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  • Good afternoon.

  • I'm Commander Ibad Khan, and I'm representing the Clinical

  • Outreach Communication Activity, COCA,

  • with the Emergency Risk Communication Branch

  • at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

  • I'd like to welcome you to today's COCA call:

  • 2019 to 2020 Influenza Season Update

  • and Recommendations for Clinicians.

  • Please stay tuned until the end of this COCA call

  • for more information about two upcoming COCA calls

  • on HHS guidance on opioid dosage reduction or discontinuation,

  • as well as another one on the novel Coronavirus outbreak.

  • Both calls will take place later this week.

  • You may participate in today's presentation via webinar,

  • or you may download the slides if you're unable

  • to access the webinar.

  • The PowerPoint slides and the webinar link can be found on our

  • COCA webpage at emergency.cdc.gov/COCA.

  • Again, that web address is emergency.cdc.gov/COCA.

  • Once you reach the webinar page,

  • the PowerPoint slides can be found

  • under the call materials tab.

  • Free continuing education is offered for this webinar.

  • Instructions on how to earn continuing education will be

  • provided at the end of the call.

  • In compliance with continuing education requirements, CDC,

  • our planners, our presenters, and their spouses/partners wish

  • to disclose they have no financial interests

  • or other relationships with the manufacturers

  • of commercial products,

  • suppliers of commercial services,

  • or commercial supporters.

  • Planners have reviewed content to ensure there is no bias.

  • The presentation will not include any discussion

  • of the unlabeled use of a product or a product

  • under investigational use, expect Dr. Angela Campbell would

  • like to disclose that she will discuss the off-label use

  • of antiviral medications for treatment of influenza.

  • CDC did not accept commercial support

  • for this continuing education activity.

  • After the presentation, there will be a Q and A session.

  • You may submit questions at any time during the presentation

  • through the Zoom webinar system by clicking the Q and A button

  • at the bottom of your screen, and then typing your question.

  • Please do not ask a question using the Chat button.

  • Questions regarding the webinar should be entered using only the

  • Q and A button.

  • Those who may have media questions,

  • please contact CDC Media Relations at 404-639-3286,

  • or send an email to media@cdc.gov.

  • If you are a patient, please refer your questions

  • to your healthcare provider.

  • At the conclusion of today's webinar,

  • participants will be able to accomplish the following.

  • Describe the current status

  • of influenza activity in the United States.

  • Describe the circulating influenza viruses detected this

  • season, and explain the implications for clinicians.

  • And describe antiviral testing and treatment recommendations

  • for patients with suspected and confirmed influenza.

  • Now I would like to introduce our presenters

  • for today's webinar.

  • Our first presenter is Miss Alicia Budd.

  • Miss Budd is an epidemiologist in CDC's Influenza Division.

  • Miss Budd has been at CDC for more than 13 years,

  • and has worked on national influenza surveillance

  • for most of that time.

  • She also has experience in infection control,

  • having spent 6 years at the Johns Hopkins hospital,

  • in the Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control department.

  • Our second presenter is Dr. Angela Campbell.

  • Dr. Campbell is a medical officer

  • in CDC's Influenza Division.

  • Her projects focus on studies of influenza

  • and antiviral treatment, and antiviral effectiveness,

  • vaccine effectiveness, pandemic preparedness, and development

  • of CDC clinical guidance related to treatment and prevention

  • of seasonal and novel influenza viruses.

  • She is an adjunct associate professor of pediatrics

  • at Emory University School of Medicine,

  • and has a professional staff appointment

  • at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta.

  • I will now turn it over to Miss Alicia Budd.

  • Miss Budd, you may proceed.

  • >> Thank you.

  • So today I'll be giving an update

  • on the current influenza season, based on activity

  • that we've received-- or data we've received, rather,

  • about activity occurring through January 18 of this year.

  • Next.

  • So before I launch-- oops.

  • Next slide.

  • Before I launch into an actual update on activity,

  • I just wanted to briefly explain how we get all this information

  • in that I will be talking about.

  • So flu surveillance

  • on the national level is really a collaborative effort

  • between those of us at CDC, and also our public health partners

  • at the state and local level and territories,

  • and also numerous other data providers, many of whom are

  • at the clinical level.

  • And our role at CDC is really to coordinate the system

  • that all those various partners make possible.

  • So we get data from five categories of flu activity

  • from eight different sources.

  • Three of those have to do with the virus tracking itself.

  • Two have to do with flu-related mortality,

  • and then we have one each that focus on outpatient visits,

  • hospitalizations and the geographic spread

  • of flu activity in general.

  • And every week we analyze that information,

  • and we make it available to the public in the form of FluView

  • which is a static report, and FluView Interactive,

  • which is a system online that really lets you dive deeper

  • into the data on different geographic levels,

  • different time frames, and things like that.

  • And those are both available on the internet,

  • and in the resource slide at the end,

  • you'll have those web pages.

  • Next.

  • So the goals with the flu surveillance really haven't

  • changed, even though the system has been in place

  • over many, many years.

  • Some of the systems have changed.

  • Some of the data we get in have changed, but really all along,

  • we're focused on identifying and characterizing the viruses

  • that are circulating, with a special eye towards making sure

  • that any viruses with pandemic potential would be

  • recognized early.

  • We also are doing flu surveillance

  • to provide situational awareness about the onset of the season,

  • where we are in the season in terms of activity increasing

  • or decreasing, and where in the country activity is occurring.

  • We're also of course looking at the severity of the flu season,

  • and whether it looks like things are what we would expect,

  • or maybe a bit higher or lower.

  • And then, we're looking of course

  • to describe the clinical infections,

  • and those at most risk, and all of this really

  • with the eye towards how we can guide decisions

  • about interventions.

  • Next.

  • So now I'm going to move into where we are with this season.

  • So this slide shows what we're seeing in terms

  • of influenza virus circulation, based on the data

  • that have been reported to us from clinical labs

  • and public health labs across the country.

  • So clinical labs test specimens primarily

  • for diagnostic purposes, and we use the data from these labs

  • to calculate the percent of specimens that they're testing

  • that are positive for influenza.

  • And with this data, we can track the timing of the season,

  • and the intensity of flu activity.

  • So this season, activity was low in October,

  • and began to increase in November,

  • but then really took off in December.

  • We had a slight decrease in activity the first two weeks

  • of January, and we're starting to see an increase again now

  • in the third week of January.

  • And there's a number of reasons that this might be occurring.

  • That decrease could be related to a slight decrease

  • in transmission that occurred because kids were out of school

  • for a couple of weeks around the holidays.

  • It could be that that highest peak there is somewhat impacted

  • by changes in healthcare-seeking behavior over the holidays,

  • and it was sort of an auto-data correction bit

  • that we saw there with the decline.

  • Or it could be, and I'll talk

  • about this a little bit more later,

  • it could be that we're switching over from seeing sort

  • of an increase in B activity, and now we're seeing more

  • of an increase in A activity.

  • But things haven't quite evened out yet.

  • So regardless, we are definitely seeing high levels of activity,