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  • - Hello, hi, I'm Mark and in this video

  • we're just gonna be talkin' about rainbows

  • and, basically, what I'm gonna do is...

  • Let me just show you.

  • Whoo.

  • Rainbows, it's rainbows.

  • (smooth music)

  • Because who doesn't like rainbows?

  • Rainbows are commonly known as the symbol

  • of hope, peace, pride, the LGBTQ flag.

  • It's the symbol that God's

  • never gonna flood the earth again.

  • And there may be a pot of gold at the end of it.

  • So my entire goal for this video is to fill this whole room

  • up with rainbows, minus the gold coin.

  • I mean, that could be cool.

  • And we're gonna try to do three pretty simple experiments

  • to try to accomplish this.

  • But before we jump into our experiments,

  • I do want to understand

  • and try to learn how rainbows are made.

  • (keys tapping)

  • How are rainbows made?

  • So I want to share with you the things that I've learned

  • and please correct me if I'm ever wrong.

  • And I'll try my best to keep it simple.

  • When I'm talkin' about rainbows,

  • I'm talkin' about the whole range of colors

  • visible to the human eye.

  • And this rainbow is what we see after that rain,

  • like what we see in the sky.

  • Wow (muffled speaking).

  • Now sunlight, we perceive as white,

  • but it's actually the whole spectrum of colors combined.

  • Knowing this, how can we take all the colors

  • from the light and then spread 'em out, make a rainbow?

  • How does the rain do it?

  • Well, whenever light passes through a material

  • such as glass or water, like rain, refraction can occur,

  • meaning it changes direction and speed.

  • And that actually spreads the wavelength of light.

  • When you spread the wavelength of light,

  • you see all the visible colors,

  • like the spectrum, which is rainbow.

  • (light music)

  • I hope that all makes sense

  • and I just want to jump into our first experiment

  • 'cause we're running out of light.

  • (tinkly crescendo)

  • So our first test, or experiment,

  • is gonna be with a prism.

  • (rhythmic techno music)

  • Let me show you my setup.

  • So I have, I'm just reflecting light off of this glass

  • so that it can go through this prism,

  • bounce off over here,

  • it's hard to see on the phone,

  • but it makes two rainbows right there.

  • Our prism's right there, hanging,

  • and it's actually sending rainbow all the way down here.

  • And just for funsies, for later,

  • here's a little snippet of what we're gonna be doin'.

  • Oh, wow!

  • Woo! Oh, yeah.

  • Here's another variant of the prism.

  • It's this thing.

  • And I believe these crystals work

  • just kinda like a prism

  • but it just makes a lot more rainbows, tinier ones.

  • Little fun fact, back in the day they thought prisms

  • would color light, kinda like a stained glass.

  • Isaac Newton actually proved this wrong.

  • So the experiment that he did,

  • let me see if I can recreate it.

  • I'm gonna go close up real quick.

  • Here's a little quick experiment to show you

  • that this is not staining the light.

  • You just let one single color to go through this slit.

  • And the idea is if you get another prism

  • and you put it on that color,

  • if it colors the light,

  • it should be a rainbow, right, but no.

  • Let's try a different color, let's try blue.

  • Blue green, that's kinda cool.

  • This shows that the prism is not coloring the light.

  • But we're gonna keep moving on and

  • let's go to our next experiment.

  • This looks cool.

  • (tinkly crescendo)

  • Our next experiment involves CDs, just need a CD.

  • You can already see the rainbows in it.

  • And hope I'm seeing some rainbow on the ceiling,

  • but you probably can't see that.

  • Where's my rainbow?

  • I'm seeing a little bit of rainbow,

  • I don't know if...

  • Oh wait, can you see that on camera right there?

  • Sort of similar to the prism,

  • the CD spreads the colors of the light.

  • And it's because of what's called grating diffraction.

  • Sort of simple terms, the CD has

  • these super micro gratings that are evenly spaced out

  • and when the sun hits it and bounces around,

  • it's able to spread these colors.

  • So if you bend it a little bit,

  • kind of combines all the color

  • and makes it more vivid.

  • Wonder if I can, like, break this into little pieces

  • and actually make a disco ball with it?

  • (CD pops) Oh!

  • (tinkly music)

  • (Mark laughing)

  • Won't break.

  • (hammer smacking) That's all I did to it.

  • (wrench smashes)

  • (sighs) Let's move on.

  • For our next fact, I want to quickly

  • talk about the colors of the rainbow, or ROYGBIV.

  • Why ROYGBIV?

  • And if you've never heard of it,

  • it's red, orange, yellow,

  • green, blue, indigo, violet?

  • I hope I got that right.

  • Whenever you see a rainbow, you'll notice

  • it's in this order of ROYGBIV, and why is that?

  • Basically it all comes down to wavelengths.

  • And all the colors that you're seeing

  • are the different wavelengths of that light,

  • from red having longer wavelengths,

  • meaning it has lower energy,

  • towards violet has higher energy, or shorter wavelengths.

  • And beyond that is something that our eyes can't see.

  • (light rhythmic music)

  • Makes me think about if you're colorblind,

  • how do you see rainbows?

  • Or if you are an animal that can see

  • a different range of spectrum, what's that world like?

  • I digress, I just think light is so fascinating

  • that something so simple that we see everyday

  • can get so complex.

  • Well, let's move on.

  • (tinkly crescendo)

  • So the sun has moved forward even more

  • and this works perfect for our third experiment,

  • which is my favorite.

  • We just need water.

  • (water splashing) Ah, no oh. (stammering)

  • So fill it up with water

  • and the only other thing that we need is a mirror.

  • The light bounces off the mirror

  • and the water actually refracts it,

  • so the water is the one that's slowing down the light

  • and spreads it out so we can have a rainbow.

  • There is actually a specific angle that works.

  • Ooh, oh oh oh, wait wait wait.

  • It's working.

  • Oh, there it is.

  • Let me show you what's going on.

  • Water, glass, you can actually see a little bit of rainbow

  • right there, reflecting all the way over there.

  • It looks, it looks dope.

  • I'm gonna touch this, sphew.

  • And then, boom.

  • It just comes to life

  • and they're just mesmerizing how they're moving.

  • The gradation is so smooth.

  • I love it, I love it.

  • (peaceful music)

  • (full chord)

  • With all this rainbow science,

  • what can we actually do with it,

  • besides appreciating its beauty?

  • Well, we could actually use this to study the universe,

  • which is amazing to me.

  • And it's achieved with something

  • called (stammering) spectroscopy.

  • It's where scientists use a device called spectroscope

  • and this device can capture light from space

  • and actually use the same idea

  • that we've been doing with our experiments,

  • splitting our light and spreading the spectrum.

  • And this rainbow spectrum actually

  • contains information that we can analyze and figure out

  • what elements this light has interacted with.

  • So basically, we're figuring out what's

  • out there in the universe by reading a rainbow.

  • Anyways, I basically want to use everything

  • that I've learned about rainbows to create them

  • and then paint my room, my apartment, with rainbows.

  • Hopefully it'll work, so we'll see.

  • (tinkly music)

  • So you can see if I'm dispersing that.

  • (upbeat music)

  • I'll just put some of the CDs.

  • It's very subtle, but it's there.

  • That's awesome.

  • I was this close to finishing it up.

  • Unfortunately, we ran out of time.

  • There's no more sunlight inside our room.

  • But there's always tomorrow,

  • so I'm gonna try again tomorrow.

  • I've been running around trying to set up this rainbow

  • 'cause the light keeps shifting and it keeps changing

  • but I'm gonna quickly show you what I got.

  • All right, you ready for this?

  • (latch rattles)

  • (light rhythmic music)

  • Check that out, that's so cool.

  • So cool, like a party in here.

  • So I have the crystals that my partner,

  • Elizabeth, has and I combined them.

  • I have a couple of prisms.

  • I have some crazy contraption, I have all of these.

  • And look at that, the CDs, I actually think

  • it's such a great job with that rainbow.

  • Look at all that.

  • - All right.

  • - [Mark] What do you think?

  • - Whoa, it's a party in here.

  • Whoa, you can even like see it.

  • - [Mark] Oh, that's so cool.

  • (thoughtful music)

  • Look at your crystals.

  • - Whoa, look at the wall.

  • Woo, that's so cool.

  • - [Mark] I just wanted to see how far I could push it.

  • It's all fading slowly.

  • I mean, there's still some.

  • - Yeah, but it's kinda cool how it's constantly changing.

  • - Yeah. (tinkly music)

  • Overall, I thought it was pretty successful

  • and it was pretty amazing,

  • pretty magical, I'd say.

  • Obviously, the sun keeps moving, so every couple minutes,

  • that rainbow would shift and change

  • so I have to switch all the mirrors and the prisms.

  • It was a lot of work,

  • but the results were pretty amazing.

  • I learned so much from our experiments

  • and I hope that you did, too.

  • I just think that it's so cool with,

  • like, something so simple

  • we could create something beautiful.

  • Well, hopefully you liked the video

  • as much as I had fun making it

  • and that it inspires you

  • to bring a little bit of color in your space.

  • Peace. (quiet music)

  • (tinkly crescendo)

  • (gentle music)

- Hello, hi, I'm Mark and in this video

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/05
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