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  • - I'm Dacre Montgomery.

  • - I'm Geraldine Viswanathan.

  • - We are Australian, and we're gonna be defining

  • Australian slang for you today.

  • [air whooshes] [upbeat music]

  • - Hoon!

  • - Yeah, hooning, in your car.

  • - Live to hoon, just-

  • - But you can actually get pulled over and you get,

  • I was at the American Embassy in Australia,

  • and someone couldn't get into America

  • because they had a hooning charge from 15 years prior,

  • something crazy, so they couldn't go have their honeymoon.

  • Because they had an hooning charge,

  • which is literally, like, the charge

  • is literally for speeding, but they call it hooning.

  • - To me, I thought hooning was just driving around

  • with friends, listening to music, being a little rascal.

  • But-

  • - I thought, I coulda sworn, 'cause you literally

  • can get pulled, I think hooning is when

  • you're over 20 kilometers over the limit.

  • - Oh!

  • - It's called a hooning charge,

  • because it's such a hooligan.

  • - That's good to know.

  • So yeah, I don't, yeah,

  • I don't endorse that kind of hooning, then.

  • [air whooshes]

  • Bloody ripper.

  • - Yeah, bloody ripper.

  • - [laugh] Wait, that sounded

  • amazing. - That's just an exceptional-

  • - In your voice.

  • - Exceptional term.

  • I like this one.

  • But you gotta say rippa,

  • so you almost replace

  • [typing] that E-R

  • with an A, [typewriter dings]

  • and that's a better phonetic pronunciation.

  • Rippa. Bloody ripper.

  • Exceptional legend.

  • [air whooshes] Tuck in.

  • Ah, food. Yeah.

  • Love it, yeah. - Dinner.

  • - Or food, yeah.

  • [murmurs] - Tuck into some tucker.

  • - Yeah, have some tucker.

  • [air whooshes]

  • - Biccy!

  • - [laughs] Yeah! Biscuit.

  • - Biccy and some tea.

  • - But you gotta say it like that.

  • "Have a little biccy."

  • [Geraldine laughs]

  • [air whooshes]

  • - Pash on!

  • - Yeah, get your pash on.

  • - Make out, baby.

  • - Have a little makeout, yeah. - Smoochin'.

  • - You're in high school, right?

  • - I don't know if I would really use it,

  • but it definitely feels like, yeah,

  • an extreme [laughs] Australian way to say making out.

  • "They pashed."

  • [air whooshes]

  • Okay, Dacre, you wanna do this one?

  • - Ah, you beauty!

  • You beauty!

  • That's beauty used in a sentence.

  • An endearing form of describing how beautiful

  • something is, or a person is, or a experience is.

  • - I feel like the way I would use this,

  • if someone does something nice for me,

  • they'll be like, "Hey, I made you lunch,"

  • and I'll be like, "You beauty," you know?

  • - That's perfect.

  • [air whooshes] - Mates rates.

  • Like if it's your mate, he'll give you

  • mates rates on the expense.

  • He'll give you a little discount.

  • - Like if you have a mate that's a tradie,

  • which is a tradesperson, he's an electrician,

  • and if he usually charges 150 bucks an hour,

  • he'll do it for you for 50, 50 bucks.

  • [laughs]

  • That's a mates rate. - The most Australian sentence

  • ever uttered.

  • [air whooshes]

  • Rubbers?

  • Oh! An eraser.

  • - Yeah.

  • [air whooshes]

  • Brekky.

  • This is my brekky.

  • This is my brekky.

  • - Australia is really good at brekky, breakfast.

  • I feel like we've really, the cafes have really

  • figured out how to do a good brekky.

  • Just like avo toast.

  • I miss that the most about [laughs] Australia.

  • [air whooshes]

  • Oh, cobber!

  • [laughs] - I don't know

  • this one. - This is still used.

  • Ah, cobber. It's like, some of my mates

  • have called me a cheeky cobber,

  • [laughs] which is like, I think,

  • I don't know what the actual, I guess,

  • the derivative of it is, but you say, "You cheeky cobber!"

  • [both laugh]

  • I don't know.

  • Again, I've got a friend that says that to me all the time.

  • And just always remember, replace

  • [typing] that E-R

  • with A, and you're Australian. [typewriter dings]

  • Cobba.

  • [air whooshes] - Ta.

  • Thanks!

  • - Yeah, yeah, thank you, ta.

  • [air whooshes] Coldie.

  • It's like a beer, right?

  • - A brew.

  • - Have a coldie, yeah.

  • - I reckon. - There's nothing

  • like a cold beer in summer on ice.

  • A good VB.

  • [air whooshes]

  • Feeling crook is like feeling unwell,

  • like you're feeling real crook.

  • "I can't go to work today. I'm feeling really bloody crook."

  • - That's good.

  • [air whooshes]

  • We say the dog's bollocks.

  • [laughs]

  • - Like bad?

  • - Do you use it?

  • - I've never used this.

  • - Yeah, like dog's [beep], dog's breakfast.

  • [laughs] [air whooshes]

  • Yeah, I mean, I've got this.

  • - Classic. Crikey!

  • - Crikey. Crikey, mate.

  • - You know, made world-famous by Mr. Steve Irwin.

  • [air whooshes]

  • - Ah, that bloody galah!

  • It's like...

  • - Havin' a chat.

  • - [Dacre] It's like a galah.

  • - Like a birdie.

  • [air whooshes]

  • Halfa. Half an hour.

  • "We'll be there in halfa."

  • - 30 minutes.

  • [Geraldine laughs]

  • [air whooshes]

  • - Innit. This one's very British, though.

  • - That's a crazy story, isn't it?

  • Idn't it?

  • Innit? - Innit?

  • [Dacre laughs]

  • To me, if I'm doing a terrible English accent,

  • I'm probably gonna be like, "Innit?"

  • Like it feels very...

  • - It does feel very British.

  • - I think my English accent is worse

  • than my [laughs] regular accent.

  • I don't know why.

  • - I feel like there's so many different accents

  • in such a short sort of space,

  • like that's the hardest thing.

  • There's like so many tiny variations.

  • [air whooshes]

  • - Get on the lappy.

  • Laptop.

  • - That's what I'm calling you from.

  • Yeah, lappy.

  • Get my lappy out.

  • [air whooshes]

  • - "Oh, yeah, you mole!"

  • - I haven't heard this one!

  • - "You're ugly."

  • This is very "Puberty Blues." - Ah!

  • Oh, okay. - This is quite

  • an old-school term.

  • [air whooshes]

  • - No dramas, no worries, no wackers.

  • Those are some variations.

  • It's just like it's no hassle, or no dramas.

  • "Do you want me to do this?"

  • "Yeah, no dramas."

  • - It's the whole Australian energy.

  • [air whooshes]

  • - Reckon.

  • That's probably the one I use the most,

  • yeah. - Me too.

  • It's like I think, I think, would you say, Geraldine?

  • Like, "I reckon this is a good idea."

  • - Yeah, like, yeah, I reckon that's the right definition.

  • - Thank you so much for listening

  • to our partial definitions, or at least

  • my partial definitions of Australian slang.

  • - Yes, cheers!

  • - See you later.

  • - Catch ya!

  • [upbeat music]

- I'm Dacre Montgomery.

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B1 air australian innit bloody reckon ripper

Dacre Montgomery & Geraldine Viswanathan Teach You Australian Slang | Vanity Fair

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/18
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