Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • you do.

  • Have you ever thought of the sheer number decisions that you make in a given day and of you then fought about the impact of just one of those decisions they may have on the day on a project, maybe an organizational move and maybe even on your whole life.

  • And the truth is, decisions do matter now.

  • What I'd like you to do is think about this.

  • There are 7.5 billion people on this planet.

  • And what if just want If every single person on earth could make one better decision every day, what would the world be like?

  • I think it would be amazing.

  • What I'm going to do is take you on a journey today and the 1st 1 I'm going to start off this concept that in orderto have one better decision.

  • We have to help the individual make one better decision every day.

  • Then once we have that, we can share it.

  • And what I'd like to do to start off with is to kind of go through what our brain goes through when we're making that decision.

  • Must have been 15 years ago.

  • I don't have the date.

  • I remember asking myself, How many decisions do I make in a day?

  • And of course you have to go to Google And I typed into Google and a bunch of research reports came out and none of them impressed me.

  • They didn't really have data I thought I could work with, but one stood out.

  • A study from Cornell University did research on the number of decisions an individual makes just around food.

  • So take a guess.

  • How many decisions do you think in a given day you make based solely around food?

  • Is it 30?

  • Is it 60 90 one?

  • 20?

  • An average human makes approximately 300 decisions per day, just based around food.

  • 300 decisions.

  • So if we were, then do some math.

  • If we did one better decision per day that seven decisions per week and 365 decisions in a year.

  • February 15th of next year 2001.

  • What would your life be like if you just made one better decision every single day?

  • If you work for an organization and you have 50 employees in that organization, working with you in every single one of them made one better decision.

  • You're looking at 100 and 25,000 better decisions.

  • Those are massive numbers.

  • They're exciting.

  • And you can almost get the sense that a small decision you make every day is the seedling for unbelievable change.

  • Which brings me to this guy by the name of Edward Larenz.

  • I didn't know this guy's name is a mathematician in a meteorologist and what he was looking at was the impact off how climate could be altered by influences of the environment.

  • And he looked at what would happen if a butterfly flapped its wings.

  • And two weeks later there was a tornado.

  • We always bay.

  • I've always basis on Brazil.

  • If a butterfly flaps its wings in Brazil, what would happen across the ocean?

  • But it came from this guy study and what he was showing that an insignificant decision and significant a consequence of these flapping of the wings could change the entire future.

  • It's called the Butterfly Effect.

  • So if we were to goto organizations and I worked all over the world profit, nonprofit government, military and education, one thing that I found is leaders are so intent on moving forward that they rush to make decisions.

  • They want to make decisions tohave things happen in their organization.

  • And by doing so, what they do is they ve they've sacrificed outcomes for the sake of motion.

  • And I know where it comes from.

  • We value activity well beyond what we do in activity.

  • But when you're thinking we are active, it's just a different type of activity.

  • We are active.

  • So this idleness is a misnomer in a bad place to start when you're thinking about thinking.

  • So, of course, we have to have a business slide.

  • It's not complicated.

  • What it says is that when we start off, we come up with an idea, and the minute we make a decision, we start in motion.

  • We started motion.

  • Resource is in capital and we have mind set.

  • We have cultural movements.

  • We have so many things happening.

  • But what if we had spun, spend a little bit more time trying to figure out what we're really trying to accomplish with that chart, be so much more different.

  • So what I'm going to do is change a vocabulary for you.

  • I personally don't like the word problem.

  • So when these were challenged to represent both the problem and an opportunity.

  • A problem?

  • People don't like them.

  • You kind of stop if I got a problem for you.

  • If I said you have an opportunity.

  • Yeah, but if I said I have a challenge even in your head, you just said maybe we can solve that.

  • So I'm going to use the word challenge from now on.

  • But what it also does is it gets engagement.

  • The word challenge is something that people say I can solve this.

  • I could work on it.

  • So here's your own audience participation part right now, What I'd like you to do is think about your biggest challenge.

  • It's so much better if you could write it down.

  • We don't have the time here because I'm going to skip over mountain tops and give you some tools.

  • But think of it.

  • Do you have one?

  • Okay, here's a shocker.

  • The minute you created your challenge, you most like he embedded into it and started thinking about solutions.

  • You already started in the motion of decision making.

  • Where do I go?

  • How do I solve it?

  • What do I do?

  • And we have to stop that behavior and we can We can do it by using a simple set of tools.

  • But before I go there, let's do this.

  • Ask yourself itself.

  • Do I have a process to solve that challenge?

  • I mean, a natural process, like the steps I would follow with my challenge to solve it.

  • And if you did, it would probably be transferrable, meaning a process is transferrable.

  • Meaning you taught your Children.

  • You talked.

  • Your friends use it at work.

  • Every day.

  • I want I can make gold.

  • Therefore, I'm gonna teach you how to make gold, and I would want you to follow it because it makes gold.

  • It's all so you could be in a process.

  • You could become an expert at it.

  • You can refine it, and lastly, it's repeatable.

  • We could do it over and over again.

  • So if you have a process or you think you have a process, most people believe they do, and they leave to chance the possibility that something's going to happen Positive.

  • But what if we could improve it just by having a process?

  • So when one side of the screen you've got a split screen here, I can't give the timeline.

  • I worked on this for about three years, I one day wrote down what I consider people's process to be, including my own.

  • First you look at what's a goal or what's your problem?

  • Then what you're going to do is figure out a solution or some options.

  • You're going to maybe do some research, and then you gonna select when you move on.

  • And then I went out into the real world and asked people, What is their process?

  • And people don't have one.

  • So they sit there, Who?

  • How would I?

  • How would I solve your biggest challenge?

  • What would you have done?

  • And they start going through it and this is an example.

  • Identify.

  • The problem is up there.

  • Brainstorm ideas, Select an idea implement.

  • And I love this measure and start again like you're not supposed to start again.

  • You just solved that or here's another one and I've got hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of these.

  • This person added a formula component into it.

  • What they did is they did list positive and negatives being creative, but notice in their process.

  • They don't even have doing it well.

  • That's what happens when you go grocery shopping.

  • You forget your list.

  • You always pick up what you don't need.

  • You forget the one thing you didn't need.

  • And then you have to go all the way back and forth.

  • It's almost double the time.

  • Because when you forget something, it's significant.

  • And this person try again.

  • I love the try again.

  • Like I know I'm not gonna be good at this.

  • And if you work in an organization, you've been through this experience.

  • Where you been?

  • In a meeting.

  • Any type of environment like this.

  • Someone says, Does anybody have any problems?

  • Someone raises her hand.

  • It could be you.

  • You see, my problem is this.

  • And people said, Can you help?

  • Sure.

  • And you're writing down all these notes.

  • Very good.

  • I like that idea.

  • Then you might pick one and move on.

  • Move forward.

  • We don't ask.

  • Are you picking the right challenge?

  • We just don't ask that question.

  • And it's the equivalent of I love this analogy.

  • It's my analogy I love.

  • This is if you take a laser beam employment to the moon and you're off by just a centimetre one way or the other, you will miss the moon.

  • It's almost like those butterflies flapping the wings that little difference makes all the difference in the world.

  • So how do you improve decision making you improve decision making by precisely and clearly defining the challenge.

  • You're looking this off.

  • It requires asking better questions.

  • And we're not talking how to ask questions.

  • So where do you start?

  • You might be asking, How do I make this happen for May?

  • It's not complicated, but I'm going to tell you this is just a snippet of a tool called redefining.

  • You start with this.

  • You must first right down your challenge in one sentence.

  • What it does is it forces you to do word, choice and precision.

  • It forces you to clarify what you're solving, and once that's in front of you now you've got a baseline to work from.

  • Next, you're going to ask a series of questions.

  • And I like the word scrubbing because what we're gonna do scrub that challenge statement and make it cleaner and crisper by identifying challenges that are in the statement I've made to make it clearer.

  • If and how it works is you will clean your challenge statement, you'll look at it, make sure it works, and if it fails, you have to start again, rewrite it and start from the beginning.

  • If you did it right, you could move to the next step.

  • So let's take one.

  • The 1st 1 here is your challenge.

  • Statement.

  • One issue.

  • Let's say I was in front of you when I said my pants were too short and I have to be in Madrid tomorrow.

  • Would you tell me those are two different issues?

  • You solve them differently.

  • You would immediately react.

  • Take care of your pants and take care of being in Madrid.

  • They're not the same, but we do that.

  • That's a macro example of how bad it could be.

  • But let's take the one that's on the screen right now.

  • I want to sell it online membership for $300 I don't want people copying it.

  • How many challenges do you see?

  • How many issues do you see in there?

  • I hear some people see to icy fingers.

  • Some people see three, but maybe there's four.

  • I want to sell online $300.

  • People copying it don't even notice these things.

  • You don't even notice them because we've been in green not to.

  • Here's a trick you can create one challenge statement that solves many issues.

  • But you cannot create a challenge state with many issues and solve them all at once, so you can have a very big idea that solves a lot of issues.

  • But you can't do the other.

  • Let's take another one.

  • Is your challenge statement not a goal?

  • I work with startups often on dhe, incubators and all tip of environments, and you'll hear people say my biggest challenges.

  • I want to make $100 million.

  • No challenge statement ever big.

  • It has a goal in it because a goal begins with a challenge.

  • Google did not set out to find a $1,000,000,000 business that once in their challenge, their challenge was they had an issue with organizing and finding information on the Web, which eventually became a $1,000,000,000 business.

  • You have to make sure that embedded in your challenge statement is no goals or even direction.

  • Let's give the next one is your challenge Statement of problem as compared to a solution sentences here.

  • My sales people need more sales training.

  • I think about it for a moment.

  • I see I squint thing.

  • My sales people need more sales training So if you took this is your challenge, Damon.

  • What you've already done has made some jumps.

  • What if it's your product is at a date?

  • What if your pricing is wrong?

  • What if your markets wrong?

  • What if your shipping lanes you've already eliminated all of that?

  • You've gone out.

  • You've hired some great sales trainers.

  • You modified your process.

  • You might, when you're done, have fantastic sales people, but no sales.

  • So you have to look to see if there's a problem.

  • Your challenge statement must be in the present tense.

  • This one's tougher, so I'm gonna give you a really easy one to get your mind around women in the audience, ladies in the audience your best friend comes to.

  • She lays her head on your shoulder and she says on she starts crying.

  • My husband had cheated on me.

  • How do you solve that?

  • Now?

  • I'm not gonna ask for answers for a Ted talk, but I've gotten some pretty brutal answers from this.

  • But what if, while she's crying, she says to you, You say, What's wrong?

  • What's wrong?

  • And she says, I'm having trouble getting over that My husband had cheated on me.

  • Five years ago.

  • Would you treat that differently than my husband is still out?

  • And he cheated on me last night?

  • You'd address the issue differently, so it has to be in the present tense.

  • Next.

  • One of the facts.

  • Verifiable.

  • Can you verify those facts?

  • So when the retail industry there's this term called Shrink it shrinkage is theft internally from your own company.

  • So what happens if you heard you walked in?

  • You own it, Chef in the warehouse shrinkage is at 14%.

  • I mean, you could go ballistic.

  • You be firing people.

  • But what if you verify some facts and found out that it's a computer glitch and it's actually less than 1% in retail?

  • You might even pass that by and say, I've got other priorities that I've gotta work on.

  • Challenge Statement Must be, is something free?

  • This was fought in the news in the media in the early two thousands by a lot of organization by McDonald's and the fast food McDonald's makes people fat.

  • I think about the assumption.