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  • Japanese cars will.....

  • .... work very hard!!!

  • CLEAN

  • That's a big thing for both

  • And that's something we have in common.

  • Green man!!!

  • The "taking off street shoes"

  • That's common.

  • With a beer

  • Hi guys it's me Cathy Cat if you don't speak German...

  • be sure to click on the subtitles so you can see the English subtitles

  • of this video.

  • For everyone else let's start in German and....

  • Off we go!

  • This time we will talk about 8 things that Germany and Japan have in common.

  • Similarities that Japan and Germany both share.

  • Well let's find out what that is....

  • Germany and Japan are famous for.....

  • their car brands.

  • In Germany we drive Japanese cars and some Japanese cars are (obviously)

  • driven in Japan.

  • The thought is that those cars use less gasoline or that they are a status symbol.

  • Another thought that Germany and Japan share is the thought that...

  • the cars from Germany and Japan are said to be safe cars.

  • That might be a big industrial thing that we have in common...

  • Which also includes the cars as big part of the export industry.

  • That's a big thing for us and we share that.

  • Germany and Japan have the reputation that they are...

  • very hard working. Meaning their industry and their workers,

  • are working very hard and quite a lot.

  • And we are thought to be "effective" workers.

  • I think we Germans love the "effectively working"

  • working culture. We will sometimes work extra time

  • In order to finish a project and such.

  • In Japan that's done to a whole new level though.

  • Here people stay at work VERY LATE sometimes.

  • And some overtime here isn't even paid.

  • But concerning Germany and Japan

  • we share the image that we are hard workers.

  • Germany and Japan has the reputation for being cleanly countries.

  • Clean streets or clean stores and especially the German housewifes ....

  • are said to be great cleaners....

  • And the Japanese housewives are super cleaners too.

  • Seems to be some kind of cleansy fad.

  • Maybe that is something.....

  • we both value?

  • I think that's more a cliche

  • But it seems that's one of the reasons

  • for putting us in the same box at times.

  • CLEANSY!

  • What INCREDIBLY surprised me, when I went to the UK....

  • Was that one of my professors at my university said....

  • "You are all coming too late anyways so we will start class 15 minutes later"

  • That is not heard of in Germany.

  • And also in Japan, coming late for class is a big NO

  • Of course it can happen sometimes to anyone.

  • But generally Germans and Japanese are very punctual people.

  • To be honest we are OVER-punctual

  • Being a few minutes EARLY means you are on time.

  • Arriving on just the right time...

  • like when you said you are meeting at 12:00 and you're there at 12:00....

  • is sometimes LATE in the eyes of others.

  • Same in Japan.

  • So Germans and Japanese really value it if other people are punctual.

  • Especially here in Japan, when you.....

  • should arrive slightly late for a date....

  • it could RUIN you whole day.

  • In Japan you have to take an extra step to make up for it....

  • and the other person had to wait some time...

  • It's a sign of good manners that you will treat the other person to something

  • In order to make it up to them.

  • Invite them for a coffee or icecream.

  • Because they waited for you so long.

  • Are you doing the same?

  • Let us know in the comments.

  • Really, being punctual is a BIG ISSUE in both countries.

  • The formal language when communicating with others!

  • That's something Japanese and Germans share.

  • In the UK everyone can be referred to as "you"

  • Even though it was different in the old days.

  • In Japan and Germany we have two different types of language. One for normal

  • casual conversation and one more formal language that we use for

  • our friend's parents or our professors at the university

  • Formal language to express respect.

  • Having that as part of you language might make a big difference.

  • ESPECIALLY in the Japanese language.

  • There are actually 2 ways of polite language. Polite Language and then

  • SUPER polite language for special people.

  • It's really important to remember which type of formal language is used for whom.

  • That connects everything back to

  • cultural aspects too. So if you don't have that in your native language

  • It could be hard to understand at first.

  • It makes learning Japanese language a little bit harder.

  • I found it good to know that there is a formal language in Japanese.

  • We have that in Germany too.

  • Whoever I would refer to in the polite German "Sie" I would refer to in the polite Japanese lingo too.

  • So another thing we share.

  • We are waiting for the little green man!!!

  • That's something we have in common!!!

  • The pedestrians will not cross when there is a red traffic light.

  • Generally speaking.

  • I was super surprised to see people in the UK J-Walk and cross the traffic lights still.

  • In Germany in Japan, even when there is no cars around....

  • We are obeying the little green man.

  • We wait until our traffic light is green. Crossing the pedestrian lights when it's red is a nono.

  • And that does not seem to be a common thing.

  • And that's probably a reason why other countries tell us that we have....

  • A stick up our butts.... what's the word for that....

  • We are too "Majime", following too many rules.

  • We might follow the rules a little bit too much at times.

  • Oh I said "stick in the butt"... ???

  • Oh no we got to cut that out of the video..... nevermind... so next...

  • We follow the rules, sometimes above and beyond...

  • Because that's what we are supposed to do, so we do it.

  • And that's why the green man is in charge.

  • Street shoes off, house slippers on!

  • In many German households you don't wear street shoes inside.

  • You take them off in the hallway.

  • And then swap them for slippers or warm socks

  • Same in Japan, a lot more strict though.

  • I generally prefer not to walk with my dirty outdoor shoes in my bedroom.

  • We share that but in Japan it's practiced more strictly.

  • There we have designated shoes for designated purposes.

  • Normal slippers, guest only slippers,

  • then the toilet only slippers, and the balcony slippers.

  • You should never confuse them.

  • Many Japanese visitors confuse them at times.

  • Especially accidentally wearing the toilet slippers in the house.

  • That's always a little embarassing.

  • Happened to me MANY times.

  • Generally the "taking outdoor shoes off" thing is a common trait.

  • The end of the work day is often celebrated with a beer!

  • And surprisingly that's the same in Japan!

  • I was super surprised. When Japanese people...

  • go to a restaurant or bar in the evening.

  • The first thing that gets ordered is a beer.

  • All the other drinks like rice wine and shochu....

  • Are coming later.

  • But the very first thing Japanese people drink is generally a beer.

  • Guys that's a thing we got in common ey.

  • Great stuff.

  • Of course non-alcoholic beers included. They also exist in Japan.

  • Great stuff.

  • Those are some things we got in common.

  • I know Germany has a reputation as being beer-country

  • Surprisingly Japanese people really like Beers too.

  • What is also interesting is that beer is the very first drink.

  • But beer glasses in Japan are often a lot smaller.

  • So you can keep refilling someone else's glass easier.

  • Filling someone else's glass is important in Japan.

  • Contrary in Germany there are HUGE beer jugs we keep drinking from.

  • There are some differences but those will be...

  • discussed in a future video with you.

  • So you can hear more about the vital differences between those countries.

  • I have made more videos where I compare Germany and Japan

  • If you are interested in that, there is more!

  • There is a playlist for that. Find your way there.

  • If you haven't been together with our channel that long yet.

  • Well if you don't know this channel much yet.

  • Would be nice if you could subscribe to this channel or my personal channel

  • Subscribe! Wait that's "aboniert" in German.

  • My name is Cathy Cat. If my speaking in German sounds strange to you...

  • Then that is because I generally do interviews with Japanese people

  • and international people here in Japan.

  • So I generally only speak Japanese and English and my German....has gone a little....

  • rusty... I think.....

  • I hope you liked the video anyways.

  • Would be nice to see more of you on the Ask Japanese channel or my personal channel

  • The "Cathy Cat" channel.

  • I hope you will subscribe and I will see you guys again soon!

  • See you for other videos. Bye!

Japanese cars will.....