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  • >> Hello, JSConf holy Cow!

  • There are so many of you.

  • This is the biggest conference I've ever been to, and it is also, I'm embarrassed to say,

  • this is my first JSConf EU.

  • I kept trying to come but I had immigration issues and all sorts of stuff, and I made

  • it just in lime for the last one.

  • I'm extra specially thrilled to be here and be invited to speak, but before we get started,

  • the way that I don't die of nervousness is I always take a speaker selfie, but there

  • are millions of you, so I'm going to take a bunch.

  • Look happy!

  • Like you just heard the best talk of your life!

  • Amazing.

  • All right.

  • With that important business out of the way, hello, everybody, I'm Laurie.

  • I'm one of the co-founders of npm Inc, one of the chief data officers there, but what

  • I really am is a web developer, making the web bigger, and better, and more accessible

  • to everyone is what drives me, and it's been driving me for 23 years now, which means sometimes

  • I meet people who are younger than my web development career!

  • Which is weird.

  • And, today, I'm here to talk about JavaScript.

  • I'm going to talk about who we are, the people who write JavaScript.

  • I'm talking about where we use JavaScript, and what we are doing with it today, and also

  • I'm going to talk about why, the forces that are driving us to the state that we are in

  • right now.

  • Finally, I'm going to talk about what comes next.

  • Looking at current trends, and guessing where they're going.

  • The goal of this talk is to give you a sense of perspective about the state of JavaScript

  • as a whole and where you sit in it.

  • So many developers work in a vacuum, not knowing whether it is best practice, a fad, or this

  • hopelessly out-of-date thing that nobody does any more.

  • I hope you leave this talk knowing the one thing you're using is a really good thing

  • with feeling that you should move away from one thing that you're using, and also excited

  • about learning one new thing that you hadn't heard about or you hadn't decided to get into

  • before.

  • But before I say all of that stuff, it's worth asking how I know?

  • Where did I get all of this information?

  • We have three main sources for the stuff I'm about to present.

  • The first is the npm registry statistics.

  • The npm registry contains amazing data about what JavaScript developers are up to and what

  • they're using, and we also did a survey.

  • Our first annual survey got 1,600 responses, and our second got 33,000 responses.

  • We have an enormous amount of information of people telling us what you're up to and

  • why you're doing it.

  • I also supplemented and double-checked our numbers using the excellent State of JavaScript

  • Survey run by the community.

  • I also have one final surprise source which is ten years of JSConf EU talk proposals!

  • Ten years!

  • My goodness.

  • That is so much work.

  • Can we have another round of applause for ten years?

  • [Applause].

  • As part of the celebration of the tenth year of JSConf EU, the organisers asked me to analyse

  • the data.

  • They gave me all of the titles and descriptions of all of the talks that have ever been submitted

  • to JSConf EU and they asked could I find something interesting in this?

  • Boy, I found interesting things in this.

  • First off, there are so many talks this year.

  • The first JSConf EU had 44 talks submitted, and this year, there were 932.

  • In 2012, someone had the bright idea that someone submit their talks at JSON which was

  • a goddamned nightmare to parse back into text and sentences, so thank you whose ever bright

  • idea that was.

  • The single most common phrase in the last ten years has been "in this talk we will ...", and

  • the second most common phrase was "learn how to", and sometimes, it was both.

  • But there's something much more interesting which is the JSConf hype meter.

  • I wanted to track how popular various technologies were, and technologies get mentioned more

  • and more often.

  • Everything is going up and to the right.

  • Instead, I measured how many talks contain a word as a percentage of all of the talks

  • submitted.

  • This is an example one before it's of Node and npm.

  • We're talking about Node last time much less than we used to but talking about npm about

  • as much as the same as we ever did.

  • All through this talk, I will weave in the JSConf data and if what we are talking about

  • lines up with the reality of what we're doing.

  • But, l Laurie, you had a huge corpus of text.

  • You could have built a markup generate colour.

  • You bet your ass I built up a markup generator.

  • Here is a machine-generate the titles based on past submissions to use for your future

  • consequences.

  • Train your next-level sequential arts.

  • This is definitely going to be done by Jenn Schiffer.

  • Talk about tools for capitalism!

  • I think it's possible that CJ has already written this talk!

  • Distributed computing in the world of CSS and JS.

  • It is possible they did this yesterday!

  • I wasn't here yet!

  • AMP for why you're being an Eyebrow.

  • Martin is going to handle this one.

  • Serverless.

  • I don't know what this means but I bet somebody could talk for 25 minutes and persuade me

  • it's true!

  • Go Node and JavaScript Crypto.

  • I don't know what it is but it's probably a bad idea, and I'm looking forward to seeing

  • these conference talks in future.

  • Before we dive in, a couple of disclaimers, some of what I'm presenting here are facts,

  • and some of what I'm presenting are opinions, and I'm trying to be as clear as possible.

  • Sometimes, you're going to see a graph that says that your favourite technology is getting

  • less popular, and what I'm asking is that you don't get mad about that.

  • Don't get mad about facts.

  • I have so many terrible opinions that you can get mad about, but try not to get mad

  • about the facts.

  • I do not have a horse in this race.

  • Apart from npm, I'm not a contributor to any of the technologies I'm discussing, I'm just

  • presenting the facts.

  • Secondly, a lot of what I'm talking about involves relative popularity of technologies,

  • and I want to make clear that, just because a technology is popular doesn't mean that

  • it is good.

  • It doesn't mean that it's the best technology.

  • I don't know what the best technology means.

  • But for technology, popularity is useful in and of itself.

  • If there are a lot of people using your technology, then there will be a lot of people find and

  • fix bugs, there will be a lot of tutorials, there will be a lot of Stack Overflow questions

  • answered for you.

  • If you work with something popular, it often makes your work easier regardless of how good

  • it really is.

  • Finally, I really love what I talk about, and I'm going to get excited towards the end

  • and swear like an absolute fucking sailor, so I have no intention of toning that down

  • in any way, so apologies in advance.

  • Who are we, JavaScript developers?

  • The answer is at this point, we're pretty much like everyone else.

  • If you look at our demographics, the same age distribution, same instrument profile,

  • we live in all the same countries as all of the other software developers and the reason

  • for that is because we nearly are all software developers.

  • We are 11 million developers now writing JavaScript every day.

  • And those 11 million developers are using more open-source software than any other language

  • community.

  • The npm registry is now the largest repository of open source of any kind, by any measure,

  • by number of modules, by lines of code, number of users - what are you want to pick.

  • It's more than twice as big as the next registry.

  • You could fold all the other registries into our registry if you wanted.

  • Does having a big registry of open source software translate to activity?

  • On GitHub, JavaScript is the biggest repository by numbers of line of code, and it has been

  • in seven years in a row.

  • In stack overflow's huge developer survey of 80,000 people, JavaScript was the most

  • popular language with 68 per cent of all developers saying they write JavaScript at least some

  • of the time.

  • Of course, you're all at a JavaScript conference, so that you knew that JavaScript was popular

  • already, but here is the truth: JavaScript is the most popular programming language in

  • the world right now, and there are more developers than ever before, so JavaScript is really

  • the most popular programming language there has ever been.

  • And as JavaScript continues to grow, the JavaScript community is changing.

  • One thing we noticed that has changed between our survey in 2018 and the last one we did,

  • is that JavaScript developers are getting more experienced.

  • They've been writing JavaScript for longer.

  • We especially noticed this with npm itself.

  • A year ago, half of our npm users were new, which is to say they had been using npm for

  • less than two years, and this year, only about 36 per cent of people are.

  • Around about 2014, and 2015, there was a massive spike in the number of npm users - around

  • about that time, it's when JavaScript - existing JavaScript developers tuned into npm and the

  • existing pool of JavaScript developers all sort of adopted npm en masse.

  • But, today, the number of new npm users and the number of new JavaScript users, they look

  • about the same, because, basically, anybody who learns JavaScript in 2019 is learning

  • npm at the same time.

  • So now believe that about 99 per cent of JavaScript developers are using npm, and that's part

  • of why npm has so much information about what JavaScript developers are up to at the.

  • This ever-growing pool of increasingly experienced JavaScript developers means that we've also

  • seen a shift?

  • In what JavaScript developers care about.

  • We knew from analysing last year's data that more experienced developers care more about

  • best practices.

  • They do more testing, they use more linters and bundlers, they care more about security,

  • and so now the whole community is getting more experienced, and so everybody is caring

  • more about those sorts of things.

  • Since last year's survey, the number of people who said they were concerned about the security

  • of the open-source modules that they use, has increased.

  • In the last two years, npm has added two-parking auth to protect publishers from account theft