Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • - [Announcer] The broadcast is now starting.

  • All attendees are in listen only mode.

  • - [Vicki] Hi, everybody.

  • Thanks so much for joining us today.

  • I'm Vicki Lang,

  • I'm a learning scientist here at Khan Academy.

  • And I'm joined by Dan from our marketing team,

  • who will be facilitating our Q&A

  • toward the end of the broadcast.

  • And a special guest, Dr. Lindsay Portnoy,

  • she's a cognitive scientist from Northeastern University,

  • who recently published a book called, "Designed to Learn."

  • She's an expert in using design principles

  • to work with kids in schools.

  • And she's a parent of two children herself.

  • So she's home working, managing multiple kids,

  • and is a great expert to draw from

  • for this broadcast today.

  • Before we launch into the topic,

  • I just wanna thank our sponsors,

  • Bank of America, Google.org, Novartis, Fastly, and AT&T,

  • for supporting this broadcast as well as other webinars

  • that we're providing during this time of crisis.

  • So, we've been getting a lot of questions

  • about how do I survive at home with multiple children

  • who have different schedules and different needs,

  • and different assignments and there's only one of me,

  • or there's two of me, however many,

  • and how do we do this?

  • So, we brought this expert here to talk with you

  • about some ideas for that and I'm gonna let her kick it off.

  • - [Lindsay] Thank you, Vicky.

  • Thank you for having me everyone.

  • I'm excited to be here today.

  • So, yeah as Vicki has mentioned,

  • I have been working in education for quite some time,

  • and when this whole event transpired,

  • I quickly moved to figure out what it was

  • that we were going to do to help support our kids,

  • and community, some sense of scaffolding and support,

  • in a time of very uncertainty.

  • And so, what I have shared for you today,

  • is something that I like to call, "The Five C's

  • "For Bringing Your "A" Game."

  • And, what I realized is that we really are

  • a very faithful family, and we do very much seek the joy

  • in all of the learning that we try to do at home.

  • And so, the C's that I'd like to share with you

  • are clarity, curation, creativity, curiosity and compassion.

  • And I'm gonna go through each of these

  • and show you of how they addressed those mean questions

  • that Vicki has shared previously.

  • And Vicki, hopefully, you can help me along here

  • to make sure that we're getting the most important pieces.

  • But the idea is that we're trying to keep it

  • as simple as possible.

  • We're trying to be as realistic as possible,

  • given the current constraints.

  • As (mumbles) now we have lost power.

  • So it's always something exciting and new,

  • but simplicity with consistency

  • and always leaving room for iteration.

  • The first C for clarity,

  • I think is a really big overarching concept,

  • which is basically about establishing expectations,

  • understanding communications and resources.

  • And it is really to address this question here about,

  • what ideas you have for scheduling

  • with such a diverse group.

  • So as Vicki and I were talking

  • I shared with my game plan.

  • So we use gaming as the analogy,

  • what's the game plan with our team?

  • So beginning of each week,

  • if we have a teacher that's sending us a week case.

  • So what has to be done and by whom?

  • And I've created this really simple and fun looking calendar

  • that my kiddos are now at this point quite used to

  • in week eight.

  • And they know what's happening at every time,

  • where they will find what they need,

  • and where we will find what we need to help support them,

  • where everyone will be in the house in terms of space.

  • We'll talk about that later.

  • And then when you know it's time to stop what you're doing

  • and have a break and eat and relax

  • and stretch and just and check in with us.

  • Also, another really important part of clarity

  • for us has been, why are you doing what you're doing

  • and when are you going to get feedback

  • on the work that you're doing?

  • And that really is about communication

  • and I'll show you later on.

  • This is just the big game plan sheet that we have,

  • but later on I'll show you a little bit about

  • how I should check in about with my kids as they're working

  • without necessarily getting up

  • and having to physically go to them

  • and sit with them every second of the day,

  • which became pretty burdensome pretty quickly.

  • Does that makes sense?

  • - [Vicki] Yeah, that makes lots of sense.

  • And it doesn't work perfectly.

  • We just saw I was distracted 'cause my six year old came in

  • and had a question for me.

  • So it doesn't work perfectly.

  • But we have a schedule also at our house

  • and we've done another webinar on that with Khan Academy.

  • And this idea of clarity

  • and just the kids being on the same page as the adults

  • of understanding what's happening when

  • and who to get helpful with

  • and why they're doing what they're doing

  • is really, really important.

  • So how do they know what to work on Lindsay?

  • And how do you prepare it for them?

  • - [Lindsay] Good question, that's a great question.

  • So the next C is curation.

  • And curation is really all about preparation.

  • So predicting what they're gonna need and when

  • and planning ahead.

  • And this reminded me of the question

  • that I saw which is,

  • how much active caregiver engagement

  • should I aim for and when?

  • When should I be available?

  • Because like many folks out there, we're working full time.

  • And so we have to ensure that we're doing our work.

  • So again, this is a similar picture

  • to the other one, but this is our schedule.

  • And the idea is, we have to know ahead of time

  • what the work is that they have to be doing in each day.

  • But we also have to predict what problems may arise

  • and whether it's my two boys getting in an argument

  • over who gets to use the computer at this time

  • or figuring out what hang ups they might have to log into,

  • one of the platforms they use in my kids' school is Clever.

  • So if they have trouble logging in, where can they go

  • and just anticipating what potential issues they may have.

  • And then also making sure that the materials

  • that they need are accessible for them.

  • That they know which space they're gonna be sitting in

  • and when in terms of timing for each child.

  • We try to figure out a day in advance if we can,

  • sometimes the week

  • and that we can see, who's gonna need more time and when.

  • I mean, I don't know how you're feeling with your kiddo

  • but for us, this has been really helpful

  • just to know ahead of time,

  • what information we're gonna need to give to them

  • so that we can have it in one place.

  • I circled here for you the hyperlinks,

  • I'm a big fan of hyperlinking

  • because that way they know where their schedule is,

  • everything is in Google Doc.

  • And then they click on the hyperlink

  • and it takes them right to where they have to go.

  • And there's no questioning,

  • they don't have to come and ask me for the the website

  • or the access or whatever, it's already all there.

  • It's like baked into the document.

  • - [Vicki] Yeah, and this makes me--

  • Oh, sorry, go ahead.

  • - [Lindsay] No, I was wondering,

  • is this similar to what you're using?

  • - [Vicki] Yeah.

  • And it makes me think of when I was in the classroom,

  • I was a fifth and sixth grade teacher

  • and one of the most fundamental things you're doing

  • when you're a teacher is anticipating roadblocks

  • that kids are gonna hit

  • and questions that they're gonna have

  • and trying to set them up for success in advance.