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  • (bright upbeat music)

  • - Vince Del Monte now this is not

  • just a social media influencer,

  • he's really the trainer for trainer,

  • right? - Yap.

  • Like they are the fitness expert for fitness expert.

  • So Vince, maybe take us back in the beginning a little bit,

  • like from days back then,

  • like how did you get into business,

  • and how did you get into what you do today?

  • - Yeah, sure well,

  • I knew nothing about business way back in the day.

  • I was nicknamed skinny Vinnie.

  • I was a long distance runner,

  • I was raised in a runners family.

  • - Yes. - Went to school,

  • and I got a degree in Exercise Science

  • in our university would call it kinesiology,

  • and I was destined to be a high school physique teacher.

  • - [Dan] Oh, wow.

  • - Yeah, that's what I was meant to do because, you know,

  • summers off and hey, you're helping kids

  • and you're sounding a cool I'll be a physique teacher,

  • and while I was going to school,

  • I was also enamored by these dudes I was living with

  • who were buffed and super muscular,

  • remember, I was skinny Vinnie.

  • - [Dan] Yes.

  • - And I was really always trying to figure out my identity,

  • and thank goodness I had running.

  • I was a very competitive long distance runner,

  • I was very good at it.

  • I found my identity in it,

  • I've been represented Canada in triathlon

  • and went to the World Championships.

  • And that's kinda how I got through university

  • and through high school, and I managed the nicknames.

  • But I always had this curiosity with,

  • if I transferred 60 to 100 miles a week of running

  • into the gym.

  • - What would that look like?

  • - Yeah, could I get big?

  • It was just a curiosity, there was not like,

  • can I monetize this?

  • Can I write an E-book?

  • Can I make more money?

  • - Just doing it for your own like improvement,

  • right? - That was.

  • - Got it. - Just to get the girls

  • at the front desk and maybe take a second look,

  • that was it. - Yes.

  • - So um, I get into the workforce

  • after spending $50,000 on a university education

  • and working for $10 an hour at the age of 22

  • at a local YMCA,

  • five minutes from my house where my dad works.

  • So and one of the first things my dad asked me

  • after he sees me in the gym every day,

  • helping other gentlemen, do the back extension,

  • the same machine, he uses he's,

  • "Are you gonna be a personal trainer when you're 35?"

  • And I thought, he doesn't believe in this path.

  • And I quickly realized

  • that it wasn't his job to believe in me

  • because nobody has ever gone down this path,

  • there was no playbook for being a personal trainer--

  • - At that time did he feel like that's not a real career?

  • - Yeah. - It's almost like,

  • it's just a hobby that you do, right?

  • - And do how you make it 10 bucks an hour

  • after a $50,000 university education?

  • You know, I mean, anyone on the other side would be,

  • "How do you make that calculation?"

  • So I quickly realized that I needed to make him believe

  • and that's when I started getting introduced

  • to books on wealth creation, one specifically,

  • "The Cashflow Quadrant" by Robert Kiyosaki,

  • and I quickly realized

  • that I was hitting a ceiling working at the gym.

  • And my first inclination was asked for a raise.

  • So I asked my boss for a raise, and she said,

  • "Let me talk to the boss."

  • They came back to me the next day and they said,

  • "Yes, we can give you a raise,

  • "in one year from now, we can give you a $1 raise."

  • From 10 to $11 an hour, and that's when I discovered

  • the definition of job, Just Over Broke.

  • And that's when I realized

  • it wasn't my boss's job to make me rich,

  • but to provide me a paycheck, I was capped.

  • And I went to a gym nearby that was known for sales,

  • very aggressive, it was always full.

  • And I got my first introduction to selling,

  • which is something like--

  • - You sell your gym membership?

  • - Gym memberships, and then quickly

  • so I could make more selling personal training,

  • and selling 144 sessions and getting a 10 to 20% commission,

  • And I quickly saw--

  • - You do high-ticket sales?

  • - Literally. - That's like

  • high-ticket closing right there.

  • - I was doing high-ticket closing at the age of 22.

  • - What was the package and what was the amount?

  • - So my biggest package was 44 sorry, 144 sessions.

  • - For how much? - At you get a reduction

  • on that if they paid in full for $40.

  • And I still remember my biggest package was selling

  • a husband and a wife for the year paid in full,

  • and it just blew my mind. - How much was that?

  • - Sounds around six, 7,000 dollars,

  • but then I made 20% on that.

  • - That's like, yeah.

  • - Yeah, and I quickly realized

  • that was my first introduction

  • that I could write my own paycheck.

  • And I was like, wow, this is my opportunity

  • to figure out how to make a name for myself

  • and how to master this skill of selling

  • and communicating persuasion, and following up with people

  • and handling rejection.

  • I had no idea that I was building

  • what we would call today entrepreneur muscles.

  • And I didn't know I was building this emotional resilience,

  • that has served me to this day,

  • but that's where it all started.

  • That's where like my birth into the world of sales

  • and I became the guy in the gym,

  • where everybody would just keep showing up at the office

  • with coffee, and they just put it outside the door

  • and they just want me to stay in the office

  • because it's my job to sell

  • the training. - Sell the training, yeah.

  • - And I was writing everybody's paychecks,

  • not literally but--

  • - But you created, you're the Rainmaker,

  • you're the one that's generating revenue.

  • - And I was like, I'm running the show.

  • I'm like, Well, I brought this one department

  • from two personal trainers to 15 personal trainers

  • because I knew how to sell. - Yes.

  • Which is the number one skill you need

  • by the way to be successful in business.

  • - Yeah, - And the ability

  • to sell and close.

  • - The next thing I know my boss is offering me 20%

  • I started down at 10%, and when I sold over 20,000,

  • I get 20% on that instead of

  • I think 5% as a scale structure, which was really smart

  • and then you remove my base,

  • and I just work on pure commission and I mean,

  • on my mid 20s I was-- - You were closing.

  • - Yeah, I was closing,

  • I was a high ticket closer my mid 20s.

  • And I loved it, but it was also a roller coaster.

  • It was a fricking roller.

  • It was days I was like, this is brutal,

  • people left the office because I got things got awkward,

  • I didn't know what I was doing half the time,

  • but I was persistent.

  • And it was probably man oh man, I learned more

  • from those years selling in the gym

  • than I did four years combined the university.

  • - What are some of the things that you maybe

  • one or two key lessons you've learned during

  • that period of time that helps you close a lot of sales?

  • - People are not buying a product,

  • and they're not buying an outcome.

  • When you buy Personal Training,

  • you walk in overweight, you walk out overweight.

  • People are buying feelings.

  • - Yeah, emotions.

  • - And the more you make someone feel

  • the more you get someone to buy.

  • - I like it.