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  • always make sure to fact check.

  • Welcome to watch Mojo.

  • And today we're counting down our picks for the top 10 fake medical scares for this list.

  • We're talking about public health scares that caused panic but were later completely debunked.

  • Number 10 5 G conspiracies.

  • We'll look at that.

  • Everyone on their cellphones Nobody's saying award to each other.

  • Since the use of cell phones became widespread, there has been no shortage of conspiracy theories about what dangers they may cause that they produce harmful radiation capable of giving you cancer.

  • For instance, thes fears persist today, with many people touting the same old lines in protests against the rollout of five G.

  • The next level of mobile network cell companies have criticized the protesters is just trying to frighten people.

  • And officials have repeatedly insisted that there is absolutely no evidence that five G's dangerous and in early 2020 conspiracy theories that five G is to blame for the global pandemic even gained ground.

  • Despite this making absolutely no sense number nine the dangers of power lines, there are some undeniable danger surrounding power lines.

  • Cute, definitely don't want to touch one, for example, because they're carrying potentially fatal amounts of electricity.

  • But in the 19 seventies, a theory emerged that power lines were to blame for childhood leukemia.

  • Studies were published stating that Children living within roughly 2000 feet of power lines had a greater risk of developing leukaemia.

  • It took a long time for this to be developed.

  • However.

  • It wasn't until an Oxford University study was published in 2014 that it was thoroughly proven that there was absolutely no connection between power lines and cancer.

  • Thank you, Doctor.

  • No, I'm not a doctor.

  • Number eight Cancer Causing Shampoo Did you use that cocoa?

  • But a shampoo back in the days when an email chain was the best way to distribute fake information, a rumor that the chemicals sodium laurel sulfate, a common ingredient in shampoo, might be causing cancer gained traction.

  • That's because SLS is also found in more powerful cleaners, which makes people think it's not something they should be putting on their hair.

  • SLS is in all sorts of topical beauty products, including toothpaste, bubble bath and face masks, and even in some food products, marshmallows, for instance.

  • Rest assured, there is no evidence that SLS will cause you harm in small quantities in larger quantities.

  • It will irritate your skin, but it still won't give you a terminal disease.

  • Number seven office printers cause lung damage No, not again.

  • We've been working alongside printers for decades, and most people probably have one in their home.

  • But is your printers secretly killing you on Australian study, published in 2007 seem to think so and deduced that HP office printers release ultra fine particles or U F piece of toner and ink into the air.

  • They said that this was a dangerous is inhaling secondhand smoke.

  • While it's true that you FPs are listed as pollutants, there's no evidence to prove that printers of all varieties including three D produce anywhere near enough you FPs to be considered dangerous.

  • Scientists do agree that more research should be conducted, but this particular study was widely criticized for its inaccuracy.

  • Number six corn syrup causes obesity are off chocolate, but I can't theme us is grappling with an obesity epidemic, and many researchers are still trying to understand the cause.

  • One easy thing to blame is high fructose corn syrup used throughout food manufacturing instead of regular sugar because it's cheaper.

  • HFCs isn't exactly good for you.

  • Just like consuming too much of anything has its dangers.

  • But a theory that emerged in 2004 suggested that HFCs causes obesity because people consuming it can't tell when they're full.

  • This is not true.

  • Of all the health problems corn syrup is proven to cause, like liver disease or diabetes, it's not going to trick you into thinking you have an empty stomach.

  • Your best bet is to cut down on sweet foods of all types.

  • Number five lipstick Contains dangerous levels of lead Lipstick.

  • What craziness you're talking about women.

  • There's no lipstick.

  • In 2003 an environmental group published an exhaustive investigation of lipsticks on sale in the U.

  • S.

  • And found that many leading brands contain lead consuming lead.

  • It's something you should avoid at all costs.

  • So how did this slip under the radar of the FDA?

  • Well, because lipstick isn't food, so the trace amounts of lead some lipsticks contain in the dies they use aren't deemed to be dangerous unless you're actually eating and swallowing large quantities of lipstick, which you shouldn't be doing anyway.

  • You're not at risk of lead poisoning the FDA and other bodies have thoroughly investigated, and they all ruled that lipstick lead levels are not a cause for concern.

  • Number four.

  • Using tampons to get drunk e think I just got an idea for a song.

  • It's called rum soaked Tampon.

  • Now what were you guys talking about in 2009?

  • And a few times since rumors have circulated that teens have been soaking tampons in vodka and inserting them to try and get drunk.

  • This new story is as bizarre as it is false.

  • There have been almost no reported cases of anybody.

  • Using fraud could cover tampons as a way to consume alcohol on the down low, just to be safe.

  • Many doctors were interviewed about what effect this would have, and the verdict is unanimous.

  • It's dangerous, and it won't even get you that drunk.

  • The average tampon can only hold 1.5 ounces of vodka at most.

  • The equivalent of one shot.

  • You'd be much better off drinking it normally.

  • Number three.

  • Ask pertain controversy.

  • Does it have aspirin?

  • No.

  • A convincing email hoax was to blame for another unfounded conspiracy, this time that aspartame an important ingredient in some artificial sweeteners could cause conditions like multiple sclerosis, Lupus, depression and even blindness.

  • This email was written by Nancy Marcal, a made up woman, and circulated in 1998 one of many incidents surrounding aspartame and whether it's safe.

  • The FDA and other scientific bodies, including the European Food Safety Authority, have repeatedly found that aspartame is safe.

  • But to this day it remains a source of rumors due to its prevalence and sugar alternatives and diet sodas, for instance, Number two fluoride lowers I.

  • Q.

  • Fluoride is used by the Communists to control our minds.

  • No, it's not.

  • Fluoride can control minds like you can use it to make ladies do stuff.

  • For years, fluoride has been put into the water supply in many countries to try and prevent tooth decay.

  • And for just a long, it's been a source of concern.

  • One popular conspiracy stated that if a pregnant person consumes fluoride, it may lower the I Q of their child.

  • One study, carried out in Canada found that for every one milligram of additional Florida mother consumes their child's I Q drops slightly, but researchers stress that this does not prove cause and effect, and the results are not conclusive.

  • The study didn't take into account other factors that could affect a child's I Q score and ignored the fact that this correlation was only observed in boys.

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  • Number one.

  • Vaccines cause autism.

  • You're so concerned with stuff like Don't get him vaccinated.

  • Don't let him eat fish.

  • There's mercury in the water.

  • Jesus!

  • How much Dateline NBC can you watch?

  • The rate of autism diagnoses has risen in recent years, but this is simply because we're getting better at understanding it.

  • It's not, as many would have you believe, because of the MMR vaccine designed to prevent a measles, mumps and rubella.

  • But this story has stuck due to a 1998 study written by Andrew Wakefield, who has since had his medical license revoked.

  • He argued that the MMR vaccine causes autism, which has given rise to the anti vaccine movement.

  • However, there is absolutely no evidence to support this.

  • Then, in 2015 a rumor broke out that anti vax.

  • Her parents were holding measles parties to infect their kids to develop immunity rather than getting their kids vaccinated.

  • But this, too, was fake news.

  • Do you agree with our picks?

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always make sure to fact check.

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Top 10 Faked Medical Scares

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/04/23
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