompanied

  • by a "my friend."

  • When Nigerians say "my friend" they don't mean that

  • as a term of endearment,

  • you're not their friend.

  • So this would really be

  • "my friend, heh, respect yourself."

  • So, again, see your life.

  • It can be interpreted in a good way,

  • and a negative way.

  • Negative way first.

  • When you say something out-of-pocket,

  • or do something out-of-pocket,

  • somebody who's looking at you

  • can be like "see your life, just see your life."

  • What are you doing with your life?

  • Like you're not gonna make it,

  • like, just, look at your everlasting life.

  • Just, I need you-

  • Nigerians curse people out by

  • like wanting them to analyze themselves, right?

  • Just, see your life. Are you happy with it?

  • It's like a TED talk, like, am I in therapy?

  • The fun way about how to use "see your life"

  • is if somebody says something-

  • this is very flirtatious,

  • and somebody says like,

  • "ah, you're looking very good,

  • your yash is very big"

  • And if you want this kind of attention

  • from said guy, you can be like

  • "mhm, see your life,

  • mhm, stop it, see your life."

  • So it can go both ways.

  • [Laughs]

  • I.J.G.B

  • I would be considered an I.J.G.B

  • This stands for

  • the "I Just Got Backs.'

  • You know, whenever immigrant kids

  • who have come back to Nigeria from the States,

  • or from London,

  • every sentence starts with

  • "You know, I just got back from London,

  • I just got back from Yankee,

  • I just got back from the States"

  • And the people who are Nigerian are like

  • "we get it, you got a blue passport, nobody cares."

  • So they've dubbed us the I.J.G.Bs.

  • Oh you know, the I just got backs.

  • They want to tell you in every sentence,

  • where they just got back from,

  • like we can't travel.

  • [Laughs]

  • So basically they created this term to hate on us, okay.

  • [sighs]

  • I love my people.

  • Oh, Fine Boi.

  • When you go to a wedding and you have

  • shined your eye, and you see a what?

  • Fine Boi. A Fine Boi like this.

  • There used to be a song, that's like

  • "Fine Boi, no pimple,

  • I love your smile, I love your dimple."

  • So yeah, if you a Fine Boi, no pimple

  • that means you have a fresh face.

  • Fine Boi like, anyhow,

  • God has magnificently created you,

  • you're just fine.

  • Fine, anyhow.

  • Uh, Learner.

  • I love that these words just mean

  • so many different things.

  • Like there are English words, 'cause colonization,

  • but we have definitely made them our own.

  • So, Learner, you use this in a sentence like

  • "Are you a Learner?"

  • You're not experienced.

  • If you had an intern,

  • and you're like "can you get me my coffee?"

  • And you had like "I want a Chai latte,

  • double shot of-" I don't know I don't drink coffee,

  • but I'm making all this up.

  • And they bring you back tea.

  • And you're like,

  • "are you a Learner?"

  • Not to be confused with Olodo

  • because that person just a fool.

  • A Learner is just like,

  • they don't know, they're a novice,

  • they're inexperienced.

  • Longa Throat.

  • This is me,

  • this is basically every relationship

  • when a woman orders something

  • and then she sees her guy's plate,

  • and is just like,

  • "hey can I have some of yours?"

  • She would be called a Longa Throat.

  • We want more.

  • We want something that we don't currently have.

  • We want what's on your plate.

  • Like just Longa Throat.

  • We're not satisfied with just what we have.

  • 'cause what's mine is mine,

  • and what's yours is also mine.

  • Don't you know how relationships work?

  • I don't understand.

  • Na You Biko.

  • When you walk up into an event,

  • and you see a fine woman with a Gele,

  • again, big Yash,

  • [foreign language]

  • Her lace has been perfectly orchestrated, ah.

  • You look at her and you say,

  • "ah, aunty, Na You Biko, look at-"

  • You're the one.

  • Like, you are the one.

  • Basically, you're that chick.

  • Na You Biko.

  • And then, you know, we're always so bashful,

  • and so we have to be,

  • "is it me? Ah, please stop it, na you, na you

  • na you, not be me, na you."

  • And so, it just goes back and forth

  • of just trading niceties.

  • This is good. I love saying this

  • because this basically means

  • there's no problem.

  • No Wahala, there's no beef.

  • Is there any Wahala? No Wahala.

  • If you're in the marketplace,

  • you're trying to haggle,

  • you know the vendor is kinda like

  • "come on man, you gotta give me this

  • I don't want beef, I don't want Wahala."

  • And you say, "No Wahala.

  • The price I'm trying to pay is not the price

  • you are agreeing to. There's no problem, No Wahala."

  • And then you guys figure it out,

  • and you settle on it.

  • [Laughs]

  • I love this one.

  • This is Nawa For You.

  • I interpreted it when I say,

  • when I tell people God Bless,

  • like "God Bless it.

  • You know, God Bless the girl."

  • Nawa For You just means like

  • I'm sorry for you.

  • Just, wow. Nawa For You. See Your Life.

  • It all flows.

  • It's kinda like a combination,

  • it's like See Your Life, Nawa For You.

  • And it's just like a compound cursing.

  • You're trying to pull into a parking spot,

  • and somebody's like "Nah nah nah, that's my spot"

  • and you're like "I don't wanna fight today,

  • 'cause I got centered this morning"

  • but as I pass by you,

  • I'm gonna look at you and say

  • "Nawa For You."

  • As in, I can't eve believe you,

  • I can't even, Nawa For You.