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  • - You know, so we're watching the story

  • about the Toy Hall of Fame, which is in Rochester.

  • And we're seeing all the toys that are being inducted

  • and so everyone in the office starts talking

  • about their favorite toys growing up, right?

  • So some people are like "Oh yeah, no

  • for me it was Shoots and Ladders,

  • and for me it was the sled,

  • and for me it was this, it was that."

  • And then, the people were like,

  • "What was your favorite, favorite toy growing up?"

  • And I was like, "Genuinely,

  • my favorite toy growing up was a brick."

  • (audience laughs)

  • All right, which sounds crazy

  • but, Spinny why do you walk away like I'm a crazy?

  • (audience laughs)

  • like you literally walk away

  • like I'm saying the wildest thing.

  • No cause we, so what happened was no,

  • we had, when we were growing up I'd live

  • at my Gran's house in Soweto,

  • and then what would happen is,

  • a lot of kids didn't have toys,

  • but it wasn't like a sad thing

  • like "Oh, I don't have toys."

  • It was like we'd play with whatever we find.

  • And so the most popular thing little boys would play

  • with was bricks, and your brick was,

  • you'd play with it like a toy car.

  • So you'd walk around the neighborhood searching

  • for the best brick, all right?

  • 'Cause the game you would play,

  • we didn't put wheels on it or anything,

  • like someone asked in the office,

  • they're like, "Did you put wheels on?"

  • No, there's no wheels, where were we gonna find wheels?

  • If we have wheels, we wouldn't have these problems.

  • (audience laughs) So we just took bricks,

  • so you would find bricks,

  • and then the game you'd play is you'd drive around

  • in the dirt with your brick car,

  • and then you would smash into the other boys' bricks,

  • and then if your brick was the last brick standing,

  • you won the game.

  • So, like all of us, it was like a mission.

  • You're like, "Man, I gotta find bricks, I gotta."

  • You just walk around the whole day, just searching

  • for bricks, and there's this one brick

  • that we had called a face brick, all right?

  • Which is basically like a really beautiful brick

  • that you can, you know bricks that you don't plaster over?

  • 'Cause you have that as the face of your house,

  • that's why you would call it the face brick, right?

  • And so, that was like the dream brick.

  • It was the most expensive brick, though.

  • You couldn't, you'd find everyone

  • with gray bricks and the dark black bricks

  • and all those, but those bricks break.

  • You come with a face brick, everyone would see you,

  • you'd pitch up, you'd be like a pimp rolling up

  • in a Rolls-Royce Phantom, like genuinely.

  • I remember one day I found the face brick,

  • and you know I got the, all the kids were like (car noises).

  • And I've got the little swag, and they're like,

  • "Oh Trevor, are you playing, are you playing?"

  • And then I was like, "Yeah."

  • and I pulled my brick out from behind my back.

  • And they're like (gasps) "Face brick, face brick."

  • And it's like, "Now he has a face brick, face brick."

  • And it's like, "Let's go."

  • And then you drive, and then everyone rams in,

  • and I'll be like, "You guys ram me first, I'll just chill."

  • And everyone tries to ram your brick,

  • and because it's a face brick,

  • it's compact, it doesn't crack,

  • and everyone's brick crack in half,

  • people are devastated.

  • You see kids smash their brick,

  • and the brick cracks dead in the middle,

  • and they're like (cries dramatically)

  • (cries out in foreign language)

  • It's like a big thing.

  • And then you'd play, and you'd take the brick,

  • and it was such a popular thing

  • that you had to be careful if you lived in the townships

  • because kids would steal bricks from outside your house

  • if you were doing renovations,

  • so if you weren't careful,

  • you would have all your bricks outside,

  • 'cause you're like, "Oh I'm gonna build a wall."

  • And then the next day you would come there,

  • and you'd be like, "Where the fuck are my bricks?"

  • (audience laughs)

  • And all the bricks are gone,

  • and there's just kids driving around, like (car noises).

  • It's like, "Are those my bricks?"

  • "I don't know what you're talking about, man.

  • This is my favorite toy."

  • It just makes you realize, you can just have fun

  • with anything, man, it was, that was genuinely my favorite.

  • Even now when I see bricks, I get happy.

  • Like I said to friends,

  • that's the one thing I don't like about living

  • in New York, you don't see bricks often,

  • just loose bricks hanging around.

  • You take that for granted, I walk around, I'm like,

  • "Man, no bricks, no bricks, no bricks, no bricks."

  • And if I see a brick, there's a thing in me still

  • to this day that wants to take the brick,

  • and I have to stop myself and be like,

  • "You're the host of 'The Daily Show'.

  • You can buy all the bricks you want."

  • And it's like, "Yeah, but take that brick Trevor,

  • come on, you know you want to."

  • And I was thinking, imagine if TMZ caught me on camera,

  • and it's like, "Trevor Noah spotted stealing a brick."

  • And then I'd be trying to explain it,

  • "No, it's a car, no it's not a" (laughs)

  • "Is Trevor Noah oh drugs?"

  • "No wait, it's so strong."

  • "What were you doing Trevor?"

  • "I was gonna build my own wall."

  • (audience laughs)

  • That's what South Africa, you guys,

  • you should let Donald Trump build the wall,

  • and then just bring all the South African kids overnight.

  • (audience claps and laughs)

  • And they'll just like take the.

  • So in my grandmother's house,

  • we didn't have a tap in the house.

  • We had one tap shared amongst four houses,

  • and that seemed cool compared to my cousins

  • because in the villages, they had one tap,

  • which was like a mile away.

  • So I'd go to my cousins to visit them

  • for the holidays, and then I would,

  • my cousin would wake me up at like 5 a.m.,

  • I'd be like, "Dude, what are you doing?"

  • He's like, "We gotta go get water."

  • And I'm like, "What?"

  • And then you get the wheelbarrow,

  • and then you go, and it's fun when you're on the way there

  • 'cause you're like, "This is fun."

  • You've got your wheelbarrow, you're rolling.

  • And then you fill up, you forget that you have

  • to fill them up with water.

  • So these giant, giant, giant drums of water,

  • and then you bring them back,

  • and your like, "Fuck."

  • The whole time, you're just like,

  • "I don't need water, I don't need water."

  • And then one day I took,

  • 'cause my cousin was shredded just because of that.

  • Every single day was just him lifting a barrel.

  • It was like 400 pounds on a wheelbarrow,

  • just pushing that every single day.

  • And then one day I remember, I was like, "I can do this."

  • And I took it, and I was like, "Oh, oh, oh oh"

  • And then all the water gone.

  • (audience gasps) Just like all of it.

  • And then I was like, "Well, well,

  • you shouldn't have let me take the wheelbarrow."

  • I just pulled a Ben Carson,

  • I was like, "That was your bad."

  • Did I know my life would turn out like this

  • since I was a kid?

  • Yeah, yeah, yeah, I remember when I was like four years old,

  • and there was like this little kid who pushed me

  • to the ground, and then I was like,

  • "Ha, one day I'm gonna be the host of 'The Daily Show'."

  • No, I get what you're saying,

  • and I'm joking obviously, I'm being facetious.

  • No, I had