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  • Hello and welcome to news of You once again from our lock down home temporary studios.

  • I'm in one part of London and Catherine is on the other side.

  • Hi, Catherine.

  • Hello, Neil.

  • Hello, everybody.

  • And today's story is about a music festival that will go ahead despite coronavirus.

  • Okay, well, that sounds like good news to May.

  • Let's find out some more from this BBC news report.

  • The BBC Problems has unveiled a new program to replace the original schedule, which was scrapped because of the pandemic.

  • The event will open in July with a virtual concert inspired by Beethoven, recorded by 350 musicians in their own homes.

  • There will be live performances at the Royal Albert Hall in the final fortnight of the season, culminating in the traditional last night in September.

  • Yes, so whilst most music festivals around the world have bean canceled due to coronavirus, the largest classical music festival in the world known as the BBC, Prom's will go ahead not quite as planned because they're going to start with online concert and they will finished the season, which lasts about two months, with a really concert in a riel concert hall Okay.

  • Well, you have been looking around at the world's media at how this story is being reported.

  • You've picked out three useful words and expressions.

  • What have you got?

  • Yes, we have virtual mush up, Andi.

  • Unthinkable Virtual mash up on unthinkable.

  • So let's hear your first headline, please.

  • With that word.

  • Virtual, Most certainly we're starting right here in London with the evening standard.

  • The headline BBC prom's 2020 toe hold Virtual First night, Beethoven Tribute on live last night celebrations Virtual appearing via the Internet.

  • Yes.

  • So virtual spelt v i r t u A.

  • L Now the pronunciation of this word is really, really interesting.

  • There is almost no resemblance to the way it appears in spelling.

  • So the first thing is that I is pronounced in virtual.

  • Then you've got the rt, which is pronounced then the U is pronounced you.

  • But the A is pronounced.

  • Oh, so you have virtual virtual.

  • How about that, Neil?

  • Yes, an interesting word because there is virtually no similarity between this spelling and the pronunciation.

  • I know there is very interesting.

  • You said there is virtually no similarity.

  • What did you mean by that, Neil?

  • Almost no There is almost no similarity between the pronunciation and the spelling of the word virtually now, almost is a really good clue to the way that we're using virtually or virtual in this headline.

  • Virtual means almost.

  • But in terms of this kind of technology sense, when we talk about virtual reality, we're saying that something is almost rial.

  • So if you think about things like computer games, where you have a character, you go into a world there are You can move around it, meet other characters.

  • It's not really, but it's almost real.

  • Or at least that's what the developers tell you.

  • It's almost riel, so something's virtual online.

  • It's almost riel, and at the moment we're doing lots of things.

  • Lots of virtual things online.

  • Are we nil?

  • We are.

  • For example, last night I had some virtual drinks with some friends of mine virtual because obviously we're not able to be in the same place.

  • We couldn't go to a real pub.

  • So you hear people talking about virtual pub nights at the moment in the UK yes, lots of things which aren't quite real, but you do them on the computer and they're almost riel and we do them using technology.

  • Okay, well, we're virtually done with this explanation.

  • Let's have a summary.

  • Can you?

  • Mhm.

  • Okay, Catherine.

  • Time.

  • Now for your second headline, please.

  • Okay, We're going to the Gazette.

  • Still in the UK here.

  • The headline BBC Prom's reveals plans for mashup First night on live Last night Mash up media product, which combines clips and music from a number of sources.

  • Yes, mush up two words yet first word M A S h the second word up, and they're joined together with a hyphen.

  • That little line that joins words often you'll see it written just as all word without a hyphen mush up.

  • Yeah, OK, now we're a little bit confused here, as I often am.

  • Are you thinking about potatoes?

  • Right now?

  • I'm thinking about potatoes that you boil, and then you add butter and a drop of milk, and you mash them up to make mashed potatoes.

  • Lovely.

  • I love mashed potatoes, and it's where you get five or six or plenty of potatoes, all single potatoes.

  • But then when you boil them and you mix them together and you use a kind of metal tool called a masher to hit them with, and then they will become one.

  • So you can't tell one from another.

  • They're all mixed up together and ill on.

  • That's where.

  • Can you see where I'm going with this?

  • I can see what you're doing here.

  • Eso If you get different pieces of media, you might get a bit of audio from one source and a bit of visual material from another source and maybe some video and some photographs and a bit of extra voice work.

  • And you put them all together to make a new product that's called a mash up, where you get different pieces of media, makes them together, make something else.

  • There's lots of mash ups you can see on the Internet on their Neil.

  • Any favorites?

  • Yeah, you could see something as simple as two famous people whose faces have been kind of merged together.

  • That's the kind of very simple image mash up.

  • But you also get you also get videos and music from a variety of sources all put together.

  • Yes, I like the one where you've got Laurel and Hardy, that old black and white comedy characters, and they're dancing to modern music that I think there was a really clever mash ups are good fun.

  • Yeah, that's good.

  • What would you mash up if you could do BBC looting English?

  • Mush up, Neil.

  • What would your two products orm or that you put together?

  • Well, it would definitely have to be news review and English for cats.

  • Well, I think the bigger, better presenter than you.

  • That's all I'm saying.

  • Anything that would be nice.

  • This program exactly.

  • But a couple of kitty cats instead of us news what could be called CAT reviews?

  • News news NEWS NEWS REVIEW News review Let's move on.

  • Okay, let's have a summary of that, please.

  • If you like stories about music and music festivals, we have another one for you, don't we, Catherine?

  • We do.

  • Just a few weeks ago, we brought you a story about how most of the world's music festivals are being canceled at the moment.

  • So if you'd like to see that, just click the link in the description and you'll go straight to the program.

  • Okay?

  • Time now for our last headline, please.

  • Yes.

  • Now we are going to the telegraph again.

  • Here in the UK, the problems are part off our national psyche.

  • Ah, last night in isolation is unthinkable.

  • Unthinkable.

  • Not possible to imagine Yes, so the spelling u N t h i n k a b l e.

  • Now this is a kind of three part word.

  • The core of the word is the verb Think we have the the suffix abol, a ble that makes an objective on.

  • Then we've got the prefix u N, which means not so you get something that it's not possible to think about.

  • If something's unthinkable, you can't imagine it.

  • It's not entirely true to say that you can't think about it.

  • It's that you find the idea so awful that you really don't want Thio exactly that.

  • You can think about it.

  • But you don't want to.

  • In the idea of this thought, becoming reality is a terrible one and something we must avoid at all costs.

  • So just to explain a bit about the last night of the problems, the problems is a season of concerts on that the very last night there's a big celebration.

  • Everybody gets dressed up.

  • It's quite patriotic, and British people wave the flags around in things on, gets a really kind of national celebration So this newspaper is saying that we can't allow this celebration, not toe happen if something's unthinkable.

  • We mustn't let whatever it is happen but a Z.

  • Everybody knows lots of unthinkable happened.

  • Things have happened over the recent over the last few months.

  • For example, you would have thought that the postponement or delay or even cancelation of the Olympics would be totally unthinkable.

  • Yes, another word for that is unimaginable.

  • It was unimaginable that the Olympic Games could be canceled, but they were, Yeah, Rob, the other day Hey, said something to me.

  • Very interesting.

  • You So biscuits.

  • He said to me that he had given up biscuits completely.

  • I don't believe it.

  • It's absolutely unthinkable, But imaginable Couldn't possibly happen.

  • I can't even bear to think about it.

  • It would never be.

  • Life would never be the same again.

  • It's simply wrong.

  • Okay, let's have a summary of that word time now then, just for a recap of our vocabulary, please.

  • Yes, we had virtual appearing by the Internet Mush Up media product, which combines clips on music from a number of sources.

  • Andi Unthinkable.

  • Not possible to imagine if you would like to test yourself on this vocabulary.

  • There's a quiz on our website BBC learning english dot com Stay safe, everybody See you next time.

  • Bye.

Hello and welcome to news of You once again from our lock down home temporary studios.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 virtual unthinkable mash mush headline news

The Proms: Music festival from home - News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/08
Video vocabulary