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  • Herrine Ro: Hi, everyone. If you've seen

  • my previous video on how to upgrade pancake mix,

  • video's up there,

  • you would know that I learned a lot of tips and tricks

  • from chef Neil Kleinberg from Clinton St. Baking Co.

  • Neil Kleinberg: Don't make them too big,

  • 'cause then they're gonna run into each other.

  • Herrine: So, the first time I had the famous pancakes

  • at Clinton St. was back in February,

  • and they were phenomenal.

  • Wow.

  • This restaurant in New York City

  • is famous for its pancakes.

  • People normally wait hours just to get a taste.

  • So, I thought it'd be a great idea

  • for you pancake fans out there

  • to make another video

  • including all those extra bonus tidbits.

  • [Skype connection theme playing]

  • Hi! Y'all are upstate now?

  • Neil: Yeah, you're in Cape Cod?

  • Herrine: Yes, it's so much -

  • Neil: I see the ocean in the background.

  • Herrine: That is the marsh,

  • and then Neil: No, I'm joking. [laughs]

  • up front

  • is the beach.

  • Ready to talk pancakes?

  • Neil: Sure.

  • Herrine: The first method that I tried

  • was just adding ginger ale

  • instead of water.

  • Have you ever done that, or have you ever

  • heard of that kind of [both laughing] tactic?

  • Neil: Is this a spoof or put-on or what?

  • Herrine: The next thing I did was make

  • a pancake breakfast casserole.

  • So I basically used the pancake mix

  • as, like, the binding factor for a casserole

  • that had bacon and cheddar cheese and eggs in it.

  • Neil: [laughs] That sounds like a nightmare.

  • I would keep those items separate.

  • I would make the pancakes and then not do a casserole

  • but do a side of scrambled eggs with cheddar in it

  • and a side of bacon and then call it day.

  • Herrine: Honestly tasted kind of like a McGriddle,

  • if you can believe it.

  • Neil: I don't even know what a McGriddle is.

  • Herrine: What do you recommend I make with the pancake mix?

  • Neil: I think we should make the Clinton St.

  • famous blueberry pancakes at home

  • using a box mix,

  • and this is the way I would do it.

  • If you're gonna get a mix,

  • get something that has

  • the basic dry ingredients in a regular pancake mix

  • that you're making from scratch,

  • flour, sugar, salt, baking powder, baking soda.

  • Herrine: The only pancake mix that I was able to find,

  • which was difficult in and of itself,

  • was this one. Have you ever seen it?

  • Neil: Oh, Krusteaz!

  • Never heard of it.

  • [Herrine laughs]

  • Herrine: We're looking at things like

  • thiamin mononitrate, riboflavin,

  • soybean oil, egg whites, and buttermilk.

  • Neil: OK, well, that's not bad.

  • Those things are dried,

  • so they took those items and they kind of

  • [sucks air] [clucks] dried them,

  • so you have everything in a mix.

  • And we're going to,

  • with a mix,

  • embellish and make them really, really

  • as good-tasting and as good-looking as we possibly can.

  • Now, the key in making something delicious

  • from a box of something

  • is to add things to it to enhance the flavor,

  • the texture, and the way they come out.

  • Herrine: What kind of ingredients

  • would you recommend me adding to this

  • to zhuzh it up?

  • Neil: Sour cream, maybe.

  • Maybe some regular buttermilk.

  • Maybe enhance it, because it has dried buttermilk in it,

  • something fatty

  • that's gonna give it a luxurious flavor.

  • So, whatever the instructions are on the mix,

  • you're gonna follow them.

  • But you're also gonna add,

  • what does it say on that box?

  • Herrine: It's just adding in cold water.

  • Neil: No, you should add the cold water,

  • and then you should add some buttermilk

  • if you can find it.

  • Take 1/3 a cup of water out,

  • and in place of it, add 1/3 cup of buttermilk.

  • If you can't find buttermilk,

  • then take 1/3 cup of a spoon of sour cream

  • with a little regular milk mixed in.

  • You should wind up with 2/3 cup of liquid.

  • You can add an extra egg.

  • It will make it much richer.

  • Herrine: Would it be too much

  • if I added some vanilla extract in there

  • or, like, some cinnamon?

  • Neil: You know, extract would be fine.

  • Cinnamon, eh, then you're gonna

  • turn the pancakes a color by adding cinnamon.

  • If you wanna do anything at the end, you know,

  • if you're making sliced bananas in the pancakes

  • and you wanna sprinkle some cinnamon sugar

  • over the top at the end,

  • that's perfectly fine.

  • But if you add any spices that are dark to the batter,

  • you're gonna have a dark batter,

  • and then they're not gonna look that great.

  • Herrine: And if I were to put in vanilla extract,

  • just a little, like, cap?

  • Neil: Yeah, a cap. That goes a long way,

  • and it won't color the batter.

  • Herrine: So, let batter stand for two minutes.

  • Neil: OK, perfect.

  • There should still be lumps in the batter.

  • And then you let it rest.

  • Herrine: What is the purpose of letting it rest?

  • Neil: Well, you're letting it rest

  • so you can pull the flavors together

  • and you can actually form a batter.

  • And if you go too quick in the pan,

  • then the molecules of the liquid and the dry

  • won't have a chance to meld.

  • Well, the best way to cook the pancakes

  • is to have a flat surface,

  • preferably a grill

  • or a large cast-iron pan

  • or a large flat pan

  • that doesn't have sloped sides.

  • Herrine: I'm trying to think, like,

  • what I have in my arsenal right now.

  • I do not have a skillet. I do not have a griddle.

  • I have, like, a large

  • saucepan.

  • Neil: OK.

  • That's fine. Herrine: OK. [laughs]

  • Neil: So, get the large saucepan hot

  • by turning on the flame

  • and then lowering the flame so it's hot to the touch,

  • like, a bead of water

  • would bubble up on it. [pan sizzles]

  • Herrine: I think it's definitely hot enough.

  • Neil: Then, at that point,

  • add a generous amount of butter,

  • like a pat of butter,

  • maybe 1/2 a tablespoon or something like that

  • and swirl it around the pan

  • till it starts to get foamy but not brown.

  • That's the point at which you're gonna put

  • a spoon or a ladle full of pancake mix in the pan.

  • A key characteristic of a great pancake

  • is to have that golden ring around it

  • when you first flip it,

  • and in order to to get that,

  • you have to put enough fat on the pan.

  • If you have a large pan like you're describing at home,

  • kind of use that large pan as a clock.

  • Start the first pancake at 12 o'clock,

  • then the next one at 3 o'clock,

  • then the next one at 6 o'clock,

  • and then the next one at 9 o'clock.

  • Don't make them too big

  • 'cause then they're gonna run into each other.

  • Then let it cook, medium heat.

  • Herrine: How many times should I flip the pancakes?

  • Neil: Never flip them more than once.

  • Herrine: Why is that?

  • Neil: They're gonna become tough,

  • and they're gonna get burnt.

  • They're not gonna cook properly.

  • Let the pancake cook.

  • You'll start to see the bubbles come up.

  • That's the point at when you add your filling.

  • Remember when we did them together at the restaurant,

  • we put a good amount of butter on them,

  • clarified butter and some whole butter,

  • so that the pancake would get a nice golden ring around it?

  • When the cake is kind of halfway cooked,

  • when you could actually peek under it with a spatula

  • and see that is a golden brown edge

  • and the bubbles start to form on the top,

  • that's when you add blueberries.

  • We use wild Maine blueberries that have a very short season,

  • but we get them frozen.

  • And they're wonderful frozen because they're tiny

  • and they pack full of flavor.

  • You should get them,

  • and then sprinkle them into the pancake

  • while they're on the griddle.

  • If you can't find those,

  • then the cultivated regular frozen blueberries

  • are really good.

  • Actually, frozen fruit is really good in a pancake

  • because they don't overcook

  • and they cook into the batter

  • and they hold their shape really well.

  • And if you can't find that,

  • then fresh blueberries are always around.

  • Herrine: Definitely sweeter than your regular blueberries.

  • Is there, like, a rule of what's too much?

  • Neil: Yeah, it's too much if they're not,

  • you know, spaced out correctly,

  • and then the pancake itself is not gonna cook properly.

  • And then with a spatula just flip each one

  • and then don't push it down,

  • and then in about a minute or two

  • they should be cooked on the bottom.

  • Herrine: Now I just gotta flip it. Moment of truth.

  • [groans]

  • Ugh, no. F---.

  • I can see why he didn't want a pan with sloped sides.

  • [pan sizzling]

  • I got!

  • I got four golden rings!

  • [pan sizzling]

  • After I'm done with the pancakes,

  • is there any other way that I can make this pancake meal

  • even more delicious?

  • Neil: Yeah, we're gonna make maple butter.

  • That's our trademark syrup,

  • and there's a very easy, great technique of how to make it.

  • Herrine: I've never made an emulsification before.

  • Neil: You can't go wrong. Even if the pancakes suck,

  • this maple butter will make them delicious.

  • Herrine: OK. [laughs]

  • Hopefully I don't...

  • it sounds very easy,

  • and I hope that I don't mess it up.

  • Neil: You won't mess it up.

  • Take a small saucepan,

  • take a half a cup of really good maple syrup,

  • and then have a little whisk

  • and take a quarter,

  • a stick of butter

  • or a half a stick of butter sliced in some pats,

  • and then as the maple syrup is getting warm,

  • one pat at a time,

  • whisk the butter

  • into the maple syrup until it melts.

  • Herrine: I am alarmed

  • at the amount of butter that is in this.

  • Neil: And the sauce should be caramellike in color.

  • It can be light or darker caramel,

  • depending on the maple syrup.

  • Herrine: So, at Clinton St.,

  • the maple butter is, like, still very liquidy.

  • It's not like a whipped maple butter,

  • and it has a very, like,

  • pale, light yellow,

  • light brown color,

  • and I think it's almost getting there.

  • Neil: You can get a grade B, which is a dark amber.