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  • Swizz Beatz: I got it.

  • So are you guys going to mute when I talk

  • so nothing interrupts it?

  • Voice: Uhh, yes.

  • SB: Because once I'm in the flow, I like to stay in the flow.

  • Having some type of support

  • is very necessary when you are creative.

  • You know, there has to be something that's fueling that creativity,

  • that's fueling that fire that you have inside.

  • My love for music and creativity starts way back, way back.

  • Back in the South Bronx where I grew up,

  • building 700, apartment 2E.

  • I would go outside and all I would hear is music.

  • You go around to the back park, the DJs are playing,

  • there's a basketball game going on,

  • but then you would look at the handball court,

  • and that handball court would have an amazing graffiti mural,

  • I don't know if it's from Keith Haring or Fab 5 Freddy.

  • I was instantly attracted to the creative.

  • Music has been my therapy since day one.

  • Anytime I get stressed out,

  • I go to the arts, I go to creativity, I go to music.

  • Music makes people feel hugged, people feel loved.

  • And then I remember one of my uncles saying,

  • "You should get into producing," I'm like, "What's producing?"

  • You know, it started as a family-owned business,

  • because Ruff Ryders was created by my family.

  • It gave you DMX, it gave you Eve,

  • it gave you Drag-On, it gave you The LOX.

  • I've gotten every accolade in music that one can get.

  • It just came to the point where it's like, "You know what?

  • I'm no longer going to have fun with this unless I'm able to give back."

  • You know, The Dean Collection started for me to create a museum for my family

  • and our name.

  • Something that my kids would have to be responsible

  • to pass through generations.

  • I said, "Wait a minute,

  • The Dean Collection is not just for The Dean Collection,

  • The Dean Collection is for everyone."

  • There are some galleries now and places you walk in,

  • if you don't have 50,000, there's nothing to talk about.

  • And I felt that a lot of people were using that as an excuse

  • to exit art.

  • They feel that art is only for rich people.

  • Whoa.

  • We've got to stop this, we've got to fix this.

  • And that's what made me and my wife say,

  • you know, we have to create an entry point to the younger generation

  • that didn't understand the art world,

  • didn't have their seat at the table,

  • and then we started "No Commissions."

  • It's a big event,

  • you got 30-something-thousand RSVPs a night.

  • The drinks are free, the food is free,

  • the concert's free.

  • The education is free,

  • and I feel that education should be free.

  • We went to Shanghai, we went to London,

  • we went to Berlin,

  • we did it right in my backyard in the South Bronx.

  • You can come in to "No Commissions"

  • and get something for a couple of bucks,

  • or a couple hundred thousand.

  • There's a tier for every person that has love for art.

  • And what we're doing is something totally different from a gallery.

  • The artists keep 100 percent of the sales.

  • But what about after "No Commissions,"

  • how can you sustain, how can you move forward

  • without having to be trapped to sell your soul?

  • I was a part of the sale with my brother Sean "Diddy" Combs,

  • the 21-million-dollar purchase,

  • which made Kerry James Marshall

  • the highest-selling African American living artist to today.

  • I'm like, "Man, you just broke the record,"

  • and the artist was like,

  • "Yeah, I don't know whether to be happy or to be sad."

  • He first sold that work, it was under 100,000.

  • So imagine a work that you made for under 100,000

  • is now being sold for 21 million,

  • and you had to sit home and watch this.

  • And you couldn't even participate five percent.

  • When you look at it,

  • I'm a producer, I'm a songwriter,

  • every time it's played on the radio,

  • I get paid.

  • Every time it's played in a movie,

  • I get paid.

  • Every time it plays, period,

  • I get paid.

  • Visual artists, they only get paid once.

  • How, when paintings are sold and traded multiple times?

  • And that's that artist's lifetime work,

  • that other people are making 10, 15,

  • sometimes 100 times more than the artist that created it.

  • So I created something called the Dean's Choice,

  • where if you're a seller,

  • or a collector,

  • and you bring in your work into, let's say, Sotheby's,

  • there's a paper that's there that says, "Hey, guys, you know,

  • this artist is still living.

  • You've made 300 percent on your investment

  • by working with this artist.

  • You can choose to give the artist whatever you want of the sale."

  • I think that even if five people did it,

  • it'll start to change everything in the arts.

  • And this is happening in Europe already.

  • It happens in the music industry,

  • it's called publishing.

  • And artists are able to survive,

  • musicians are able to survive,

  • years after years,

  • off of the residual income of their publishing.

  • So how can we take something that brings creatives together,

  • and celebrate each other?

  • Myself and Timbaland have been working on this idea

  • called Verzuz for about three years now.

  • Then this trying time came,

  • and everybody started going to social media

  • to express themselves.

  • So what we did was I played my top songs,

  • he played his top songs,

  • and we went on Instagram Live.

  • (Video) (Laughter)

  • Timbaland: You having fun?

  • This is so good for the culture.

  • SB: A lot of people like to say "battle,"

  • we pulled back off of that word "battle,"

  • because we're battling enough in the world today.

  • We call it educational celebration.

  • I think we're on our ninth or tenth one.

  • Me and Timbaland started out with 20,000 people.

  • As of yesterday, 750,000 people in one room.

  • So, we have this thing called the "Verzuz Effect."

  • And the "Verzuz Effect" is what happens to the artist

  • after they contribute to Verzuz.

  • We can go to the Babyface and Teddy Riley.

  • They both went up millions of views.

  • Both of their songs reentered the charts.

  • And then we look at the first ladies Verzuz,

  • and both Erykah Badu and Jill Scott

  • have seven positions in the top 20 charts.

  • This is the Verzuz Effect.

  • You know, billions and billions and billions of impressions.

  • This is something I've never seen before.

  • And I felt that these artists are getting their flowers today,

  • which is a great thing, while they can smell them.

  • This was personal for me,

  • because many a times I've been counted out,

  • I've been hot and cold 100 times.

  • You still have to understand the business as an artist,

  • to elevate to your level that you deserve to be.

  • Because most creatives, we're very emotional,

  • we're very "let somebody else handle that, I want to stick to this."

  • But not only creativity is key, education is key,

  • which is the reason why I went back to school

  • to sharpen my pencil in my mid-30s.

  • We have to know our business.

  • But it's going to take us digging in a little deeper

  • and pulling out the knowledge that we need to prepare ourselves

  • for this world that's waiting to take advantage of the creatives.

  • Then we can make better choices,

  • then we can end that conversation of artists dying poor.

  • If we're not protecting the arts,

  • we're not protecting our future,

  • we're not protecting this world.

  • Creativity heals us.

  • What's these shades closing for?

  • Time out.

  • (Scoffs)

  • Voice: I kind of like that. That was cool.

  • SB: (Laughs)

Swizz Beatz: I got it.

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A2 artist creativity dean sb music collection

How to support and celebrate living artists | Swizz Beatz

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/05
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