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  • I'm actually here

  • to make a challenge to people.

  • I know there have been many challenges made to people.

  • The one I'm going to make

  • is that it is time for us to reclaim

  • what peace really means.

  • Peace is not "Kumbaya, my Lord."

  • Peace is not the dove and the rainbow --

  • as lovely as they are.

  • When I see the symbols

  • of the rainbow and the dove,

  • I think of personal serenity.

  • I think of meditation.

  • I do not think

  • about what I consider to be peace,

  • which is sustainable peace

  • with justice and equality.

  • It is a sustainable peace

  • in which the majority of people

  • on this planet

  • have access to enough resources

  • to live dignified lives,

  • where these people have enough access

  • to education

  • and health care,

  • so that they can live in freedom from want

  • and freedom from fear.

  • This is called human security.

  • And I am not a complete pacifist

  • like some of my really, really heavy-duty,

  • non-violent friends,

  • like Mairead McGuire.

  • I understand that humans

  • are so "messed up" --

  • to use a nice word,

  • because I promised my mom

  • I'd stop using the F-bomb in public.

  • And I'm trying harder and harder.

  • Mom, I'm really trying.

  • We need a little bit of police;

  • we need a little bit of military,

  • but for defense.

  • We need to redefine

  • what makes us secure

  • in this world.

  • It is not arming our country

  • to the teeth.

  • It is not getting other countries

  • to arm themselves to the teeth

  • with the weapons that we produce

  • and we sell them.

  • It is using that money more rationally

  • to make the countries of the world secure,

  • to make the people of the world secure.

  • I was thinking about

  • the recent ongoings

  • in Congress,

  • where the president is offering

  • 8.4 billion dollars

  • to try to get the START vote.

  • I certainly support the START vote.

  • But he's offering 84 billion dollars

  • for the modernizing

  • of nuclear weapons.

  • Do you know the figure that the U.N. talks about

  • for fulfilling the Millennium Development Goals

  • is 80 billion dollars?

  • Just that little bit of money,

  • which to me, I wish it was in my bank account --

  • it's not, but ...

  • In global terms, it's a little bit of money.

  • But it's going to modernize weapons

  • we do not need

  • and will not be gotten rid of in our lifetime,

  • unless we get up off our ...

  • and take action to make it happen,

  • unless we begin to believe

  • that all of the things that we've been hearing about

  • in these last two days

  • are elements of what come together

  • to make human security.

  • It is saving the tigers.

  • It is stopping the tar sands.

  • It is having access

  • to medical equipment

  • that can actually tell who does have cancer.

  • It is all of those things.

  • It is using our money for all of those things.

  • It is about action.

  • I was in Hiroshima

  • a couple of weeks ago,

  • and His Holiness --

  • we're sitting there in front of thousands of people in the city,

  • and there were about eight of us Nobel laureates.

  • And he's a bad guy. He's like a bad kid in church.

  • We're staring at everybody, waiting our turn to speak,

  • and he leans over to me, and he says,

  • "Jody, I'm a Buddhist monk."

  • I said, "Yes, Your Holiness.

  • Your robe gives it away."

  • (Laughter)

  • He said, "You know

  • that I kind of like meditation, and I pray."

  • I said, "That's good. That's good.

  • We need that in the world.

  • I don't follow that, but that's cool."

  • And he says, "But I have become skeptical.

  • I do not believe

  • that meditation and prayer

  • will change this world.

  • I think what we need

  • is action."

  • His Holiness, in his robes,

  • is my new action hero.

  • I spoke with Aung Sun Suu Kyi

  • a couple of days ago.

  • As most of you know,

  • she's a hero for democracy in her country, Burma.

  • You probably also know

  • that she has spent 15 of the last 20 years

  • imprisoned for her efforts

  • to bring about democracy.

  • She was just released a couple of weeks ago,

  • and we're very concerned to see how long she will be free,

  • because she is already out in the streets in Rangoon,

  • agitating for change.

  • She is already out in the streets, working with the party

  • to try to rebuild it.

  • But I talked to her for a range of issues.

  • But one thing that I want to say,

  • because it's similar to what His Holiness said.

  • She said, "You know, we have a long road to go

  • to finally get democracy in my country.

  • But I don't believe in hope

  • without endeavor.

  • I don't believe in the hope of change,

  • unless we take action

  • to make it so."

  • Here's another woman hero of mine.

  • She's my friend, Dr. Shirin Ebadi,

  • the first Muslim woman

  • to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

  • She has been in exile

  • for the last year and a half.

  • You ask her where she lives -- where does she live in exile?

  • She says the airports of the world.

  • She is traveling because she was out of the country

  • at the time of the elections.

  • And instead of going home,

  • she conferred with all the other women that she works with,

  • who said to her, "Stay out. We need you out.

  • We need to be able to talk to you out there,

  • so that you can give the message

  • of what's happening here."

  • A year and a half --

  • she's out speaking

  • on behalf of the other women in her country.

  • Wangari Maathai --

  • 2004 Peace laureate.

  • They call her the "Tree Lady,"

  • but she's more than the Tree Lady.

  • Working for peace

  • is very creative.

  • It's hard work every day.

  • When she was planting those trees,

  • I don't think most people understand

  • that, at the same time,

  • she was using the action

  • of getting people together to plant those trees

  • to talk about how to overcome

  • the authoritarian government in her country.

  • People could not gather

  • without getting busted and taken to jail.

  • But if they were together planting trees for the environment,

  • it was okay --

  • creativity.

  • But it's not just iconic women

  • like Shirin,

  • like Aung Sun Suu Kyi, like Wangari Maathai --

  • it is other women in the world

  • who are also struggling together

  • to change this world.

  • The Women's League of Burma,

  • 11 individual organizations of Burmese women

  • came together because there's strength in numbers.

  • Working together is what changes our world.

  • The Million Signatures Campaign

  • of women inside Burma

  • working together to change human rights,

  • to bring democracy to that country.

  • When one is arrested and taken to prison,

  • another one comes out and joins the movement,

  • recognizing that if they work together,

  • they will ultimately bring change

  • in their own country.

  • Mairead McGuire in the middle,

  • Betty Williams on the right-hand side --

  • bringing peace to Northern Ireland.

  • I'll tell you the quick story.

  • An IRA driver was shot,

  • and his car plowed into people

  • on the side of the street.

  • There was a mother and three children.

  • The children were killed on the spot.

  • It was Mairead's sister.

  • Instead of giving in

  • to grief, depression, defeat

  • in the face of that violence,

  • Mairead hooked up with Betty --

  • a staunch Protestant and a staunch Catholic --

  • and they took to the streets

  • to say, "No more violence."

  • And they were able to get

  • tens of thousands of, primarily, women, some men,

  • in the streets to bring about change.

  • And they have been

  • part of what brought peace to Northern Ireland,

  • and they're still working on it,

  • because there's still a lot more to do.

  • This is Rigoberta Menchu Tum.

  • She also received the Peace Prize.

  • She is now running for president.

  • She is educating the indigenous people of her country

  • about what it means to be a democracy,

  • about how you bring democracy to the country,

  • about educating, about how to vote --

  • but that democracy is not just about voting;

  • it's about being an active citizen.

  • That's what I got stuck doing --

  • the landmine campaign.

  • One of the things that made this campaign work

  • is because we grew from two NGOs

  • to thousands

  • in 90 countries around the world,

  • working together in common cause to ban landmines.

  • Some of the people who worked in our campaign

  • could only work maybe an hour a month.

  • They could maybe volunteer that much.

  • There were others, like myself,

  • who were full-time.

  • But it was the actions, together, of all of us

  • that brought about that change.

  • In my view, what we need today

  • is people getting up

  • and taking action

  • to reclaim the meaning of peace.

  • It's not a dirty word.

  • It's hard work every single day.

  • And if each of us

  • who cares about the different things we care about

  • got up off our butts

  • and volunteered

  • as much time as we could,

  • we would change this world,

  • we would save this world.

  • And we can't wait for the other guy. We have to do it ourselves.

  • Thank you.

  • (Applause)

I'm actually here

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B1 TED peace democracy country holiness world

【TED】Jody Williams: A realistic vision for world peace (Jody Williams: A realistic vision for world peace)

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    VoiceTube posted on 2014/03/30