A2 Basic 36 Folder Collection
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Hello everyone.
I'm Robin and welcome to Beginner 2.
Now, Beginner 2 is a little more difficult than Beginner 1, but that's ok because my
videos are very useful.
Very helpful.
They are real English.
So be sure to study them all.
Now, I'm going to give you a few tips or advice on how to study my videos.
The first thing I want to tell you to do…is to repeat.
Repeat after me.
Everything I say, you should try to follow me and say it the same speed and same style
as I do.
So, for example, if I say “How are you?”, you should repeat, “How are you?”.
If I say “What do you do?”, you should repeat “What do you do?”.
Repeating is very important to improving your English.
Also, most videos have example sentences, or example dialogues.
Ok…
These are also very important.
I'm going to teach you a lot of vocabulary and expressions and the example sentences
and example dialogues will help you understand how to use them in a sentence.
They'll also help you with the grammar.
Ok…
So be sure to focus and study, the example sentences, example dialogues.
Some videos will have a test.
A listening test.
Ok…
Be very serious.
These are important tests.
Ok…
So you should have paper and a pen and when the test starts, you should listen carefully
and write down the answer.
Now, if the test is going too fast, stop the video, ok… slow it down to your speed.
But the test is very important to helping your listening.
Alright…
Now, in the videos, I cannot teach you everything.
I did my best to teach you a lot of information, but it's not everything.
Ok…
You're still going to have a lot of questions…and you might be confused sometimes.
Ok…
So you have to do a lot of self-study.
After you watch the video, don't just rush to the next video.
You should do a little review.
Ok… and self-study.
Self-study is very important.
I can't do everything for you.
You can't learn English just by me.
You also have to self-study and practice it.
Alright, and the last thing I want to say is don't give up.
Ok…
Now, these videos can be a little difficult, but don't give up.
If you don't understand the video, watch it again…, but don't give up.
Keep going.
The only way to improve is if you keep going.
Alright….
And I know, I'm sure, after you watch my videos, re-watch them twice, your English
will get better.
This is real English, with real expressions.
Ok…
That's it and I hope you do well.
Good luck.
Hello everyone.
We are going to talk about basic greetings for when you meet someone you don't know.
Ok…
Someone you don't know is called a stranger.
So, when you meet the stranger, what do you say?
Ok..so these are basic greetings.
So, on the board here, I have the first basic greeting.
“Hi”.
Ok…this is a very casual greeting when you meet someone for the first time.
“Hi”.
Very simple.
The second one, “Hello”.
Oh, something wrong with the spelling here.
Be careful with the spelling of “hello”.
Many of my students put the 'W'.
There is never a 'w'.
It is only “hello”.
Ok…
Be careful with that.
So, of course, these are the most common greetings: “hi”, “hello”.
And here are three more greetings.
“Good morning”, “good afternoon”, and “good evening”.
Alright, so these are the most basic greetings when you meet the stranger.
And when you say “hi”, they will probably say the same thing.
“Hi”.
If you say “hello”, they will say the same thing.
“Hello”.
If you say “good morning”, they will say the same thing.
“Good morning”.
“Good afternoon”.
“Good evening”.
So, if they say “good evening” to you, you should answer, ”good evening”.
If they say “good morning” to you, you should answer “good morning”.
Alright…that's how we do our basic greetings with a stranger.
Alright, let's move on to some more greetings.
Ok…so we're going to look at two more greetings.
The next one is “how are you?”.
And this one…”how are you doing?.
Ok…both are very common.
You must know them.
“How are you?”.
“How are you doing?”.
“How are you?”.
“How are you doing?”.
So, someone asks you… these questions.
And you would answer, starting with “I'm”.
Ok…
I am…I'm.
I'm fine.
Ok…
So, I'm fine is the best answer.
It's the most common answer.
So, you should always try to say, “I'm fine”.
“How are you?”
“I'm fine.”
There are other answers.
“How are you?”
“I'm great.”
“I'm good.”
“I'm not bad.”
“I'm so so.”
Ok…but be careful with “so so”.
Many of my students say “so so” too much.
ok…
So, the best answer is “I'm fine.” and sometimes use these.
ok…
Maybe you're not fine.
So you want to express something bad.
So…
“How are you?”
“I'm bad.”
or…”How are you?”
“I'm not good.”
“How are you doing?”
“I'm not good.”
Alright…
So, someone asks the question, you answer and the polite thing to do is ask them the
same question.
So, “How are you?”
“I'm fine.”
And then we should use one of these.
Ok…”How are you?”
“I'm fine…..and you?”
ok..your asking them.
“How are you?”
“I'm fine….how about you?”
Ok, these mean the same thing.
So, you can use this one or this one.
Alright…let's take a look at a few examples…example dialogues, so we can understand this better.
Alright, let's look at example dialogue one.
“Good morning.”
“Good morning.”
Let's look at example dialogue two.
“How are you?”
“I'm good.
And you?”
“I'm fine.”
Let's look at example dialogue three.
“How are you doing?”
“Not bad.
What about you?”
“I'm pretty good.”
Let's look at example dialogue four.
“Good afternoon.
How are you?”
“Very well thank you.
And you?”
“I'm fine.”
Ok…I hope you have a good understanding of how to use basic greetings to someone you
don't know.
It's easy.
Alright…
Before we go, I want to talk about this expression.
“How are you?”
“I'm fine thank you, and you?”
Of course, every Korean knows this expression.
This is what you were taught in school.
But, of course, this is too common and too nice; too polite.
So, it's a little bit funny.
Ok…
So, “How are you?”
“I'm fine thank you, and you?”
Try not to use this.
Ok…
Let's make it easier.
uhhh, as I said, it's too nice, so let's cut the “thank you”.
Ok…
So, this sounds better already.
This is much better.
“How are you?”
“I'm fine, and you?”
ok…
That's better than “I'm fine thank you, and you?”
Alright…
So, that's basic greetings.
Uhhh, again I hope you understand and I'll see you next video.
Hello everyone.
In this video, we're going to talk about basic greetings you would use with people
you know.
With your friends.
Ok…
Now, let's take a look.
I have three here.
Now, we would use these in very casual situations.
ok…
We don't want to use these in business meetings or meeting some stranger who's very important.
You want to use this with.. uhhh.. people we know.
Very friendly people.
Alright…so the first one is “What's up?”
Ok..
So, “What's up?” you…”What's up?”
Ok, don't look up.
“What's up?” common greeting.
“What's up?” and “What's new?”
Very similar.
So, if someone asks you “What's up?”
That's their… kind of asking you “What are you doing now?”
Ok..so it could be “Hey, what's up?”
And you would answer, “Oh, I'm going out for dinner.”
Ok..so “What's up?
What are you doing?”
“Hey, what's up?”
“Uhhh, I'm about to go to a party.”
Ok…
With “What's new?”
“What's new?”
uhhhh….
maybe they haven't see you for like a week.
Ok, you haven't met your friend for one week.
You meet your friend and your friend says, “Hey, what's new?”
Ok…
“What's new?”
“What's new in your life?”
ok…
“What happened in one week?”
So, someone asks you, “What's new?”
And you would answer, “Well, I made a new girlfriend.”
Or…
“I went to a concert last Friday.”
ok…
“So, what's new with you?”
“Uhhh, I took a trip to Busan over the weekend.”
Ok…so someone asks, “What's new?”..kind of what happened in your life…since they
last saw you.
Alright…
And the last one, very friendly expression here, “How's it going?”
“How's it going?”
What is “it”?
“How's it going?”
Well, “it” is your life.
“How's your life going?”
Or similar to “How are you?”
“So how's your life going?”
“Are you doing well?”
Uhh, you would answer, you know, if someone asks, “How's it going?”
You would answer, “It's going great.”
“It's going well.”
“It's going fine.”
Ok…
“How's it going?”
“It's going wonderful.”
Alright…
So these are the first three.
Let's take a look at another three.
Alright…so here are three more expressions you can use when you're meeting your friend.
Uhhh, the first one…very nice, very polite, very friendly.
You say, “Good to see you.”
Ok…”Good to see you.”
or “Good to see you, again.”
Ok…so you haven't seen your friend.
You see your friend.
“Hi, good to see you.”
Ok…that's very friendly.
Let's look at the next one.
You meet your friend and your friend asks you, “How are things?”
“How are things?”
Ok…what are things?
“How are things?”
Now, “things”, those are things in your life.
So, what's happening in your life?.
“How's your life?”
Ok…”How are things?”
So, the “How are things?”, you would answer…
“Things are great.”
“Things are good.”
“Things are fine.”
Ok…”How are things?”
“Things are wonderful.”
or…
“Things are bad.”
Ok, so you can express that with “things”…
“How are things?”
“Things are so so.”
And the last one here.
“How's life?”
“Hey, how's life?”
“How's life?”, again very friendly.
Asking about your life is your life good, or is your life bad?
“How's life?”
You could say, “Life is good.”
“Life is great.”
or…”Life is terrible.”
Ok… not good.
Ok.. depends on your feeling.
So, these are three more to use with your friend.
Again, uhhh, not in a business situation, only with friendly people you know.
Alright, so let's take a look at some examples to understand these better.
Alright, so the first example…
“How's it going?”
“I'm good.
How are you?”
“I'm fine.”
The next example…
“Hey, what's up?”
“Nothing much.
How's it going?”
“Fine.”
And the next example.
“How are things with you?”
“Things are great!
And you?”
“I'm pretty good.”
The next example.
“How's it going?”
“I'm ok.
How about you?”
“I'm pretty good these days.”
And the last example.
“How's life?”
“Life's pretty good.
How about you?”
“Me, too.
Things are great.”
“How are you?”
Did you understand my example dialogues?
I hope so.
These are good expressions to use…speaking in English to your friend.
Alright, you should know them and you should practice them.
Anyway, that's it for this video.
See you next time.
Hello everyone.
In this video, we are going to talk about the basic ways to say, “good-bye.”
Alright…
Now, on the board are the three most common ways to say, “good-bye.”
You probably already know them.
The first one, “good-bye.”
Usually, we write this with a hyphen.
Ok…
“Good-bye.”
Now, a lot of my students are scared to say, “good-bye.”
Because they think, “good-bye”, is “good-bye forever.”
ok…
I'll never meet you again.
uhhh, or, I'm…I'll meet you in a very very long time.
That's not true.
ok…
“Good-bye” is very common and you can meet your friend, at the end of the evening,
say, “good-bye.”
And that doesn't mean “Good-bye forever.”
Ok…
So, don't be scared to say “Good-bye.”
The next one, of course we shorten it.
Make it short….to “Bye”.
Just “bye”.
Very simple.
Very easy.
Very common.
“Bye”.
Alright…
And, of course, in Korea, they like to say, “bye, bye”.
ok…
A lot of my students always say “bye, bye”.
“Bye, bye”.
“Bye, bye”.
They say it too much.
Alright…
You should say, “bye, bye”, sometimes, not every time.
ok…
So, try to say “bye” and “good-bye”.
Alright…
So, these three are the most common.
Let's move on to 'see you'.
Ok…let's look at the 'see you' expressions.
Now, “see you” is a very useful and excellent way to say “good-bye.”
Now, of course, you can just say very simple, “see you”.
ok…
That means “bye”.
You could also say, “see you soon”.
Ok…
“See you soon.”
We're going to meet soon.
Maybe later today, or tomorrow.
Anyway the time is short; soon.
ok…
“See you soon”.
“See you later”.
“See you later”.
Ok…
Now this one is special.
“See you later”.
And many people are confused because, “see you later”.
What is “later”?
Now, later today?
Tomorrow?
When is later?
“See you later”.
Alright…
Well, sometimes, people say, “see you later”.
That means later today.
Sometimes, they say, “see you later”.
That doesn't mean later today.
It means just “good-bye”.
Just “bye”.
ok…
So this one can be confusing.
So, when someone says, “see you later”, probably you're not going to meet later.
ok…
It's probably just “bye”.
Alright…the last one here, “see you….”.
You could put any time here.
“See you tonight”.
“See you tomorrow”.
“See you on the weekend”.
“See you on Friday”.
“See you next week”.
ok…
Very useful to tell the person, “good-bye” and when you will see them next.
Alright…
Let's move on to a few more examples of how to say, “good-bye”.
Ok, let's look at three more here.
This one.
“Cheers”.
Ok, a lot of students are confused because “cheers” has two meanings.
The first meaning, of course…when you're drinking beer and you want to celebrate with
your friends, you hit the glasses… you say “cheers”.
ok…
But this meaning is different than that “cheers”.
This meaning is just, “bye”.
Ok…
so, “cheers”.
That just means “bye”.
Especially in e-mails.
People write their e-mails…at the bottom, “cheers”.
Ok…
“Bye”.
The next one, “take care”.
“Take care” is a very sweet and friendly way to say “good-bye”.
You just say, “take care”.
ok…
A very nice way to say, “good-bye”.
I like it.
“Take care”.
And the last one, “good night”.
Ok…
“Good night”.
You can only use that at night.
Don't use it in the day.
Only at night.
And usually, late night.
ok…
So, maybe you're at work, very late, 10 p.m., everyone is going home, “good night”.
ok…
Again, it just means, “bye”.
Alright…
So, these are a few more expressions.
Of course, there's many many more expressions.
This is just a few.
Anyway, let's take a look at a few example dialogues to help you understand how to use
these.
Alright, the first example dialogue.
“Good-bye.” “ok, see you next time.”
Example dialogue two.
“Take care, Jack.”
“ok, you too, Jill.
Bye.”
Example dialogue three.
“See you later.”
“Cheers.”
And…example dialogue four.
“Have a good night.”
“ok, good night.”
I hope you understand the examples.
Before we go, I want to talk about these words.
Now, these words are not English.
ok…
These are other languages.
But all these words mean the same thing, “good-bye”.
ok…
So, in English, sometimes we borrow words from other languages and we use them to say
“good-bye”.
Alright…
Now, I'm going to say these words, but I'm going to say them with English pronunciation.
ok…
So it's probably not the right pronunciation, but it's how we say it in English.
The first word is Italian.
And we're going to pronounce that as “ciao”.
ok…
So, “ciao”.
So, sometimes we say, “ciao”.
And that just means, “bye”.
The next one, Japanese.
So, with English pronunciation, we say “sainara”.
Ok…
Again, “bye”.
This is Spanish.
“Adios”.
“Adios”.
“Adios”.
Again, “bye”.
And the last one is French.
“Au revoir.”
“Au revoir.
Just means “bye”.
ok…
So again, sometimes we say these in English to our friends.
Alright, so that's how we say “good-bye” in English.
I hope you understand.
That's it.
There's nothing left to say except, “good-bye”.
Hello everyone.
In this video, we're going to talk about expressions you use when you haven't
see someone for a long time.
ok…
So, imagine, you're walking on the street and then you see your friend and
you haven't seen your friend for a long time.
Maybe, you haven't seen your friend for a month…or 6 months…or a year…or 5 years..
or you haven't seen them for 10 years.
Ok…
You haven't seen them for a long time.
So what should you say?
Well, first, you should say “hi” or “hello”, but then…you should use one of these expressions.
Ok…
So the first one, “It's been a long time”.
“It's been a long time”.
So you can say, “Hey, Susan, how are you doing?
It's been a long time”.
Ok…
So you want to express that you haven't seen them for a long time.
The next one.
“It's been too long”.
“Hey, Jack, how's it going?
It's been too long”.
Ok…
We haven't seen each other for a long time.
“It's been too long”.
If you see, I have the blue line.
We change this to other time…time expressions.
You could say, “It's been too long”.
You could say, “It's been one year”.
“It's been one year”.
“It's been ten years”.
“It's been ages”.
“Hey, Stan, how are you doing?
It's been ages since we last saw each other.”
So, 'ages', a long time.
Ok…
And the last one here…
Of course this is the most common one and the easiest one to use.
“Long time, no see.”
So, “Hey, Jack.
How are you?
Long time, no see”.
Alright…
So, again, all of these mean, I haven't seen you in a long time.
Good to use…when you meet your friend you haven't seen in a long time.
Alright…let's move on to a few more expressions.
Ok…Here are two questions to use when you haven't seen someone in a long time.
The first one…
“How long has it been?”
Ok…
So, you haven't met your friend for a long time, so you say, “Hey, Dave.
How are you doing?
Haven't see you in a long time.”
And he says, “How long has it been?”
Ok…
So you have to think.
How long have we not seen each other?
So you can say, “It's been ….two months”.
Ok…
So, we haven't seen each other for two months.
So, “How long has it been since we last met?”
Ok…
“It's been…” and you have to think, “Uhmm, about 1 year.”
Ok…
The next question.
“What have you been up to?”
“What have you been up to?”
Now the “up to” is same as “What have you been doing?”
Ok…
“Since we last met, what have you been doing?” ok…
So, maybe you didn't meet your friend for 1 year.
ok…
So, you want to ask, you know, “how long has it been?
It's been 1 year.”
“What have you been up to?”
“What have you been doing for 1 year?”
Ok…
“Well, I've been traveling.”
“I've been working hard.”
“I've been studying English.”
Ok…
So you want to tell what have you been doing for that time.
Alright…
So these are two useful questions to use when you haven't met your friend for a long time.
Let's take a look at some example dialogues.
Ok, example dialogue one.
“Hi, Susan.
It's been a long time.”
“Hi, Dave.
Yes, it's been over 2 years.”
Example two.
“Hello, Mr. Smith.
How long has it been?”
“About 6 months.”
“I'm happy to see you again.”
“Yes, me too.”
Example dialogue three.
“Jessica, long time no see.
“Hi, Jeff.
What have you been up to?”
“Well, I got married and moved to France.”
“Wow, good for you.
I'm so happy to see you again.”
Example four.
“Hey, Paul.
It's been ages since we last met.”
“Yes, wow, maybe 10 years.”
“It's been too long.
I missed you.”
Ok, I hoped those dialogues helped you.
I know these expressions are a little bit difficult.. a little bit big…a little bit
complicated, but these are excellent expressions to use when you haven't seen someone for
a long time.
Ok…when you haven't seen your friend for a long time.
And, also, in the business situation… you haven't seen someone for a long time.
Alright…you should use these.
Well, I hope you can learn them and know them.
Maybe it takes a little more self-study.
Anyway, you can do it.
And I'll see you next time.
Hello, everyone.
In this video we're going to talk about your first meeting with a stranger.
Ok..
A stranger is someone you don't know.
So, here's a picture of two people.
They are strangers.
They don't know each other.
Ok…
So this is their first meeting.
And we have five things we should do in the first meeting.
Do or say.
Uhh…the first thing.
What's the first thing we should say at the first meeting?
Ok..
You meet someone…what's the first thing you say…?
Well, it should, of course, be “hi”.
Or “hello”.
“Hi” or “hello”.
And what's the second thing you should say?
“Nice to meet you”….no!
Ok…
Don't use “nice to meet you”, second.
Before “nice to meet you”, you should always ask about their name.
Ok…
You should ask them their name, first.
So, “Hi.
My name is Robin.
What's your name?”
Alright…
So, after the name, now you can say, “nice to meet you.”
“Nice to meet you.”
Alright…so, it's very important to have, “nice to meet you”, after the name.
Ok…
Meeting someone means you know them.
Ok…
You know their name.
So, if you put “nice to meet you”, before the name, it's very strange.
And many Koreans do this.
They say, “hi, nice to meet you.”
'We didn't meet, yet.'
Ok…
So you have to give the name.
“Hi, I'm Robin.
Nice to meet you.”
Alright…
What's the next thing?
So, this is the greeting.
Ok…
“Hi”, name, “nice to meet you.”
And the next thing…
This is gonna be questions.
So, you're going to start asking questions to get to know them.
For example, uhhh…
“Where do you live?”
“Where are you from?”
“What do you do?”
Ok…
You have to start asking questions to know them better.
And then once you talk… a little while…
The last step of course is “bye”.
“Good-bye.”
“See you later.”
Alright…
So you should follow these steps when you meet someone, a stranger, for the first time.
“Hello”, ask them their name, “nice to meet you”, ask some questions, and then,
“bye”.
Ok…that's the process of meeting a stranger for the first time.
Alright, let's take a look at an example dialogue.
Ok, let's look at this dialogue.
Two people are talking for the first time.
“Hi.”
“Hello.”
“My name's Robin.
What's your name?”
“My name's Jack.”
“Oh, nice to meet you.”
“Nice to meet you, too.”
“What do you do?”
“I'm a student.
And you?”
“I'm a teacher.”
“Well, I have to go.
See you again.”
“Yes, bye.”
Ok, I hope you understand what to say when you meet someone for the first time.
Alright…you should follow those five steps.
Say “hello”, ask about the name, then “nice to meet you.”
Remember, don't say “nice to meet you” so fast like, like many of my students.
It sounds very strange.
So after “nice to meet you”, then you can start asking some questions.
And, of course, the ending is always, “bye”.
Alright… that's it for this video.
“Bye.”
Hello, in this video we are going to talk about four essential questions you should
know when you first meet someone.
Ok…
Now, I call them essential questions, cause essential means very important…you must
know.
Ok…
Now, probably you already know most of them, but let's just review them anyways.
Let's take a look at the first one.
You think it's very easy, but maybe you're using it wrong.
The first question, “What is your name?”.
“What is your name?”
Now, probably when you were young, your English teacher taught you,
“What is your name?”.
…And that's fine, but you're not a child anymore, you're an adult.
Ok…
You've grown up.
So you shouldn't say, “What is your name?”
anymore.
Ok…
This sounds childish.
“What is your name?”
Ok…
An adult….we are going to use a contraction.
“What's”, ok…”What is…”, we're going to change it to “What's”.
“What's your name?”
Alright…
This is more common.
“What's your name?”
It's faster.
“What's your name?”
“What's your name?”
Ok, I wrote my name here.
“My name is Robin.”
Again, this is a little bit childish.
“What's your name?”
“My name is Robin.”
“My name is….”, again… you don't want to use this style anymore.
Let's make a contraction.
Make it faster.
“What's your name?”
“My name's Robin.”
“My name's…….my name's Robin.”
“What's your name?”
“My name's Robin.”
Alright…this is adult style.
Also, for “What's your name?”, you could just say, “I'm Robin.”
This is ok, too.
So, “My name's Robin.
I'm Robin.”…doesn't matter.
Both are ok.
Let's move on to the next question.
Ok, the next question.
Very common.
Very easy.
“Where are you from?”
“Where are you from?”
Ok…so say it very fast.
“Where are you from?”
“Where are you from?”
“Where are you from?”
“I from Korea.”
Oh, this is terrible.
So many of my students say, “I from Korea.”
Don't!
Don't say “I from Korea.”
Let's put a line through that.
Bad grammar.
“I from Korea.”…no the correct is, “I'm…..I'm from Korea.”
I have to hear this 'm' sound.
“I'm from Korea.”
Alright…
“Where are you from?”
“Where are you from?”
“I'm from Korea.”
Well, I'm not from Korea.
“I'm from Canada.”
Ok, so make sure you can say this question very fast.
“Where are you from?”
And make sure you use, 'I'm'
“I'm from Korea.”
Let's go to the next question.
“Where do you live?”
That's our next question.
“Where do you live?”
Don't say, “Where are you live?”
Ok, that is wrong.
The question is, “Where… do… you…
live?”
“Where do you live?”
“Where do you live?”
“Where do you live?”
Ok, so, “Where do you live?”, 'live' is asking where's your house…your home.
“Where do you live?”
So your answer should have your city or area.
So, “Where do you live?”
First answer here.
“I live Seoul.”
“I live Seoul.”
This is wrong!
Ok, bad grammar.
“Where do you live?”
“I live Seoul.”, No!
“Where do you live?”
“I live in…in Seoul.”
You need the preposition 'in'.
Always.
You always need 'in' Seoul.
“Where do you live?”
“I live in Seoul.”
Ok…
Uhhh, the last one here…is a short way.
“Where do you live?”
Ok, you don't have to say, “I live…”.
You could just start with, “in”.
The preposition 'in'.
So, “Where do you live?”
“In Seoul.”
Ok…
So, again.
“Where do you live?”
“I live in Seoul.”
“In Seoul.”
Never say this.
Alright…
Let's move on to the last question.
“What do you do?”
“What do you do?”
Ok, this is asking about 'job'.
“What do you do every day for work?”
Ok, “What do you do?”
Now English speakers don't say, “What…do …you …do?”
We say it very fast, we say, “What do you do?”
“What do you do?”
“What do you do?”
Ok, very difficult to hear.
“Whatdayou…this is whatdayou.
Whatdayou do?”
“Whatdayou do?”
Ok…
So, I ask to my students, “What do you do?”
And a lot of my students say, “I'm student.”
“I'm student.”
This is wrong!
Ok, this is bad grammar!
Don't use, “I'm student.”
“I'm student.”
“What do you do?”
“I'm student.”
Don't use that.
That's terrible grammar.
You should use this…and take a look.
“I'm 'a'”.
Ok…
Don't forget this…'a'
“I'm a…”
It sounds like one word.
“I'm a…”
“I'm a…”
“What do you do?”
“I'm a student.”
“I'm a student.”
“I'm a student.”
Ok…
“What do you do?”
“I'm a student.”
The next one.
“an…”
Remember, these words start with vowels.
Vowels, a, e, i, o , u.
And words that start with vowels, we should use 'an'.
Ok…
“So, what do you do?”
“I'm an engineer.”
“I'm an office worker.”
Ok…
Alright, so that's the last question.
“What do you do?”
So let's review the questions.
The first question.
“What's your name?”
“My name is Robin.”
Second question.
“Where are you from?”
“I'm from Canada.”
Third question.
“Where do you live?”
“I live in Anyang.”
And the last question.
“What do you do?”
“I'm a teacher.”
Alright…
So, I hope you understand how to say the questions…also how to answer the questions.
These are very important questions.
You should know them.
That's it.
See you next video.
Hello again.
In this video, we're going to look at some questions to ask someone to know about their
family.
Ok…
Now, remember, asking about family is a very personal thing.
So, make sure you are very familiar or friendly with the person before you start asking about
family.
Now, here are the first two questions and these are good questions to start with.
They are both 'Do you..?' questions.
The first one.
“Do you live alone?”
Ok, only one person in the house.
“Do you live alone?”
This is a really good question to ask someone.
“Do you live alone?”…because when they answer…if they answer, “yes”..ohh, then
you know they're single.
But, if they answer, “no”.
They will probably tell you, “No, I live with my parents.”
or “No, I live with my husband” or “wife”.
Ok…
So you could learn a lot by asking this question…about who he lives with or what kind of family he
has.
The second question.
“Do you live with your parents?”
Ok…
Similar style.
“Do you live with your parents?”, and the person will tell you, “yes” or “no”.
Now, both of these are 'Do you..?' questions.
And all 'Do you..?' questions…the easiest way to answer is…
“Yes, I do.”
“No, I don't.”
Ok…very easy answers.
“Do you live alone?”
“Yes, I do.”
“No, I don't.”
“Do you live with your parents?”
“Yes, I do.”
“No, I don't.”
Alright…so these are good quick answers, but these are boring answers.
Ok..
So, these answers are very easy, but probably if you say, “Yes, I do.” or “No, I don't.”,
you should also give more information.
“Do you live alone?”
“No, I don't.
I live with my parents.”
“Do you live with your parents?”
“Yes, I do.
We live in Chamsil.”
Ok..so, these are good ways to answer quickly, but you should try to give more information.
Alright, let's move on to the next questions.
Ok, so the next question is very common and very important.
This is the question you want to ask to know about their brothers and sisters.
And here is the question.
“Do you have any brothers or sisters?”
“Do you have any brothers or sisters?”
Ok…
Again, it's a “Do you…?” question.
So the simple answer is “Yes, I do.”, “No, I don't.”
But that's not enough information.
Ok, so here is the best answer.
“Do you have any brothers or sisters?”
So…”Yes, I have one brother”, “one sister”, “two bothers”, “two sisters”.
Ok…because it's two, remember we need that 's'.
“Two brothers.”
“Two sisters.”
“Do you have any brothers or sisters?”
“Yes, I have two sisters.”
Or, you could say, “I have one brother and two sisters”.
Or “I have one brother and three sisters”.
Ok…but remember the single and the plural.
Alright…
So, this is the best way to answer.
“Yes, I have one brother”.
Some people…uhhh…”no”, ok… you are single.
You have no brothers or sisters.
“Do you have any brothers or sisters?”
“No, I'm an only child.”
“No, I'm an only child.”
“I'm an only child.”
Ok…
So this is what you would say, in English, to say that you have no brothers or sisters.
Ok…
Let's move on to the next questions.
“Are you single?”
“Are you married?”
These our next two questions.
Very important questions to ask someone.
Alright…
So, it's very important to know if they're single or married.
So, again, “Are you single?”
Is that person alone?…only one?
“Are you married?”
“Do you have a husband?” or “wife?”.
Ok…
Now, they are “Are you…?” questions, so all “Are you…?” questions, we have
to answer, “Yes, I am.”, “No, I'm not.”
Ok…
Some people say, “Yes, I'm.”
This is wrong.
You can't use a contraction here.
It has to be “I am.”
Never say, “Yes, I'm”.
That is wrong.
It is only, “Yes, I am.”
“Yes, I am.”
“No, I'm not.”
Ok, so let's practice.. fast…speaking fast.
“Are you single?”
“Yes, I am.”
“Are you married?”
“No, I'm not.”
“Are you single?”
“No, I'm not.”
“Are you married?”
“Yes, I am.”
Ok…
So those are these two questions.
Let's move on to the last question.
Ok, we're at the last question.
“Do you have any children?”
“Do you have any children?”
Now, probably, the first question is, “Are you married?”
“Yes, I am.”
Then you would ask, “Do you have any children?”
“Do you have any children?”
Now this is similar style to, “Do you have any brothers or sisters?”
“Do you have any brothers or sisters?”
“Do you have any children?”
Same style answer.
“Yes, I have one son.”
“Yes, I have one daughter.”
“Yes, I have two sons.”
“Yes, I have two daughters.”
So, remember, “one son”, “two sons”.
Don't forget the 's'.
“Two sons.”
“Two daughters.”
Of course, you could also say, “Yes, I have one daughter and one son.”
Or…”I have three daughters and two sons.”
Ok…you can say many things.
uhhh, some people have no children.
So, “Do you have any children?”
“No, I don't have any, yet.”
Ok, “I don't have any, yet.”
“Do you have any children?”
“No, I don't have any, yet.”
Alright…
So this is the question you want to ask about children.
Alright, so we learned a lot of questions to ask people about their family.
Remember, these are kind of personal questions, so make sure it's ok…make sure you're
friendly first.
Alright, so, you should practice these questions.
These questions are common and very useful.
That's it.
See you next video.
Hello everyone.
In this video, we are going to talk about personal question.
Ok…
Now, you have to be very careful asking someone personal questions.
Ok, if you ask them too soon…ok…maybe you don't know each other very well, yet,
and you ask the questions too soon, they might be a little bit upset or angry.
You got to be careful asking these questions.
Make sure you're friendly.
Now, the first one I'm going to start with…
“How old are you?”
Ok…
As we know in Korea…it's very important to know about age.
So, when you meet someone for the first time, uhhh, you want to know their age…how old
they are.
But, again, this is kind of a personal question, so it shouldn't be one of the first questions.
Ok…
You should talk a little bit with the person and then when you feel the time is right,
or it's ok, then ask this question.
Ok…
Don't ask this question too soon.
Anyway, let's take a look at the question.
“How old are you?”
“How old are you?”
“How old are you?”
And…some of my students say, “my old is twenty-two.”
“My old is twenty-two.”
Of course, this is bad grammar.
You cannot say, “my old is twenty-two.”
That's wrong.
“I'm twenty-two years old.”
Ok, this is a full sentence.
“How old are you?”
“I'm twenty-two years old.”
Uhhh, probably your teacher taught you this way.
But, this is kind of childish.
“How old are you?”
“I'm twenty-two years old.”
Ok..
As an adult, uhhh, we're probably going to say it a little bit quicker.
We're going to say this:
“How old are you?”
“I'm twenty-two.”
Ok…
So, this is…the best way.
The easiest way… and the most common way.
Ok…
“How old are you?”
“I'm twenty-two.”
Use this.
This is ok, but this is better.
And certainly, never use this.
Alright, let's move on to the next question.
ok, that's our next question.
Very personal, private question.
Again, don't say it too soon.
“Do you have a boyfriend?”
“Do you have a girlfriend?”
Ok…
Depends who you're talking to.
“Do you have a boyfriend?”
“Do you have a girlfriend?”
Ok, you want to know.
This is a “Do you…?” question.
“Do you…?”
So the answer's very easy.
“Yes, I do.”
“No, I don't.”
“Do you have a boyfriend?”
“Yes, I do.”
“Do you have a girlfriend?”
“Yes, I do.”
“Do you have a boyfriend?”
“No, I don't.”
“Do you have a girlfriend?”
“No, I don't.”
Alright…
Be sure to use 'a'.
Don't say, “Do you have boyfriend?”
Ok, this is very important.
“Do you have a boyfriend?”
Alright…
“Do you have a girlfriend?”
“Do you have boyfriend?”
“Do you have a girlfriend?”
Alright, again…little bit personal question.
Don't ask it too soon.
Let's move on to the next question.
The next question is a fun question to ask someone.
“What's your blood type?”
“What's your blood…?”, this is pronounced, “blood”.
That's your 비…blood.
“What's your blood type?”
Ok…
Very easy to answer.
“What's your blood type?”
“It's 'A'.”
“It's 'B'.”
“It's 'AB'.”
“It's 'O'.”
“What's your blood type?”
Alright…
What do you think my blood type is?
Well, my blood type is…not 'B'…not 'A'…not 'O'.
“It's 'AB'.”
Yes, that's my blood type.
So, I understand 'AB' means genius or psycho…uhhh…hmmm…which one am I?
Well, anyway, it's a fun question to ask someone, but make sure you know that person
well.
Last move on to the last question.
Here's the last question I want to talk about in this video.
Well, first, look at this question.
“What's your hobby?”
Ok, that's an ok question, “What's your hobby?” ,but in my opinion, this question
is stupid.
Ok, so, I'm going to say that's a stupid question to ask.
Don't ask that question.
“What's your hobby?”
Instead, this is a better question.
Ok…and this is more common.
“What do you do in your free time?”
“What do you do in your free time?”
Ok, so that's better than asking, “What's your hobby?”
That's kind of old style.
This is more common.
Better.
“What do you do…?
What do you do…in your free time?”
Alright…
Very easy to answer.
“I like to…”, and then you would put a verb.
Ok…
“I like to play computer games.”
“I like to shop.”
“I like to exercise.”
“I like to go meet my friends.”
“I like to chat on the internet.”
“I like to drink soju.”
ok…very easy to answer.
“What do you do in your free time?”
“Hey, what do you do in your free time?”
“I like to study English.”
Alright…
So, we learned a few personal questions in this video.
They're good questions to ask…to get to know someone and some of them are very fun.
But, again, they're personal questions, so, ahhh, be careful when asking the questions
because the person maybe doesn't want to answer these questions.
Alright, so that's it.
See you next video.
Hello, students.
In this video, we're going to talk about “Do you…?” and “Are you…?” questions.
Now, “Do you…?” and “Are you…?” questions are very useful.
You should know them…because once you know how to ask questions with “Do you…?”
and “Are you…?”, you can ask many many questions very quickly.
Let's look at “Do you…?” questions first.
And I have two styles here.
The first style, “Do you like…?”
Ok, very simple.
“Do you like…?”
So you would put anything here.
“Do you like Korea?”
“Do you like kimchi?”
“Do you like soju?”
“Do you like ice-cream?”
“Do you like handsome guys?”
“Do you like sexy girls?”
Ok, you can ask so many questions with “Do you like…?”
The next style.
“Do you like to…?”
Ok…
No, they're the same, but we're adding 'to'.
“Do you like to…?”
Ok, this is…means we're going to have some sort of verb.
Some sort of action word.
So for example, “Do you like to ski?”
“Do you like to exercise?”
“Do you like to play computer games?”
“Do you like to drink?”
Ok, they're many things you could put here.
uhhh, action, something…they're doing something.
“Do you like to swim?”
“Do you like to ride a bicycle?”
Alright, that's “Do you like…?”, “Do you like to…?”
Very useful for asking question very quickly.
Alright, now if someone asks you these questions.
The “Do you…?” questions.
With “Do you…?” questions…very easy answer.
Ok, “Do you like pizza?”
Look down here.
You could say, “Yes, I do.” or “No, I don't.”
“Do you like pizza?”
“Yes, I do.”
“No, I don't.”
Alright…
Very easy to answer.
Ok, so very easy to ask, very easy to answer.
You should know how to ask “Do you…?” questions.
Let's move on to the “Are you…?” questions.
Ok, here are the “Are you…?” questions.
The “Are you…?” questions are very easy to use and very useful, also.
Ok, let's take a look.
So, “Are you hungry?”
“Are you hungry?”
“Are you tired?”
Ok, these two are asking about the condition of the person.
“Are you hungry?”
“Are you tired?”
“Are you having fun?”
Ok, you want to know how they are feeling.. their condition.
Their body condition.
The next two.
“Are you happy?”
“Are you angry?”
Alright, you're asking about their emotion…their feeling.
“Are you happy?”
“Are you angry?”
“Are you scared?”
Alright, you want to know their emotional feeling.
So, the “Are you…?” question is very good to know how the person's condition..
and how they are feeling.
Alright, if someone asks you…”Are you…?” question.
This is how you answer.
So, “Are you hungry?”
“Yes, I am.”
“Are you tired?”
“No, I'm not.”
Ok, don't confuse the “Do you…?” and “Are you…?” questions.
Ok, sometimes, uhhh, my students confuse them.
The “Do you…?” questions, “Yes, I do.”, “No, I don't.”
The “Are you…?” questions, “Yes, I am.”, “No, I'm not.”
Ok, you got to be very careful.
Don't confuse them.
So, that's the “Are you…?” questions.
Uhhh, so the “Do you…?” and “Are you…?” questions…very useful to know them right
away because you can ask a lot of questions, in English, to a native speaker…so many
questions…ok…
So learn them and practice them.
That's it for this video.
Hello everyone.
In this video, I'm going to talk about how to introduce your friends.
So you have to introduce one friend to another friend.
And it's very easy.
Let's take a look.
Here is me, Robin.
And I have two friends.
Mike's a good friend and Sally is also my friend.
They are my friends.
But, Mike and Sally…they don't know each other.
Ok, they are strangers.
So, I have to introduce them.
So, I would probably say, “Mike, let me introduce my friend.
Mike this is Sally.
Sally this is Mike.”
Ok…
One more time.
“Mike this is Sally.
Sally this is Mike.”
Ok…
I introduced them.
So, once I introduce them, probably they're doing to start talking to each other.
They'll probably say, “Nice to meet you.”, “Nice to meet you, too.”
And maybe ask some questions.
Ok…
That's it for introducing a friend.
Let's take a look at a dialogue, so we understand it better.
Alright, the first dialogue.
“Hello, June.
Let me introduce my friend.
Steve, this is June.
June, this is Steve.”
“Nice to meet you.”
“Nice to meet you, too.”
The second dialogue.
“Hey, Jack.”
“Hi, Robin.
Who's this?”
“Oh, let me introduce my friend.
Jack, this is Jessica.
Jessica, this is Jack.”
“Nice to meet you.”
“Nice to meet you, too.”
I hope you understand the dialogue.
Uhhh, it's very easy to introduce your friend.
And I hope one day, I can introduce you to my friends and you can introduce me to your
friends.
Ok…
Anyway, that's it for this video.
See you next video.
Hello everyone.
My name is Robin and welcome to the first video in the numbers series.
Alright…
Now, what we're going to talk about English numbers, today.
And if you already know about English numbers, that's ok because this video is an excellent
review.
Ahhh, if you don't know about English numbers, it's time to learn.
Alright…
So, let's take a look.
The first one here.
“Zero.”
And if you notice next to zero, it has another name, “oh.”
Now, a lot of native speakers say, “zero”, but more native speakers will just say, “oh”.
Ok…
So this is very confusing to Korean students…because when I say, “zero”, X
When I say it as “oh”, many of my students hear “오”, and they don't think of
this number…they think of this number…five.
Because in Korean, “오” means five.
Ok…
So you got to be very careful.
In English, “oh” means zero.
Ok…
Let's move on to the next numbers.
They're a little bit easier.
Ahhh, listen to my pronunciation of each number.
ok, so the first one.
“One.”
“Two.”
“Three.”
“Four.”
“Five.”
“Six.”
“Seven.”
“Eight.”
“Nine.”
and “Ten.”
Ok, so one more time.
“One.”
“Two.”
“Three.”
“Four.”
“Five.”
“Six.”
“Seven.”
“Eight.”
“Nine.”
“Ten.”
Alright, and don't forget “zero”, and “oh”.
Ok…
Let's move on to the next set of numbers.
Ok, let's continue on with our numbers.
I have the next set here.
Eleven until twenty.
Alright…
So, “eleven”
“Twelve.”
“Thirteen.”
“Fourteen.”
“Fifteen.”
“Sixteen.”
“Seventeen.”
“Eighteen.”
“Nineteen.”
and “Twenty.”
Now, as you can see, I put the red line here on these ones cause these are the 'teens'.
ok…
“Thirteen.”
“Fourteen.”
“Fifteen.”
“Sixteen.”
“Seventeen.”
“Eighteen.”
“Nineteen.”
Alright…
So you got to be very careful with the teens because look at this.
“Twenty.”
“Teen” and “..ty”, sound very similar.
So, it can be confusing.
So this has to be, “teen.”.. and “..ty.”
So, “Nineteen” and “Twenty.”
Ok, there's one more problem I want to talk about.
That is “twelve” and “twenty.”
A lot of my students confuse the numbers twelve and twenty.
Be very careful.
This is “twelve.”
“Twelve.”
And this is “twenty.”
Don't confuse those numbers, please.
Alright, let's go through the pronunciation one more time.
“Eleven”
“Twelve.”
“Thirteen.”
“Fourteen.”
“Fifteen.”
“Sixteen.”
“Seventeen.”
“Eighteen.”
“Nineteen.”
and “Twenty.”
Ok, let's move on to some bigger numbers.
Ok, let's continue with the numbers from twenty to one hundred.
We've already studied twenty.
Well, what comes after twenty?
“Twenty-one.”
And we can see how I spell it, twenty, and we have to put this.
This is a hyphen.
One.
“Twenty-one.”
And after “Twenty-one.”…
“Twenty-two.”
Again, with the hyphen.
And after “Twenty-two.”…
“Twenty-three.”
“Twenty-four.”
“Twenty-five.”
“Twenty-six.”
“Twenty-seven.”
“Twenty-eight.”
“Twenty-nine.”
“Thirty.”
And then it continues again…
“Thirty-one.”
“Thirty-two.”
“Thirty-three.”
All the way to “forty.”
And then, “forty-one.”
“Forty-two.”
It continues this until “one hundred.”
Ok…
So, let's just focus on the tens right now.
Now the first two, we already know.
We know “ten” and “twenty”.
Now, let's take a look at these.
So, of course…
“Thirty.”
“Forty.”
“Fifty.”
“Sixty.”
“Seventy.”
“Eighty.”
“Ninety.”
“One hundred.”
Ok, this is “One hundred”, but it could also be pronounced, “a hundred.”
Ok…
Both are ok.
Ahhh, I want to talk about “forty” again.
Now the spelling of 'forty'… a lot of my students see the 'four', so when they
spell 'forty', the spell it f-o-u-r-t-y.
This is wrong.
Ok, you have to spell it f-o-r-t-y.
That's 'forty'.
Alright…
So, that's the numbers from 'twenty' to 'one hundred'.
Let's do some extra pronunciation practice right now.
Alright, I know you need extra practice with these numbers.
Ok…
These numbers are difficult and confusing because they sound very similar.
And a lot of my students have problems pronouncing these numbers correctly.
…and it makes me confused, sometimes.
Alright…
And I have one story.
Ahhh, a few years ago, I made an appointment, or actually a date with a girl.
And we were supposed to meet at five-fifty.
That's what she told me, “Let's meet at five-fifty.”
So, I went to the meeting place at five-fifty, but she wasn't there.
Ok…
So I waited and waited, she never came.
And then the next time I saw here, I said to her, “You know, why didn't you show
up?
I was waiting at five-fifty.”
And she said, “Yeah, I was waiting there, too, but you never came.”
And I was very confused.
Well, it turns out that she said, “Five-fifteen.”, but it sounded, to me, like, “five-fifty.”
Ok…
So we were both confused of the time.
While she was there at five-fifteen, I was there at five-fifty and we never met.
Ok…
So, it's very important to get the numbers right…and don't confuse them.
So, let's review.
Of course, these are the 'teens'.
So, this is “Thirteen.”
And this is “Thirty.”
“Thirteen.”
“Thirty.”
“Fourteen.”
“Forty.”
“Fifteen.”
“Fifty.”
“Sixteen.”
“Sixty.”
“Seventeen.”
“Seventy.”
“Eighteen.”
“Eighty.”
“Nineteen.”
“Ninety.”
Ok…
Make sure you get those right and pronounce them correctly, so you don't have confusion,
like me.
Alright, ahhh…before we go, we're going to do….. a listening test with numbers.
So you should get a pen and some paper…and listen carefully.
I'm going to say the number.
You should write down the number.
Good luck.
Alright, so for this test, you should have some paper or something just to write down…what
you hear.
So, I'm going to say a number and you should think of that number or write that number
down.
Alright, let's start.
Number one.
The first number is “seven.”
“Seven.”
Ok, that's easy.
You should have this.
Number two.
“Thirteen.”
“Thirteen.”
Ok, so it's thirteen.
Number three.
“Seventy-five.”
“Seventy-five.”
Ok, so that's a big number: seventy-five.
Number four.
“Twenty.”
“Twenty.”
Ok, you should write this: twenty.
And number five.
“Nineteen.”
“Nineteen.”
Ok, looks like this.
And number six.
“Sixty-six.”
“Sixty-six.”
Ok, so this is sixty-six.
Number seven.
“Thirty-three.”
“Thirty-three.”
Ok, you should write: thirty-three.
Number eight.
“Ninety.”
“Ninety.”
Ok, so this is ninety.
Number nine.
“Twelve.”
“Twelve.”
Ok, you should write: twelve.
And the last one.
Listen carefully.
“Twenty-One.”
“Twenty-One.”
Alright, so you should write: twenty-one.
I hope you did well on the listening test.
Ok…
So these are the basic numbers from one to one hundred.
You have to know how to say these numbers…you should know how to write these numbers.
And I hope this video helps you, but, of course, this video is not enough.
You have to do self-study and practice these numbers a lot to make sure you know them well.
Alright…
Well anyway, that's it for this video.
See you next time.
Ok, hello everyone.
We already practiced the numbers one to one hundred.
Alright…
Those are the basic numbers.
We're getting into some more difficult numbers.
Bigger numbers.
Ahhh, don't be scared.
I will try to explain it as simple as possible.
Please listen carefully and good luck.
Here we go.
So, I wrote the numbers here.
And…let's start with the first three.
We already know the first three.
“One.”
“Ten.”
“One hundred.”
Ok…
So, that's the easy part.
Now, it's going to get a little more confusing.
So I will try to make it simple.
Let's look at the next number here.
Ahhh, this is “one thousand.”
Ok…
So we have three zeros.
Three zeros.
That is “a thousand.”
And…every three zeros, we usually use a comma.
So one, comma, three numbers.
Three zeros.
“One thousand.”
So three zeros is a thousand.
Let's move on to the next number.
We have the three zeros again.
'Thousand', we know that's “a thousand.”
What's this number?
“Ten.”
“Ten thousand.”
“One thousand.”
“Ten thousand.”
Let's move to the next…
Ok, we know this is 'thousand'.
“One hundred thousand.”
Ok…
So, “One thousand.”
“Ten thousand.”
“One hundred thousand.”
Let's move on to a really big number.
Now, the three zeros here…I underlined with blue.
Cause that's a 'thousand'.
But if you look here, these are red.
Cause, they're not a 'thousand' anymore.
We have three zeros and three zeros.
This is now, “a million.”
So if you see six zeros, that's “a million.”
So, we have “one million.”
Ok…
Let's move down.
“Ten million.”
Alright…
So, don't be confused.
Let's go through this again.
“One.”
“Ten.”
“One hundred.”
“One thousand.”
“Ten thousand.”
“One hundred thousand.”
“One million.”
and “Ten million.”
Ok…
I know it's difficult.
It take a lot of practice.
So let's go do some practice right now.
Ok, so I have seven numbers here for us to practice how to say them.
So, let's take a look.
The first one.
Very easy.
We have two zeros here.
This is simply, “Five hundred.”
Ok…
Let's move to number two.
Now, number two, we can see, we have the three zeros here.
And I told you, that means thousand.
So this is “seven thousand.”
Ok…
Number three.
Again, we have three zeros here.
“Fifteen thousand.”
“Seven thousand.”
“Fifteen thousand.”
Let's look at the next one.
Three zeros.
We know this is 'thousand'.
This is “Twenty-five thousand.”
Alright…
Let's go to a bigger number.
Lots of zeros here.
Ok, so we know this is 'a thousand'.
And we have more zeros here.
But it's not three zeros.
So, this is just a thousand and this is two hundred.
Ok…
“Two hundred thousand.”
Let's go to a bigger number.
Now we have…three zeros…three zeros.
So, this is no longer 'thousand'.
This is now, 'million'.
“Seven million.”
Ok…
Let's go to a bigger number.
Three zeros.
Three zeros.
“Eighteen million.”
Ok, so one more time.
“Five hundred.”
“Seven thousand.”
“Fifteen thousand.”
“Twenty-five thousand.”
“Two hundred thousand.”
“Seven million.”
“Eighteen million.”
Do you understand?
I hope so.
Ahhh, let's try a test right now.
Alright, so for the test, you should have maybe a pen and a paper.
That will help you.
There's ten questions.
Ok…
So, I'm going to say a number.
You have to think of that number and write down that number.
So, number one.
“Fifteen thousand.”
“Fifteen thousand.”
Ok, so you should have written fifteen thousand.
Alright, number two.
“Eight hundred.”
“Eight hundred.”
Ok, so you should write eight hundred.
Number three.
“Seventy-five thousand.”
“Seventy-five thousand.”
Ok…
So it looks like this: seventy-five thousand.
Number four.
“Six million.”
“Six million.”
Ok, so you should write it like this.
With six zeros.
And number five.
“Six hundred thousand.”
“Six hundred thousand.”
Ok, so six hundred thousand looks like this.
Number six.
“Three thousand.”
“Three thousand.”
Ok, so this is three thousand.
Number seven.
“Nineteen thousand.”
“Nineteen thousand.”
Ok, so this is nineteen thousand.
Number eight.
“Sixty-six thousand.”
“Sixty-six thousand.”
Ok, it looks like this.
Number nine.
“Five hundred thousand.”
“Five hundred thousand.”
Ok, it looks like this.
And the last one.
Number ten.
“Twenty-five million.”
“Twenty-five million.”
Alright, that's a big number.
It looks like this.
Wwoooo, I know that was a difficult test.
I hope you did well.
Uhh, I know big numbers are very difficult to say and understand.
It take a lot of practice.
Now I hope this video helps you.
But again, you need a lot of self-study to truly master these numbers.
Alright…
See you next video.
This video is very very difficult.
This is 'advanced numbers'.
Ok…
It's very difficult to understand.
It's very difficult to express these numbers.
We're going to talk about very big numbers and how to say them.
Alright…
Uhhh, try not to be scared.
I will try to teach you as simple as possible.
Again, this video is meant to help you.
You have to do a lot of self-study to truly master these numbers.
Ok, let's start with the 'hundreds' here.
Now we already know this number.
You should be able to say this number by now.
“One hundred.”
But let's look at the next…
Ok…
Now this is “one hundred and one.”
Now listen to what I said.
“One hundred and one.”
Do you hear the 'and'?
Ok…
Now, that's actually British style.
When British people say numbers, they use an 'and'.
So, “One hundred and one.”
But American style is different.
They don't say “and”.
Ok, so, “One hundred and one.”
American style is “One hundred one.”
No 'and'.
Ok…
So British style again: “One hundred and one.”
American style: “One hundred one.”
Now, which style should you use?
Doesn't matter.
Both are ok.
Everyone will understand you if you use British style or American style.
British style doesn't sound strange.
American style doesn't sound strange.
I come from Canada, so sometimes I use British style, sometimes I use American style.
So, keep that in mind.
Probably when you're listening to me, sometimes I use the 'and', sometimes I don't.
Ok…
So, “One hundred and one” or “one hundred one.”
Let's look at the next number.
Ok…
“One hundred fifty” or “one hundred and fifty.”
Ok…
So, we know this is fifty…”one hundred fifty.”
Let's look at the next number.
That's one.
That's fifty-one.
“One hundred fifty-one” or “one hundred and fifty-one.”
Alright…
Let's look at the next number.
We know this is two.
We know this is ninety-two.
This is “seven hundred ninety-two” or “seven hundred and ninety-two.”
Alright…
And the last number here.
Well, we know that's nine.
That's ninety-nine.
That's “nine hundred ninety-nine” or “nine hundred and ninety-nine.”
Alright…
So these are the 'hundreds'.
Let's move to bigger numbers.
The 'thousands'.
Are you read for some bigger number?
I'm sorry, but it's going to start to get real difficult.
Ok…
So, let's take a look here.
Listen carefully.
Our next number…we know this is 'a' thousand'.
So this is “one thousand one.”
Ok, “one thousand one.”
If you want to use British style, “one thousand and one.”
Ok, again, doesn't matter.
So, ”one thousand one.”
Let's move up.
So we know this is 'one hundred'.
And we know this is “one thousand one hundred.”
“One thousand one hundred.”
Ok…
Now, let's move to the the third number here.
A little more confusing.
We got lost of numbers.
Ok, don't be so scared.
We know that's 'four'.
We know that's 'twenty-four'.
We know that's 'three hundred and twenty-four'.
And then we got the 'thousands'.
So, “seven thousand three hundred twenty-four.”
“Seven thousand three hundred twenty-four.”
Let's move on to the next number.
'Five', 'fifty-five', 'five hundred fifty-five', “ten thousand five hundred
fifty-five.”
Ok…
Let's move on.
'Four', 'twenty-four', 'three hundred and twenty-four', “seventeen thousand
three hundred and twenty-four.”
Let's move on.
Bigger number here.
'Six', 'sixty-six', 'six hundred and sixty-six', “one hundred and fifty-two
thousand six hundred and sixty-six.”
Ok, let's review these numbers again.
“One thousand one.”
“One thousand one hundred.”
“Seven thousand three hundred twenty-four.”
“Ten thousand five hundred fifty-five.”
“Seventeen thousand three hundred and twenty-four.”
“One hundred and fifty-two thousand six hundred and sixty-six.”
Ok…
You ready for some more.
Let's go to some even bigger numbers.
You're still watching this video?
Ahhh, that's too bad because I have something very scary to show you.
Chuuuuuu….
Alright, so here are some very very big numbers.
And let's try to say them.
Uhhh, the first one.
Alright, we have three and three.
So, we know this is 'million'.
So this is going to be “six million eight.”
Ok, very simple.
That's an eight.
“Six million eight.”
Let's move on to the next one.
Alright, so if we take….we also know this is 'million'.
But if we just start here.
How much is that?
Well, that's 'five hundred thousand'.
So how much is that?
Well that's “five million five hundred thousand”.
Alright…
Let's get to a… very big and confusing number.
Even confusing to me.
But let's try it together.
Ahhh, again we have three and three.
We know this is 'million'.
We know this is 'thirteen million'.
Ahhh, but, we have to say all of these numbers.
Ok, so let's start slow.
That's 'two', 'thirty-two', 'four hundred thirty-two'.
Well that's a zero, but that's…oh, we're going into a ..oh…it's getting very confusing
now.
This would be 'twenty thousand four hundred thirty-two'.
'Six hundred and twenty thousand four hundred and thirty-two'.
“Thirteen million six hundred and twenty thousand four hundred and thirty-two.”
“Thirteen million six hundred and twenty thousand four hundred and thirty-two.”
Whew, big number.
Let's move on.
I'm scared myself.
Alright, again, we have three and three.
I know this is 'million'.
I know this is a 'twenty-four million'.
What are all these numbers?
'Two'.
'Thirty-two'.
'Four hundred and thirty-two'.
'Eight thousand four hundred and thirty-two'.
'Forty-eight thousand four hundred and thirty-two'.
'Five hundred and forty-eight thousand four hundred and thirty-two'.
And our final number, “twenty-four million five hundred and forty-eight thousand four
hundred and thirty-two.”
“Twenty-four million five hundred and forty-eight thousand four hundred and thirty-two.”
The last one here.
A really really big number.
Ok…
So, again, 'seven'.
'Forty-seven'.
'Nine hundred and forty-seven'.
'Two thousand nine hundred forty-seven'.
'Four hundred and thirty-two thousand nine hundred and forty-seven'.
And… what's this?
Again, this is three, three.
This is a 'million'.
So this is, “One hundred and twenty-five million four hundred and thirty-two thousand
nine hundred and forty-seven.”
“One hundred and twenty-five million four hundred and thirty-two thousand nine hundred
and forty-seven.”
Ok, do you understand all these numbers?
If you do, that's great.
Ahhh, but before we do a test, we're going to do a little extra practice.
Ok, so let's just review a little bit.
I have five numbers here, just for a quick review….before the test.
Ok…
So, the first one.
How much is this?
Well, 'four', 'forty-four', “four hundred forty-four.”
And again, we can use the 'and'.
“Four hundred 'and' forty-four.”
That's possible.
Uhhh, the next number.
Ok, we know three zeros…or three numbers here.
This is 'thousand'.
So, “eight thousand nine hundred forty-two.”
The next number.
Ok.. lots of numbers…ahhh….
We know it's 'thousand'.
“Fifty-five thousand five hundred forty-three.”
Bigger number.
Lots of sevens.
But don't be scared of all these sevens.
So, again it's just 'thousand'.
So, “two hundred and seventy-seven thousand seven hundred seventy-seven.”
“Two hundred and seventy-seven thousand seven hundred seventy-seven.”
Alright, and let's go to the 'millions'.
Three, three.
I know this is a 'million'.
Cause it has two commas.
So, “three million three hundred and twenty thousand three hundred and twenty-one.
Alright…
So, if you can understand how to say these five, you're ready for the test.
So, we're going to start the test.
You should prepare some paper and a pen.
Ahhh, I'm going to say the numbers and you should write down the numbers.
Alright…
So let's start the test.
Good luck.
Number one.
“Six hundred sixty-six.”
“Six hundred sixty-six.”
Alright, so you should write this.
“Six hundred sixty-six.”
Number two.
“Three thousand two hundred twelve.”
“Three thousand two hundred twelve.”
Ok, so you should write this.
The next number.
Number three.
“Six thousand four hundred thirty-two.”
“Six thousand four hundred thirty-two.”
Alright, so you should write this.
Number four.
Getting bigger.
“Twelve thousand eight hundred fourteen.”
“Twelve thousand eight hundred fourteen.”
Alright, so it looks like this.
Number five.
“Twenty-two thousand four hundred thirty-two.”
“Twenty-two thousand four hundred thirty-two.”
Ok, looks like this.
Number six.
“Seventy-nine thousand five hundred twenty-one.”
“Seventy-nine thousand five hundred twenty-one.”
Alright, looks like this.
Number seven.
“Four hundred and thirty-two thousand nine hundred eighty-seven.”
“Four hundred thirty-two thousand nine hundred eighty-seven.”
Ok, looks like this.
Number eight.
“Two million three hundred and forty-three thousand nine hundred eighty-two.”
“Two million three hundred and forty-three thousand nine hundred eighty-two.”
Oh…very big number.
Ok, it looks like this.
Number nine.
“Fifty-four million five hundred and forty-three thousand nine hundred eighty-seven.”
“Fifty-four million five hundred and forty-three thousand nine hundred eighty-seven.”
Ok, so that looks like this.
Number ten.
The last one.
Ok, the last one's very difficult.
Sorry.
Ok…
Listen carefully.
“Eleven million one hundred eleven thousand one hundred eleven.”
“Eleven million one hundred eleven thousand one hundred eleven.”
Ok, so that looks like this.
Uhhh, this is a very difficult video.
Uhhh.
Well, that's English numbers.
Those are the advanced numbers.
Uhhh, I hope you did well on the test.
I know it was a very difficult test and it takes a long long to master the numbers you
saw today.
Alright…
Takes a lot of self-study.
A lot of practice.
But never give up…ahhh, you can do it.
I believe in you.
Well, that's it for this video.
See you next time.
Hello, everyone.
This is an advanced numbers video.
I'm going to teach how to express some advanced numbers.
Let's take a look.
Alright, we know this is expressed, “nine hundred”.
And let's go to the next one.
Now, I taught you before this is expressed “one thousand”.
Ok…
Now, “one thousand” is the best way to express it.
But, it is possible to express it “ten hundred”.
Ok…
Next one.
“One thousand one hundred.”
That's the best way.
But, some people will say “eleven hundred”.
“Twelve hundred.”
“Thirteen hundred.”
“Fourteen hundred.”
“Twenty hundred.”
“Twenty-one hundred.”
“Ninety-nine hundred.”
Ok, this is only “ten thousand one hundred.”
Ok…
This can be “ninety-nine hundred”, but when you're getting into bigger…bigger
numbers, you have to stop saying “hundred” and change to 'thousands'.
Ok…
So you can say “hundred” between these numbers.
Alright, so from “one hundred, two hundred, three hundred, four hundred, five hundred,”
all the way up to “ten hundred, twenty hundred,” ahhh up…until “ninety-nine hundred ninety-nine”.
So you can see this number is already past that number.
So the hundreds stop.
Alright, this is a little bit confusing, I know.
Let's do a little bit of practice.
Ok, so I wrote a few more example to help you understand how to express these numbers
using 'hundred'.
Alright…
So again, this is our range.
We can only say “hundred” with these numbers.
So the first one.
The best way is “one thousand seven hundred”, but you can express it “seventeen hundred”.
Next one.
“One thousand seven hundred one.”
Or…
“Seventeen hundred one.”
“Seventy-five hundred.”
“Seventy-five hundred twenty-one.”
“Ninety-two hundred twelve.” and the last one.
Ok, the last one is outside.
Ok…
It's continuing.
It's too big.
We have to use 'thousand', so this has to be “eleven thousand one hundred.”
Ok…
You can't say, “a hundred and eleven hundred.”
Ok, it has to be “eleven thousand one hundred.”
Alright, I hope this helps you understand a little better how to express in 'hundreds'.
But, as your teacher, I prefer if you say “one thousand seven hundred”.
To use it that way.
But I have to teach you the other way because somebody might say to you “seventeen hundred”,
so you should be able to understand.
Alright…
So that's it.
See you next video.
Hello, everyone.
In this video, we are going to talk about ordinal numbers.
Now, ordinal numbers are different than cardinal numbers.
Of course cardinal numbers are numbers like one two three four five.
Ordinal numbers are different.
Ordinal numbers are used for expressing things like rank.
First, second, third place…
uhhh… in a contest.
Or they're used to express anniversaries.
For example, “This is my third wedding anniversary.”
And it's also used commonly in the calendar for dates.
For example, “June first,” ahhh, “June second.”
Ok…
So this where we use ordinal numbers.
So, in this video, I'm going to teach you how to write ordinal numbers and also pronounce
them correctly.
Ok…
So, we're going to look at the first ten.
I have the first ten here.
So let's go through them very quickly.
This is “first”…and if you notice the last two letters…I underline in blue.
Ok…
The last two letters are very important.
So, if you see first, the last two letters are 's-t'.
So when we want to write an ordinal number, we have number one, we must use the last two
letters.
The last two letters are 's-t'.
So this is our ordinal number.
We should write 's-t'.
Ok…
So this, ”first” and now we write it like this.
“First.”
And the 's-t' is usually up.
Ok…
Let's move on to “second”.
'Second' we see that it is 'n-d'.
So the last two letters of 'second', 'n-d'.
'Two', we have to put 'n-d'.
Alright…
So now this is “second”.
“First.”
“Second.”
“Third.”
The last two letters, 'r-d'.
So, we have to go over here…'r-d'.
“Third.”
“Fourth.”
't-h'…..'t-h'.
“Fifth.”
'Five' and again, 't-h'.
“Sixth.”
't-h'.
“Seventh.”
't-h'.
“Eighth.”
't-h'.
“Ninth.”
't-h'.
“Tenth.”
't-h'.
Ok, so you can see most of them use the 't-h'.
Just the “first, second, third”, 's-t', 'n-d', 'r-d'.
You have to be very careful.
Alright…
Look at these numbers over here.
I wrote some numbers, circled in red.
'Three' and 't-h'.
'Three' and 't-h'.
“Threeth.”
“Threeth.”
Ok, this is a common mistake.
This is obviously wrong because 'three' only has 'r-d'.
You have to use these two letters.
This is impossible.
Ok…
So, “threeth”, impossible.
Next one.
“Sic…sic…sicond.”
Again, that is impossible cause “sixth”, “sixth” must have 't-h'.
So this is impossible.
And the last one.
“Ninst.”
“Ninst.”
Well, “ninth.”
“Ninth” must have 't-h'.
So, these are impossible.
So you have to be very careful writing these numbers.
They must use the last two letters.
Ok…
Let's worry about pronunciation right now.
Pronunciation can be a little bit difficult, also.
So let's go through the list.
And you should watch me and listen carefully.
So, “first.”
“Second.”
“Third.”
“Fourth.”
Ok, when I say “Fourth”, look at my tongue.
My tongue comes out.
“Fourth.”
“Fifth.”
“Sixth.”
“Seventh.”
“Eighth.”
“Ninth.”
“Tenth.”
Ok…
So, the 't-h', your tongue should be coming out.
Let's do the 't-h' again.
“Fourth.”
“Fifth.”
“Sixth.”
“Seventh.”
“Eighth.”
“Ninth.”
“Tenth.”
Ok…
So these are the first ten.
You should know these.
Let's move on to some bigger numbers.
Alright, let's continue with our ordinal numbers.
The next, after 'tenth', is “eleventh”.
We see the 't-h' and the 't-h' goes there.
“Eleventh”.
And the next one.”
“Twelfth.”
't-h' And the next one.
I did not write the next ones here, but I will say them, so listen carefully.
So, “eleventh”.
“Twelfth.”
“Thirteenth.”
“Fourteenth.”
“Fifteenth.”
“Sixteenth.”
“Seventeenth.”
“Eighteenth.”
“Nineteenth.”
“Twentieth.”
Alright, let's look at 'twentieth'.
Ok…
So, it's 'twenty'.
'Twenty' has a 'y', but you can they take out the 'y', they put in an 'i-e-t-h'.
This is “twentieth”.
And we would write it with a 't-h'.
'Twenty' with a 't-h'.
“Twentieth.”
Alright, so with the pronunciation, “Twenty, Twentieth.”
“Twentieth.”
“Twentieth.”
After 'twentieth', “Twenty-first.”
Ok, “Twenty-first.”
And we would write 'twenty-one' with the 's-t'.
This is “Twenty-first.”
And again, I did not write the next ones here, but listen carefully.
So, “Twentieth.”
“Twenty-first.”
“Twenty-second.”
“Twenty-third.”
“Twenty-fourth.”
“Twenty-fifth.”
“Twenty-sixth.”
“Twenty-seventh.”
“Twenty-eighth.”
“Twenty-ninth.”
“Thirtieth.”
And again, like 'twentieth', 'thirtieth', no 'y' just 'i-e-t-h'.
“Thirtieth.”
“Thirtieth.”
“Thirtieth.”
Alright…
And I also want to talk about the pronunciation of “twelfth”.
'Twelfth' is very difficult to pronounce.
If you look at it here, you see that 'f'.
And many students try to pronounce it with the 'f'.
“Twelfth.”
Ok, that's very difficult.
But what is actually more common, even with native speakers, is we don't pronounce the
'f'.
We just skip it.
So, for example, if we cut that 'f'.
Imagine it is not there.
“Twelth.”
Ok, that's a little bit easier.
You can just say “Twelth”.
“Twelth.”
Ok…
So again, “Twelfth”.
“Twentieth.”
Ok, be sure to pronounce those correctly.
Let's move on to some bigger number.
Ok, so I am sorry because I cannot write every ordinal number.
Ok…
I cannot explain every number.
So, you're going to have to practice guessing what is the ordinal number.
And I put some numbers here and we're going to guess whether they use 's-t', 'n-d',
'r-d' or 't-h'.
Ok…
We only have four choices.
The first number is “fifty-six”.
So if we want to change that to an ordinal number, we have to choose one of these.
Ok…
So, “fifty-six”.
Well, we know 'six' is…'six' is 't-h'.
“Sixth.”
And it's going to be the same.
“Fifty-sixth.”
So, I'm going to write a 't-h' there.
Let's move on to the next number.
“Ninety-one.”
Well, what's the ordinal number?
“Ninety-oneth?”
No.
This is going to be like 'twenty-first' and 'thirty-first'.
This is going to be “ninety-first”.
Alright, the next one is “one hundred”.
So, we have to choose one of these.
“One hundredst?”
“One hundrednd?”
“One hundredrd?”
“One hundredth?”
Ok, it's going to be the 't-h'.
“One hundredth.”
“One hundredth.”
Alright…
And the next number.
“One oh one.
One hundred one.”
Well, this is like “ninety-first.”
This is “first” again.
“First.”
So, it's going to be “One hundred and first.
One hundred first.”
Alright…
And the last one.
“One thousand.”
We have to choose one.
Well, “One hundredth.
One thousandth.”
Ok, it's going to be the same.
Alright…
So again, I'm sorry I can't teach every number.
Your going to have to learn how to guess correctly.
Ahhh, we're going to do a quick test…right now.
So what I want you to do in the test is write down or think about what the correct ordinal
number is.
Again, just write in the ordinal number.
Number one.
“It is September twentieth.”
“It is September twentieth.”
Alright, so you should've written 'twentieth'.
Number two.
“Seoul National university is ranked first.”
“Seoul National university is ranked first.”
Alright, so you should've written 'first'.
Number three.
“We live in the twenty-first century.”
“We live in the twenty-first century.”
Ok, so you should write 'twenty-first'.
Number four.
“I was born on March seventeenth.”
“I was born on March seventeenth.”
Ok, you should write 'seventeenth'.
And number five.
“We are celebrating our twelfth wedding anniversary.”
“We are celebrating our twelfth wedding anniversary.”
Ok, so you should've written 'twelfth'.
Ok, I hope you did well on that little test.
Ok…
Now, ordinal numbers are important.
Again, they're used for ranking and they're used for the calendar, and also anniversaries.
Also, sometimes, you see book volumes use ordinal numbers.
Ok, so you should know ordinal numbers.
Now, it takes a lot of practice and self-study to truly truly master ordinal numbers.
I hope this video helped you understand them a little bit better.
And, well, that's it.
See you next time.
Hello, everyone.
In this video, we're going to talk about fractions.
Ok…
Now fractions are a little bit difficult to express in English.
So I hope this video will help you understand how to express them in English.
Ok…
So, I wrote a few fractions here.
Of course, this is not all the possible fractions.
This is just a few to help you understand how to express fractions.
Ok…
So these are fractions.
And it doesn't matter.
The line is this way or this way.
Alright, so I'm going to go through the first one here.
And this is probably the most common fraction.
Ok, so we express this as “one half” or “a half”.
Ok…
So as I said, it's very common “half”.
The next one…is, uhhh, “one third”.
“One third.”
Alright, do you remember the ordinal numbers we studied in the previous video?
The ordinal numbers are “first, second, third”.
Well you have to use those here.
So this is “one-three.”?
No.
This is “One-third.”
So, “A half.”
“One-third.”
And the next one is also very common.
It's a very common fraction.
“One-fourth.”
No.
It has a special name.
If you see this, this is “one-quarter” or “a quarter”.
Ok…
So, “A half, one-third, a quarter.”
The next line.
Now, we have “one-third” and you see “two-third”?
Well, 'one' is single.
It's only one.
But two is plural.
So, we don't say “two-third”.
We have to say “two-thirds”.
Ok, we have to add an 's' at the end.
So, “one-third….two-thirds.”
Alright, and let's go on to the next one.
So, “two-fifths.”
“Two-fifths.”
Alright…
The next line, I'm starting with three and, oh, we have the four.
So this is, uhhh, 'one-quarter'.
This is “three-quarters”.
Ok…
This has an 's'.
This has no 's' cause it's singular.
“One-quarter.”
“Three- quarters.”
Ok…
What's this?
“Three-sevenths.”
Ok…
They're very difficult to pronounce.
I know.
Takes a lot of practice.
“Three-sevenths.”
Alright…
The last line.
What's this?
“Five-sixths.”
Ok, this is very difficult to pronounce.
“Five-sixths.”
And the last one.
Ok, sometimes fractions are expressed with a 'whole' number.
So we would say, “two and nine-tenths”.
Ok…
“Two and nine-tenths.”
So you would have to put an 'and' in there.
Alright…
So, uhhh, I hope this helps you understand how to express fractions.
Uhhh, let's do a little bit more practice with our listening.
Alright, so here's a couple of example sentences.
Ahhh, the first one.
“Four-fifths or Canadians speak English.”
“Four-fifths or Canadians speak English.”
Alright, let's look at number two.
“One-third of Korean men smoke.”
“One-third of Korean men smoke.”
Alright, number three.
“I went to a quarter of my English classes.”
“I went to a quarter of my English classes.”
And the last example.
“My shoe size is ten and a half.”
“My shoe size is ten and a half.”
Alright, so that's fractions.
I know, uhhh, it's a little confusing and difficult, but I'm sure, with some self-study,
and practice, you'll know it very well.
Ok…
See you next video.
Hello, everyone.
In this video, we are going to talk about speed.
Ok…
Now, there' two ways to express speed.
There's..uhhh..the Metric System.
Now, the Metric System, that's what we use in Korea and that's what I use in Canada.
But, there's also the Imperial System.
The Imperial System you might see in the U.S.A. or even England.
Ok…
But first, let's look at the Metric System.
Alright, so I'm just going to focus on 'k-m-h'.
And 'k-m-h', of course, is “kilometers per hour”.
“kilometers per hour.”
Notice I emphasize the 's'.
Ok, you always have to express the 's'.
“Kilometers.”
“Kilometers.”
“kilometers per hour.”
Alright, so I just have two examples here cause it's quite easy.
What is this speed?
Well, “Six kilometers per hour.”
Ok, there's no 's' here, but you…again, you always have to say the 's'.
“Six kilometers per hour.”
And the next speed.
“One hundred twenty-five kilometers per hour.”
Ok, let's say it a little faster.
“Six kilometers per hour.”
“One hundred twenty-five kilometers per hour.”
Ok, you hear the 's'?
“Six kilometers per hour.”
Ok, it's very difficult, but it's there.
“Six kilometers per hour.”
“Six kilometers per hour.”
“One hundred twenty-five kilometers per hour.”
Alright, so I've been using the pronunciation of “kilometers”, but some people might
say “kilometers”.
Ok, so both pronunciations are acceptable.
“Kilometers” and “kilometers”.
But more common is “kilometers”.
Ok…
So, let's look at a few example sentences.
Alright, I have three examples here.
The first one.
“The speed limit is one hundred kilometers per hour.”
“The speed limit is one hundred kilometers per hour.”
The second example.
“The KTX travels three hundred kilometers per hour.”
“The KTX travels three hundred kilometers per hour.”
And the last example.
“The average walking speed is five kilometers per hour.”
“The average walking speed is five kilometers per hour.”
Ok, let's talk about the Imperial System.
Again, the Imperial System is commonly used in America, or you might see it in England,
too.
They're going to use 'm-p-h'.
Now 'm-p-h', of course, “miles per hour”.
Again, we have to say “miles per hour”.
“Miles per hour.”
And “one mile per hour” is equal to, about “one point six kilometers per hour”.
Ok…
So again, this is the Imperial System.
This is the Metric System.
Little bit different.
Ok…
So let's practice expressing these two.
The first one.
“Ten miles per hour.”
I'll say it a little faster.
“Ten miles per hour.”
“Ten miles per hour.”
Ok, again, there's the 's'.
“Ten miles per hour.”
And the next one.
“Two hundred and one miles per hour.”
“Two hundred and one miles per hour.”
Be sure to have that 's'.
Ok, that's one of the most common mistakes…uhm…my students make.
They say, “mile per hour.”
“Ten mile per hour.”
Ok, you have to have that 's'.
“Ten mile per hour.”
“Two hundred and one miles per hour.”
Alright…
Let's look at a few examples using 'miles per hour'.
The first one.
“The car was going one hundred miles per hour.”
“The car was going one hundred miles per hour.”
Ok, the second example.
“The airplane travels six hundred miles per hour.”
“The airplane travels six hundred miles per hour.”
And the last example.
“The speed of sound is seven hundred and sixty-one miles per hour.”
“The speed of sound is seven hundred and sixty-one miles per hour.”
Alright, so we learned the Metric System using 'kilometers per hour'.
And we learned the Imperial System using 'miles per hour'.
So again…uhhh.. depends where you are in the world.
Ahh, some countries…actually most countries use the Metric System these days, but probably,
certainly if you're in the U.S.A., they're still using the Imperial System.
Alright…
So, that's it.
I hope you've learned how to express speed.
And..uhh, see you next time.
Hello, everyone.
In this video we are going to talk about 'height', Ok…and how to express it in English.
Now, there are two systems…uhhh…to express 'height'.
The first system is the Metric System.
The Metric System… used in Korea.
Also, Canada, where I'm from.
And the other system is the Imperial System.
The Imperial System used in…especially in America, but sometimes we also use it in Canada.
So, it's good…you should know the Metric System, of course, but you should know a little
bit of the Imperial System, in case you need to use it.
Alright…
Now, first, we're going to talk about the Metric System.
So, take a look.
And I have two questions here.
So, let's just look at the first one.
The first one is asking “How tall are you?”.
“How tall are you?”
Ok…
So, I put my height.
So, “I'm one hundred and eighty-three centimeters tall.”
So, listen again.
“I'm one hundred eighty-three centimeters tall.”
“I'm one hundred eighty-three centimeters… tall.”
“Centimeters…tall” Ok, there's no 's' here, but when you're
reading this, you're reading…or you're saying your height.
You have to use the plural, “centimeters”.
“Centimeters.”
Ok…
“I'm one hundred eighty-three centimeters… tall.”
Don't say, don't say, ”I'm one hundred eighty-three centimeter… tall.”
“One hundred eighty-three centimeters…tall” Ok…got it?
You understand?
Alright, let's look at the next question.
Ok, both questions are asking the same thing, about height.
“What's your height?”
“What's your height?”
Well, “My height is…”, again, “…one hundred eighty-three centimeters…centimeters”,
remember the 's'.
“One hundred eighty-three centimeters.”
So, that's one way to express it, but I also have an example using 'meters'.
So, “My height is one point eight three meters.”
So, if your using 'centimeters' or 'meters', both of them need the 's'.
Ok…
So, one more time.
I'll say it really fast.
“How tall are you?”
“How tall are you?”
“I'm one hundred and eighty-three centimeters tall.”
“I'm one hundred and eighty-three centimeters tall.”
“What's your height?”
“What's your height?”
“My height is one hundred and eighty-three centimeters.”
“My height is one point eighty-three meters.”
Ok, so let's look at a few more examples.
Alright, let's start with the first example.
“He is one hundred and seventy-five centimeters tall.”
“He is one hundred and seventy-five centimeters tall.”
“The sixty-three floor building is two hundred and forty-nine meters high.”
Ok, we use 'tall' for people, but for building we would probably use 'high'
So…
“The sixty-three floor building is two hundred and forty-nine meters high.”
The last example.
“The height of Mount Everest is eight thousand eight hundred and forty-eight meters.”
“The height of Mount Everest is eight thousand eight hundred and forty-eight meters.”
Alright, let's look at the Imperial System now.
The Imperial System is a little more confusing.
Ahhh, so you should…ahhh.. listen carefully.
I have the same question.
“How tall are you?”
But the answer is expressed very differently.
So, “How tall are you?”
“I'm…” this is “…six feet tall”.
“I'm six feet tall.”
Alright, so in the Metric System, “I'm one hundred eighty-three centimeters tall.”
Well in the Imperial System, I would express that, “I'm six feet tall.”
So let's take a look at the Imperial System.
They use 'inches' and 'feet'.
Ok…
So one inch…is equal to two point five four centimeters.
And one foot…is equal to thirty point four eight centimeters.
Alright, so, look at this.
“One foot.”
They say “one foot”.
“Two foot?”
No.
“One foot.”
“Two feet.”
“Three feet.”
“I am six feet.”
Ok…
So the singular is 'foot', for one, but the plural is 'feet'.
Alright…
So, they're going to show their height like this.
And how do we read this?
Well, this is “five feet”.
The first number is 'feet'.
“Five feet”.
They're going to put this.
“Seven inches.”
Ok, so this person is “five feet seven inches”.
Now if you look at mine, I'm “six feet zero inches”.
“Zero inches.”
Ok, but this is the inch place, so “five feet seven inches”.
And they write it like this.
Ok…
Let's look at a few more examples of the imperial system.
Alright, so here's the first example.
“The Empire State Building rises to one thousand two hundred and fifty feet.”
“The Empire State Building rises to one thousand two hundred and fifty feet.”
The next example.
“My mom is five foot two inches tall.”
“My mom is five foot two inches tall.”
The last example.
“The basketball player is seven feet two inches tall.”
“The basketball player is seven feet two inches tall.”
Alright, so, now we know how to express…uhh.. height in the Metric System and the Imperial
System.
Ok…
Again, probably in Korea, we're just going to use the Metric System.
But if you're talking to an American, they might only understand the Imperial System.
Ok, so you should know how to express your height both ways.
So, again, “I'm one hundred eighty-three centimeters tall.”
Or…
“My height is one hundred eighty-three centimeters.”
But I could also express that, “I'm…ahh… six feet tall.”
Alright…
That's height.
And see you next time.
Hello, everyone.
In this video, we're going to talk about a very sensitive topic; weight…or how much
you weigh.
Alright…
Again, there's two systems.
There's the Metric System using kilograms.
And there's the Imperial System that they will use in the U.S.A. using pounds.
But first, let's look at the Metric System…using kilograms.
Ok…
So, there's two questions again.
The most common questions to ask someone about their weight.
So let's look at the first question.
The first question, “How much do you weigh?”
“How much do you weigh?”
Now, notice I don't put “weight”.
Ok…
'Weigh' is a verb and 'weight' is a noun.
This questions, we have to use 'weigh'.
“How much do you weigh?”
And your answer.
“I weigh seventy-five kilograms.”
Ok, that's my weight.
“I weigh seventy-five kilograms.”
Now listen.
I say “Seventy-five kilograms.”
“Kilograms.”
Don't forget the 's' at the end.
“Kilograms.”
“I weigh seventy-five kilograms.”
Let's look at this answer.
“I weight seventy-five kilograms.”
Ok, you see this 'x'?
That means it's wrong.
Ok, never say, “I weight…”
This is wrong.
It's “I weigh…”
“I weigh…”
“I weight seventy-five kilograms.”
Ok, so this is wrong.
Do not say this.
Let's move on to the next question.
“What's your weight?”
Ok, now it's using the noun form.
“What's your weight?”
“My weight is seventy-five kilograms.”
Ok…
Again, “My weigh…My weigh…is seventy-five kilograms.”
'X' again.
Don't use that.
“What's your weight?”
“My weight is seventy-five kilograms.”
Don't use this.
Ok, it's a little bit confusing.
Especially the 'weigh' and the 'weight'.
Takes a lot of practice.
Ok, I'm going to say these again, really fast.
So, listen carefully.
“How much do you weigh?”
“I weigh seventy-five kilograms.”
“How much do you weigh?”
“I weigh seventy-five kilograms.”
“What's your weight?”
“My weight is seventy-five kilograms.”
“What's your weight?”
“My weight is seventy-five kilograms.”
Ok, let's look at a few example sentences.
Alright, the first example sentence…
“I gained fifteen kilograms over the summer.”
“I gained fifteen kilograms over the summer.”
The next one.
“I'm fat.
I weigh one hundred kilograms.”
“I'm fat.
I weigh one hundred kilograms.”
And the last one.
“I need to lose forty kilograms.”
“I need to lose forty kilograms.”
Ok, let's talk about the Imperial System, now.
So, remember, the Metric System uses kilograms and grams.
The Imperial System…it's going to use ounces and pounds.
Ok…
So, let's take a look.
Here's my question, again.
“How much do you weigh?”
And before, I…
I said, “I weigh seventy-five kilograms.”
Well, in the Imperial System, “I weight one hundred and sixty-five pound.”
This means 'pounds'.
Ok, so let's take a look at the two systems.
So, again, we use.. in the Metric, 'grams', they're going to use 'ounce'.
So one ounce is about…about twenty-eight grams.
Ok…
And one pound is about point four five kilograms.
Ok…
So, these are not exact numbers, it's just 'around'.
Ok…
Now, how to write one pound…
This is “one pound”.
Ok…
This is not a 'one'.
This is actually an 'l'.
'l-b' 'l-b'
One 'l-b'.
That means “one pound”.
Now 'pound' starts with 'p'.
So, why do they write 'l-b'?
Well 'l-b' is actually from old latin.
It comes from a latin term; libra pondo.
But, don't worry about the latin term.
That's very old, but still, these days, we use 'l-b'.
That just means 'pound'.
So, “one pound.”
Ok, this is single, 'one'.
Now we got two.
“Pounds.”
We usually write the 's'.
'l-b-s'.
“One pound.”
“Two pounds.”
For the 'ounces'.
'One' 'oh' 'zee'.
Ok, 'one' 'oh' 'zee'.
“One ounce.”
“One ounce.”
“Two ounce.”
It's always 'oh' 'zee' Sometimes you're going to see 'one'
'f-l-o-z'.
Now, the 'f-l' means 'fluid'.
Fluid is like a liquid.
Like water.
“Fluid…ounce” And you're always going to see this on stuff
like perfume or cologne.
Ahhh…if you check your perfume or cologne at home, I'm sure you're going to see
this.
Ahhh…you're not going to see the 'one'.
It's going to be a bigger number, but you're going to see the 'f-l-o-z'.
Alright, so that's the Imperial System.
It's an older system.
It's a little more complicated and confusing.
Alright…
But my weight in the Imperial System is “a hundred and sixty-five pound.”
Let's take a look at a few more examples of how to express weight in the Imperial System.
Alright, the first example…
“A baby weighs nine pounds at birth.”
“A baby weighs nine pounds at birth.”
The next example.
“The fattest cat in the world weighs forty pounds.”
“The fattest cat in the world weighs forty pounds.”
The last example.
“His weight is a hundred pounds.”
“His weight is a hundred pounds.”
“How much do you weigh?”
Ok, that's a very serious and private question.
Ok, so, if you don't want to answer that question, maybe you should say, “no comment”.
Anyway, we learned how to express weight in the Metric System.
“I weigh seventy-five kilograms.”
And the Imperial System.
“I weigh a hundred and sixty-five pounds.”
Ahhh, of course, the Metric System is easier than the Imperial System.
To know and study.
But, you should be familiar with both systems.
Alright, so that's it and I'll see you next video.
Whew….ahhh, it's sure hot in this studio.
And it sounds like a good time to talk about temperature.
So, that's what we're going to do in this video.
We're going to talk about how to express 'temperature' in English.
Now, you should know there's two systems.
There's the American system.
They use 'Fahrenheit'.
And, of course, there's the system we use in Korea and I use in Canada; 'Celsius'.
Ok, we're going to talk about the Fahrenheit System, later, but first, let's focus on
'Celsius'.
So, look at the board.
And…I'm going to start with this question.
“What's the temperature?”
“What's the temperature outside?”
You should begin your answer with “It's”.
Ok, “What's the temperature?”
“It's…”, and I have many ways to express the temperature.
Let's start up here.
So, “What's the temperature?”
“It's…”, this symbol means 'plus'.
Ok…
“Plus.”
This means it is above zero degrees.
Ok, it's warm.
“It's plus twenty degrees…”
Ok, this symbol always means 'degrees'.
“…Celsius.”
“Celsius.”
“Celsius.”
Ok…
It's very difficult to say.
“Celsius.”
'Celsius' is spelled with a capital 'c'.
Big 'c'.
Be careful here.
Many people write a 'c'.
This is an 's'.
Ok…
So, “What's the temperature?”
“It's plus twenty degrees celsius.”
Ok, that's a good way to express the temperature.
Now, the 'plus'…some people say 'plus', but you don't have to say 'plus'.
Ok, you can just say, “What's the temperature?”
“It's twenty degrees Celsius.”
It means the same thing.
Let's move down here.
The next one.
“What's the temperature?”
“It's twenty degrees centigrade.”
“Centigrade?”
What is that?
Well, 'Celsius' and 'Centigrade'…these are the same temperatures.
Ok, just 'Centigrade' is the old English style.
Ok…
So, actually, I don't want you to say “Centigrade”.
I want you to only use “Celsius”.
But I'm teaching you might hear 'Centigrade'.
Some older people might say “Centigrade”.
Ok, so you hear “Centigrade”, but you speak only “Celsius”.
Alright…
Let's move to the next one.
Ahhh, “What's the temperature?”
“It's twenty degrees 'c'.”
“It's twenty degrees 'c'.”
Ok, some people are going to shorten 'Celsius' to just 'c'.
“It's twenty degrees 'c'.”
And, actually, more common…we can shorten that more and cut that.
And this is the most common way to express the temperature.
“What's the temperature?”
“It's twenty degrees.”
Ok…
So when people say, “It's twenty degrees.”
I know it's 'celsius'.
And I know it's 'plus'.
Ok…
This one…ahhh…
“What's the temperature?”
“It's twenty above.”
“Twenty above.”
Ok, so 'zero degrees'….and twenty above.
“Twenty degrees above zero.”
So, “What's the temperature?”
“It's twenty above.”
This.
This.
This.
This.
They're all the same temperature.
Ok…
“Zero degrees.”
Freezing.
We're getting cold.
Let's go down here.
“What's the temperature?”
“It's twenty below.”
Ok, so this is 'above' zero.
And this is below 'zero degrees'.
So, 'zero', going down…cold.
“It's twenty below.”
Very cold.
Let's move to the last one.
“What's the temperature?”
“It's…”, this symbol is 'minus'.
This is 'plus'.
This is 'minus'.
'Minus' is very scary cause it's freezing.
It's cold.
“It's minus twenty degrees celsius.”
If you told me that “It's minus twenty degrees Celsius outside,” I do not want
to go outside.
That's very cold.
So, “What's the temperature?”
“It's twenty degrees.”
“What's the temperature?”
“It's minus twenty degrees.”
Ok, those are the best ways to express it.
Alright, so I hope you understand how to express 'Celsius'.
Ahhh, let's look at a few more examples.
Alright, the first example…
“The temperature outside is fifteen degrees Celsius.”
“The temperature outside is fifteen degrees Celsius.”
The next example.
“Water freezes at zero degrees 'c'.”
“Water freezes at zero degrees 'c'.”
And the last example.
“It's cold outside.
It's about three degrees below zero.”
“It's cold outside.
It's about three degrees below zero.”
Now, we're going to talk about what they use in America.
In the U.S.A.
They don't use 'Celsius'.
They use Fahrenheit.”
Ok…
So, same question.
“What's the temperature?”
“What's the temperature outside?”
“It's sixty-eight degrees…,” that's the same, “f”.
Instead of 'c', they're going to use an 'f'.
And that's “Sixty-eight degrees…”, this is the spelling, oh it's very difficult
to spell, even for me.
“Fahrenheit”.
Ok, we pronounce that “Fahrenheit”.
So, “Twenty-degrees Celsius,” is the same as “Sixty-eight degrees Fahrenheit”.
Ok…
And you should also know…freezing…the freezing temperature.
“Zero degrees Celsius,” is the same as “Thirty-two degrees Fahrenheit”.
Alright, so if you go to the U.S.A., and you're watching TV, all the weather, everything,
they're always using Fahrenheit.
And it can be very confusing.
So, I would say, try to remember this.
So, you can kind of guess how hot it is.
Alright, let's look at a few examples of Fahrenheit.
The first example…
“A human's body temperature is usually ninety-eight point six degrees Fahrenheit.”
“A human's body temperature is usually ninety-eight point six degrees Fahrenheit.”
The second example…
“Room temperature is about seventy degrees Fahrenheit.”
“Room temperature is about seventy degrees Fahrenheit.”
And the last example…
“Water freezes at thirty-two degrees.”
“Water freezes at thirty-two degrees.”
Alright, so there you go.
There's the Celsius System and the Fahrenheit System.
Ahhh, they're very very different and they can be very confusing.
Alright, so, if you're going to the U.S.A., you should try to…ahh…learn the Fahrenheit
System.
Anyway, I hope you understood what I was trying to teach you today..ahhh..
That's it.
See you next time.
Hello, everyone.
In this video, I'm going to talk about roman numerals.
So, roman numerals are letters that mean numbers.
Roman numerals are not so common, but you can see them every day.
Ok, so especially, on a clock or a watch.
They often use roman numerals.
Ahhh.. in.. on book volumes and chapters of books, they use roman numerals… ahhh.. a
lot of the time.
The Olympics usually express the year in roman numerals.
Ok, so you will see roman numerals, so you should know, at least the first ten.
Ok…
Now, let's take a look here.
I wrote the first ten.
And you can see the first one, 'I'.
Now, 'I' is written like this and this means 'one'.
And the second one is 'I-I'; 'two'.
The third one.
'I-I-I'; 'three'.
So, one two and three.. so those are the very…the easiest ones.
Ok, after that, it gets a little more difficult.
So, one two three.
And the next one is 'four'.
And it looks like this 'I-V'.
Now what is 'V'?
Well, quickly, let's go to 'five'.
And you can see 'V' is 'five'.
Alright, 'V' is 'five'.
So, let's go back.
'V' We know this is 'five'.
And 'I'.
So 'I' is 'one'.
So 'I' is one before 'five'.
And that's 'four'.
Ok…
So one…one number before five is four.
And then 'five'.
Let's go to the next side.
Six seven eight nine ten.
Now, if you notice…I…I wrote them a little bit different.
Let's go down here first.
Now you can write the roman numeral two styles.
One style is with a line at the top and the bottom.
And another style, there's no line.
Ok, this and this mean the same thing.
So this is 'one' and this is 'one'.
You can see that again with 'five'.
So you can write it with the lines at the top and the 'V'.
Or…no lines, just 'V'.
Again, they mean the same thing.
So this side, I wrote the lines.
This side, I didn't write the lines.
Doesn't matter.
Alright…
So let's continue.
This was 'four'.
This was 'five'.
“Six.”
Now 'six', 'V' and 'I'.
So 'V' we know is 'five'.
'I' we know is 'one'.
So, 'five' and 'one' is 'six'.
So, you notice, 'I-V'.
'One' before 'five'.
'Four'.
'V-I'.
'Six'.
'V-I-I'.
'Seven'.
'V-I-I-I'.
'Eight'.
So, five six seven eight.
Alright, then it gets complicated again.
'I-X' is 'nine'.
Ok, so 'X', 'X' is 'ten'.
Ok…
So like 'four'.
'One' before 'five' is 'four'.
One number before 'ten' is 'nine'.
'I-X' that means 'nine'.
And, of course, 'ten' is 'X'.
Alright…let's move on to some bigger roman numerals.
Now, I told you..
ahh..
'X' is 'ten'.
Now, 'X' and 'I'.
So 'ten' and 'one'.
That's 'eleven'.
'X-I-I'.
That's 'twelve'.
Alright…
So up until 'twelve' are the most common roman numerals cause those are the ones on
the clock.
'One' to 'twelve'.
So you should really know 'One' to 'twelve'.
Ok…
Now, the next ones are not so common.
Ok…
You rarely rarely see them.
But let's continue anyways.
So after 'twelve', we're going to jump to 'twenty'.
And 'twenty' is 'X-X'.
So, ten ten.
Ten ten means twenty.
'X-X-V'.
We know 'V' is 'five'.
'X-X-V'.
'Twenty-five'.
Ok, let's jump more.
'X-X' is 'twenty'.
'X-X-X'.
'Thirty'.
And then the next one.
'X-L' 'X-L' is 'forty'.
Well, what is 'L'?
'L' is 'fifty'.
So, 'X' is 'ten'.
Again, ten before fifty.
So, ten before fifty is 'forty'.
So this means 'forty'.
Ten before fifty.
'L' is 'fifty'.
'L-I'.
'Fifty-one'.
'Fifty-one'.
'X-C' is 'ninety'.
Well, what is 'C'?
'C' is 'one hundred'.
So, 'X' is ten before one hundred.
So, ten before one hundred is 'ninety'.
And of course, 'C', 'one hundred'.
Ok, so again, these ones are not so common.
So, you don't have to worry about this so much.
But anyway, let's continue to some bigger roman numerals
Ok, so here are some bigger roman numerals.
Now, we know 'C' is 'one hundred'.
Let's go to this one.
'C-D'.
'C-D' is 'four hundred'.
Well, what is 'D'?
'D' is 'five hundred'.
So, 'C-D' means one hundred before five hundred.
So, that is 'four hundred'.
'Five hundred' 'M'.
'M' is the last letter we use in roman numerals.
'M' is 'one thousand'.
ok…
'M-D'.
Well, 'D' is 'five hundred'.
'M' is 'one thousand', so 'one thousand five hundred”.
'M-D'.
And the last one here.
A really big number.
'M-D-C-C-C'.
Ok, so one thousand five hundred…and one hundred, two hundred, three hundred…the
total here is eighteen hundred.
Ok…
So that…that's roman numerals.
Let's do a little more practice.
Ok, let's do a little practice together.
I know it's difficult.
So let's take a look at these letters.
'L-X-V'.
What is that?
'L-X-V'.
Well, we know 'L' is 'fifty'.
Oh, but it's followed by 'X'.
So, 'fifty' and 'X' is 'ten', so fifty plus ten is 'sixty'.
And 'V'.
What is 'V'?
'V' is 'five'.
So, fifty plus ten is sixty plus 'V' is five.
So, this….'sixty-five'.
Alright, the next one.
'X-X-I-X'.
Hmmm…
Well, we know 'X' is 'ten'.
And 'X-X', 'ten', 'ten'.
'Twenty'.
And 'one'.
“Twenty-one'.
'X'.
Ohhh…this is confusing.
Ahhh…first we have to look at these.
Ok, what is this number?
'I-X'?
Well, 'I-X' is…uhhh…'nine'.
One before 'X' is 'nine'.
So, 'X-X' is 'twenty' and 'nine'.
So, 'twenty-nine'.
'C-V'.
Well, 'C'…
What's 'C'?
That's a hundred.