Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Hello Everybody!

  • Come with me and my readers

  • Shawn, Lucy, Cora, Andrew, and another Andrew

  • I'm going to show you how to shop in a Korean grocery store

  • and choose the best of the best.

  • Let's look for Korean noodles, powders, grains, beans, and seaweed.

  • There are many kinds of noodles.

  • This are all wheat noodles.

  • So I'm using this really thin noodles.

  • It's called somyeon.

  • So I use this for all kinds of things: noodle soup, also spicy mixed noodles.

  • I always have this at home.

  • In my pantry.

  • You guys love cold noodles, in Korean: "naengmyeon."

  • That's my favorite noodle soup, naengmyeon.

  • Noodles are made with buckwheat and wheat.

  • And this is very chewy.

  • And sometimes they come with a package inside, of seasoning paste.

  • Or seasoning powder.

  • You can make broth with this powder package, and then eat it.

  • There are directions on how to make it

  • And also my website, I have a really good recipe, you can find.

  • This is my favorite brand.

  • This mul-naengmyeon has, you can feel, a liquid package inside, not powder

  • So easily you can mix with water.

  • Not only water, but add pear juice or apple juice.

  • Really tasty.

  • This is sweet potato starch noodles.

  • Dangmyeon. It's called dangmyeon

  • See? Dangmyeon.

  • All these noodles are made with sweet potato starch

  • People also call these "glass noodles"

  • When you make japcahe, stir fried noodles with vegetables and meat

  • Really tasty.

  • And also I make yachae hotteok

  • Hotteok filled with some vegetables and noodles

  • I use these noodles.

  • You can buy any brand.

  • This section is powders.

  • I always use potato starch.

  • It says "potato starch," easily you can find.

  • This is mung bean.

  • Mung bean jelly.

  • Mung bean starch.

  • You can see: "Mung bean starch"

  • When you go to a Korean restaurant, sometimes you see

  • square shaped jelly.

  • You don't know what is made with

  • But you buy one package, and you can make a huge amount.

  • Whenever I make rice cake, or sweet chewy rice cake, I use this.

  • Because easy and very convenient.

  • Mochiko.

  • Yeotgireum-garu. Yeotgireum is barley malt.

  • Barley malt powder.

  • So when I make gochujang, I use this.

  • When I make rice punch called sikhye, I need this.

  • "Malt powder." You can see.

  • This is bean powder, soybean powder.

  • There are two types: raw soybean powder, and toasted soybean powder.

  • Toasted. Toasted on is nutty.

  • Usually when I make some injeolmi, Korean rice cake

  • coated with some nutty soybean powder

  • This is has to be toasted.

  • Sometimes my readers ask me: "Which one do I have to use?"

  • And this is roasted soybean powder.

  • You can see the difference.

  • Canned food.

  • I just use this mackerel pike.

  • Oops! Mackerel pike

  • I use this in kimchi-jjigae.

  • When I make kimchi stew, instead of using pork,

  • I sometimes use this

  • Or mackerel. Mackerel, we use this.

  • And also, what I use is golbaengi.

  • It's a kind of whelk, a kind of sea snail.

  • Really delicious and chewy and sweet, it's already cooked.

  • You can open it and eat it.

  • But sliced and mixed with noodles and spicy paste

  • It's Koreans' favorite dish.

  • Golbaengi-muchim

  • "Gol-baeng-i"

  • Next, when I posted my recipe for curry rice

  • some of my Indian readers, they gave me a hard time

  • "Maangchi, I though that you were going to mix your own curry powder!"

  • No, not like that.

  • In Korea, there is only one product

  • it's curry, already packaged.

  • So this is Ottogi curry, my favorite.

  • Mild, hot, medium

  • Stir fry some vegetables and meat

  • and then later you mix this with water

  • and then pour this and stir together

  • and then make nice yellow, beautiful sauce, and you pour this on rice

  • Steamy rice, and then eat

  • Really tasty, ka-re rice.

  • You can make ka-re rice with this.

  • When I make multigrain rice I just pick up a few of these

  • and then I make it at home.

  • I use hyeonmi-chapssal, brown sweet rice

  • Sweet rice is glutinous rice

  • So brown sweet rice.

  • And also bori - barley.

  • Barley is here, you can find.

  • If you don't like glutinous rice

  • too sticky, then you can use just brown rice.

  • Some people ask me: "Oh Maangchi, how can you make your purple multigrain rice?"

  • Actually, it's black rice.

  • Here, black rice.

  • Don't use too much. Just add one tablespoon for one cup of white rice

  • And then color will change to a really beautiful purple color.

  • When the rice is done.

  • Good nutrients, it has.

  • Ok, and next, this is red beans.

  • Adzuki beans.

  • You know, I make porridge with these

  • I make some rice cake with these

  • You can find easily in a Korean grocery store.

  • I'm talking off, a little hot.

  • These are soybeans, dried soybeans.

  • Make meju, Korean doenjang,

  • Korean fermented bean paste, you gotta use.

  • Soybeans are very important in Korean cuisine.

  • And these are mung beans.

  • Green and small, and you can sprout very easily at home.

  • How to sprout mung beans, check out my website

  • Very easy and you will have a really really lot of fun.

  • Whole mung beans.

  • When I make bindaetteok, mung bean pancakes

  • I use these. Very easy! This is also mung beans

  • but already hulled. The skins are gone, so color is a very beautiful yellow.

  • So I just soak these with glutinous rice and then grind.

  • And then just mix with meat and vegetables and then pan fry

  • That's delicious, delicious bindaetteok you can make.

  • You know the Korean seaweed paper?

  • I don't like that name "weed" because such a delicious sea vegetable!

  • Somebody should change the name but everybody calls this seaweed

  • So what else can I do? I gotta follow them, right?

  • So anyway, this is seaweed paper.

  • In Korean, "gim."

  • You can see: "gimbap-young guun-gim"

  • Roasted seaweed, roasted seaweed.

  • This is for when you make gimbap, seaweed rice rolls, you can use this.

  • Or, this is not roasted.

  • Just dried seaweed paper.

  • You can make gimbap with this, too.

  • You just toast slightly.

  • And also this kind of gim is packed

  • so already oiled and salted.

  • So this is very crunchy and people call these seaweed chips.

  • You can just take it out and eat it.

  • I'm sure that you guys know this.

  • When you make triangle gimbap

  • You can use this one easily.

  • You can open it and there are directions inside

  • and you follow the directions and you can make this.

  • I have a recipe on my website if you want to make.

  • So this gim, usually I prefer not toasted one.

  • Untoasted, raw gim, dried gim

  • So I use this kind of gim.

  • Or sometimes when you make rice cake soup

  • you just toast, make it crunchy and crispy, crush this and then put this on top

  • of you rice cake soup, and the flavor is really enhanced.

  • Miyeok is very important in Korean cuisine.

  • You know why?

  • Everybody's birthday you gotta make this soup.

  • Miyeok soup. Miyeok-guk.

  • So miyeok-guk is kind of makes Koreans emotional.

  • In Korea, when a woman is having a baby

  • For one month you need to take a rest at home and keep eating miyeok-guk.

  • See? Miyeok.

  • I can open this.

  • [laughs]

  • I use my teeth so my readers are laughing.

  • No time to find scissors!

  • See? Look at that.

  • So easily breakable, like this. Right?