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  • (owl noises lol)

  • Today I'm teaching you guys how to make miso soup,

  • But

  • more importantly, I'm also teaching you how to make dashi.

  • That doesn't sound as impressive 'til I explain what it is.

  • Dashi is the classic cooking stock used in a lot of Japanese cuisine.

  • Once you learn how to make this, you can make TONS of other dishes,

  • and I will forever, constantly refer you back to this video if you're like:

  • ''How do I make dashi???''

  • and I'll be like,

  • ''Go back to the miso soup video.''

  • It's super easy to make, but your house will smell a bit like Neptune's anus.

  • That's right, I said it.

  • Otherwise, if you have any cats, they will be super happy with what's going on.

  • Let's get started!

  • And by ''get started'' I mean

  • (sipping)

  • I need to drink some of this...

  • apple juice.

  • With ice cubes and a straw.

  • NOT Bourbon.

  • And ginger a-

  • It's Bourbon and ginger ale.

  • It's delicious.

  • aaAAH.

  • Now before we make miso soup, we have to make dashi, the cooking stock first.

  • Now, yesterday night, I started my dashi.

  • This is not it yet, but this is kombu,

  • which is a special seaweed used to make it.

  • Just soaking in normal, filtered water.

  • You don't have to soak it over night,

  • but if you soak it over night the flavours are so much richer and better.

  • You can make it like, right away on the stove top and, it'll be okay,

  • but this is the best way to do it.

  • The reason why this is the better way to do it is because

  • kombu is covered in all types of, like, minerals and a natural form of MSG

  • is actually on this in it's real life form.

  • You might see it looking kind of like a little bit white or grey,

  • you don't want to wash that off,

  • that's actually really important to the flavour.

  • You guys might have heard people talking about Japanese food as being like,

  • umami.

  • And that umami flavour often comes from this kind of a natural ingredient.

  • This is the basis for what people copy the taste of MSG.

  • Now, kombu is seaweed.

  • But I don't want you to mistake it for other kinds of seaweed.

  • Like, you guys might have this kind hanging around your house,

  • you might have seen this before for like wrapping up sushi rolls and stuff.

  • This is roasted seaweed and you absolutely CANNOT use this as a replacement.

  • It doesn't have anything on it,

  • and it will just turn into like, mush and be totally disgusting.

  • It's also not this seaweed, which is wakame.

  • And wakame is actually those seaweed pieces you have when you're actually drinking miso soup.

  • This is rehydrated and it will look a lot nicer.

  • I personally do not like that texture or taste of seaweed.

  • Didn't like it in Korea, do not like it in my miso soup,

  • but for the sake of making authentic miso soup, I bought this for you guys! (Triumphant and victorious music playing)

  • Personally I think it tastes like mermaid toilet paper.

  • But you know what, everyone has their own thing.

  • So for four cups, about a liter of filtered tap water,

  • I put in around 2 to 4 pieces of kombu.

  • I can't tell you the exact amount, because

  • when you buy your kombu, you might buy them in big sheets,

  • you might buy them in tiny squares.

  • So it really depends on what you're buying.

  • But it's kind of like,

  • four cups is gonna be like,

  • an iPhone 7's worth of kombu.

  • Originally I was like:

  • ''I'll describe it like a phone, but what if you have a Galaxy?''

  • ''What if you have a thinner phone?''

  • So think of it like,

  • this is how much you kind of want to put in,

  • if you have 4 cups.

  • Also,

  • this recipe is really cool, because as you taste your soup when you make it,

  • you can say:

  • ''I didn't like that, it had too much seaweed flavour.''

  • and you can redo it again as you go.

  • So it's a really kind of a personal preference.

  • But, I'll get you started with the basic recipe.

  • Next up I wanna talk to you guys about bonito flakes, also known as katsuobushi.

  • So in English we call them bonito flakes, which apparently is not even right,

  • because it's not even the right fish.

  • But basically it's like a dried skipjack tuna or something,

  • that's been like, preserved and filled with mold like a cheese,

  • and then taken out again and then filled with mold.

  • And then they like, break it down after hundreds of days and

  • then they shave it and eventually we get this.

  • I don't even know.

  • It basically just smells like smoked fish,

  • it has a really smoky flavour to it.

  • And that's natural!

  • ... after their days of aging. (lol)

  • This smoky flavour is extremely important to your soup.

  • You can add more or you can add less, depending on if you don't like the flavour.

  • You've definitely seen this before. It's usually, like, sprinkled on things like

  • takoyaki, the octopus/squid balls,

  • or like okonomiyaki.

  • And it looks like it's kind of like dancing and alive,

  • and it's not at all.

  • It's just that it's so thinly sliced, that the heat makes it kinda look like it's dancing.

  • We're gonna be using this as well.

  • These are really the only two things we need to make the base,

  • outside of the the water, the kombu and the katsuobushi.

  • We're gonna be thinking about miso next.

  • There are three different kinds of miso: there's red miso, brown miso and white miso.

  • When we went to Kyoto I found that the miso soup was really really sweet,

  • and I know that food changes regionally in Japan,

  • but it's because white miso is actually a lot younger and sweeter,

  • than brown miso or red miso.

  • Personally, because we've been to Tokyo more often, I prefer a brown miso based miso soup.

  • It's basically just kind of saltier in my opinion,

  • but I find that it was a bit too salty so I am mixing two different kinds together.

  • You can buy whatever kind you want, taste it, and if you find that it's too salty or too sweet,

  • get another one and see what that one is like as well.

  • So I'll be doing a brown miso mix with the white miso,

  • then you need to chop up some green onion and you need some soft tofu cut up into cubes.

  • And of course, your seaweed, rehydrated.

  • (mellow music playing)

  • ...which is totally gonna add so much flavour and texture to the soup...

  • (grossed-out sigh)

  • *sarcastic tone* Oh noooo, I accidentally tripped and it fell into the toileeet~

  • OKAyh!

  • Let's get cooking!

  • So I'm making this recipe for two to three people depending on the size of your bowls.

  • I've basically been measuring everything based on my tiny little miso bowl that I got from Daiso for one dollar!

  • So, this recipe is really like two to three of those bowls.

  • I'm gonna add two cups of my kombu water base,

  • and I'm gonna add in about 2 to 3 pieces of the actual kombu.

  • We're gonna bring it to a boil, and BEFORE it actually boils,

  • you gotta take the kombu out of the pan.

  • If you let it boil, it becomes like a slimy, disgusting-

  • *Harry Potter theme playing in the background* Really?!

  • So copywritten as well!

  • Hey Banana.

  • (from the phone) Yeah?

  • I'm really sorry to tell you this but I'm just right in the middle of filming,

  • I just wanted to pick up and say hi :3

  • Can you see Boo?

  • (Martina's sister) We'll find another time.

  • If you just wanna very quickly show me Ellington I'd be very happy.

  • (Martina's sister) *whispering* There.

  • M: *gasp*

  • (Martina's sister) There's Ellington :333

  • M: Hi little Ellington ~

  • *cooing* Hi!

  • Hi Ellington!

  • (Martina's sister) *pretending to be the baby* Hi MarMar!

  • *lolling*

  • (Martina's sister as the baby) How are you?

  • *more laughter*

  • I do that to Meemers all the time!

  • (Martina's sister) That's my favourite thing to do!

  • Yeah I'm like ''I'm not responsible for this'' (???)

  • Martina's sis: Okay, we'll talk to you later!

  • Kay bye guys! Love you lots!

  • My sister had a baby and I'm a new aunt! (Translators' note: Congratulations to you both!)

  • And now we have to figure out what aunt means in Japanese 'cause

  • I'm ee-mo (이모) to my niece because I was in Korea,

  • but now I'm in Japan! What's aunt???

  • We don't know ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

  • The key with this moment is to bring it to a boil

  • but just before it actually starts boiling,

  • we have to take the kombu out.

  • If you leave it in, it becomes really like, slimy,

  • and it becomes bitter-tasting

  • and it will completely ruin your soup.

  • If you taste your soup and it's bitter, that's because you left it in for too long.

  • So I've removed my kombu, the water is boiling.