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  • Hello, guys.

  • Welcome back to this English course on nouns.

  • In this video, I'm going to tell you about countable and uncountable nouns.

  • It's very important to know the difference between countable and uncountable nouns in

  • English.

  • And students often get confused.

  • So please listen to me very carefully.

  • Let's get started.

  • Countable nouns are nouns that you can count.

  • Uncountable nouns are nouns that you cannot count.

  • They're usually a type or a group.

  • And they're always singular.

  • Let's look at a few examples.

  • Countable nounsyou can say, “a dog.”

  • You can say, “one dog,” “two dogs,” “three dogs,” and so on.

  • Man.”

  • You can say, “a man.”

  • Two men.”

  • Idea.”

  • You can say, “one idea,” “two ideas,” and so on.

  • Computer.”

  • Again, you can say, “one computer, two computers.”

  • And, “house.”

  • Well, you can say, “one house, two houses, three houses,” and so on.

  • These are countable nouns.

  • You can count them.

  • But if we look at uncountable nouns.

  • When you say, “water.”

  • You can't say, “One water, two waters.”

  • It doesn't make any sense.

  • You cannot count water.

  • Same goes for air.

  • You can't say, “one air, two airs.”

  • It's just 'air'.

  • It's uncountable.

  • 'traffic' 'English'

  • 'Equipment' These are all uncountable nouns.

  • You cannot count them And they're always singular.

  • Okay, guys.

  • Now, let's take a closer look at rules with countable nouns and uncountable nouns.

  • So how do we know if a word is countable or uncountable?

  • Well there are a few tricks that can help.

  • Let's look at these words.

  • Some groups of words are very often uncountable.

  • And this can help you.

  • For example, liquids.

  • Water, juice, milk, beer.

  • All those words are uncountable.

  • Powders.

  • Sugar, flour, salt, rice.

  • Uncountable words as well.

  • Materials.

  • Such as wood, plastic, metal, or paper.

  • Food as well.

  • Like fruit, meat, cheese, and bread.

  • And finally, abstract ideas.

  • Like time, information, love, and beauty.

  • Another trick is that most of the time, you can measure uncountable nouns.

  • Let's look at examples.

  • For example, if we take liquids.

  • I have two liters of milk.

  • Now, you cannot count milk.

  • But you can measure milk.

  • And you can count liters.

  • So you can say, “I have two liters of milk.”

  • You can say, “I have a glass of water.”

  • Or “I have glasses of water.”

  • Cups of coffee.”

  • Bottles of water.”

  • So you can measure this uncountable noun.

  • Same goes with powders.

  • “I have one kilogram of sugar.”

  • Two kilograms of sugar.”

  • With materials and foods, we often use the word, 'piece'.

  • For example, “I ate two pieces of cake.”

  • Or bread.

  • Or pizza.

  • Or meat.

  • Or cheese.

  • “I need pieces of paper.”

  • Wood.

  • Plastic.

  • Metal.

  • Or “I have some water.”

  • 'Some' is an article that always works with uncountable nouns.

  • Ok guys, I hope you understand.

  • Let's move on.

  • Some words can be both countable and uncountable nouns.

  • Now not all of them.

  • But some of them.

  • Let's take a look.

  • “I would like to eat some cake.”

  • “I would like two pieces of cake.”

  • So in these two sentences, 'cake' is obviously and uncountable noun.

  • But if I say, “I would like to eat two cakes.”

  • Suddenly, it becomes a countable noun.

  • Why?

  • Because in the first two sentences, we are talking about pieces of one cake.

  • In the last sentence, we are considering the whole cake.

  • So it becomes countable.

  • Another example.

  • “I would like to eat some chicken.”

  • “I would like to eat a piece of chicken.”

  • Both sentences, uncountable noun, 'chicken'.

  • But the last sentence, “I see two chickens.”

  • Hmm, 'chicken', in this case, is a countable noun.

  • Why?

  • Because in the first two sentences, 'chicken' is food.

  • But in the last sentence, 'chicken' is an animal.

  • So the animal is a countable noun.

  • 'Chicken' as food is uncountable.

  • Hope you get it.

  • Let's move on to example sentences now.

  • Let's now review a few example sentences, so you can practice using countable and uncountable

  • nouns.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • And be careful to use proper pronunciation.

  • Let's get started.

  • First sentence guys.

  • “I put one hundred candles on six cakes.”

  • Please repeat after me.

  • “I put one hundred candles on six cakes.”

  • “I put one hundred candles on six cakes.”

  • Good job.

  • Second example.

  • “I ate two pieces of cake.”

  • Please repeat after me.

  • “I ate two pieces of cake.”

  • “I ate two pieces of cake.”

  • Next sentence.

  • “I saw some trash on all the streets.”

  • Please repeat after me.

  • “I saw some trash on all the streets.”

  • “I saw some trash on all the streets.”

  • Very good.

  • Next one.

  • “I need to buy some milk and some butter from the market.”

  • Please repeat after me.

  • “I need to buy some milk and some butter from the market.”

  • “I need to buy some milk and some butter from the market.”

  • And finally.

  • Traffic and pollution are problems in many cities.”

  • Repeat after me.

  • Traffic and pollution are problems in many cities.”

  • Traffic and pollution are problems in many cities.”

  • Good job guys.

  • I hope you repeated after me and worked on your pronunciation.

  • Thank you for watching this video.

  • I hope you now have a better understanding of countable and uncountable nouns.

  • I know it's hard, but don't worry, keep practicing.

  • Practice makes perfect.

  • Thank you for watching my video and please watch the rest of the videos.

  • Thank you guys for watching my video.

  • If you liked it, please show me your support by clicking 'like', by subscribing to

  • the channel, by putting your comments below and sharing this video.

  • Thank you very much and see you.

  • And do it.

  • Countable nouns are nouns that you can count.

  • Ok, so for example, if you say 'a dog', you can say, “a dog, one dog, two dogs,

  • three dogs.”

  • You can count them.

  • Uncountable nouns

  • Stop, you gotta slow down.

  • Ahh, sorry.

  • Why am I going so fast?

  • Slow down.

  • Take your time.

  • Make it a good video.

  • Okay.

  • Countable nouns are nouns that you can count.

Hello, guys.

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B1 uncountable countable cake count milk noun

English Grammar Course Countable and Uncountable Nouns #5

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    Summer posted on 2020/11/05
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