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  • So more on this later but for now

  • Beef Wellington

  • Hey guys, salud! This is Alex.

  • So today

  • I want to try improve Gordon Ramsay's

  • Signature Dish - Beef Wellington.

  • Right off the bat,

  • I want to clarify something,

  • I'm not saying that my version will be tastier than Gordon's obviously.

  • He's a Michelin star chef, he has many restaurants

  • so much more experience than I do,

  • but I want my method

  • to be more systematic. I want my version to be foolproof.

  • I want it to be easier to understand

  • and I also want break down

  • everything that's happening deep inside.

  • Let's have a closer look at his recipe

  • - the challenges that I see.

  • english mustard

  • mushrooms

  • look, how wet they are

  • The Beef Wellington is a fully enclosed dish

  • which means that

  • plenty of steam will be generated inside

  • so if you don't want to get a soggy pastry,

  • you need to find ways around it.

  • That's the first challenge.

  • twist it nice and tight

  • I got no doubt that this guy is using

  • homemade puff pastry and for a reason.

  • Homemade puff pastry

  • will bring this dish to the next level.

  • This dish is not about beef only -

  • it is about beef and pastry --

  • this is the second challenge.

  • he is an artist

  • The third challenge is definitely to cook

  • the meat right.

  • When Gordon is baking the whole Beef Wellington

  • he's basically performing two actions at the same time -

  • baking the puff but also cooking the meat to the

  • right done-ness. And trust me

  • this is not an easy part.

  • You can't touch it and you can't

  • see what's happening inside.

  • So yes - this is

  • a complicated dish but NO it's not impossible

  • to make. Especially if we take it step-by-step.

  • And the first step is to get the right meat.

  • salud

  • So at my butcher I bought a Chateaubriand

  • which is the central part

  • of a beef tenderloin.

  • Mine weighs - I would say - about a kilo but

  • the most important part is that it has

  • a consistent thickness

  • all the way through.

  • I also asked my butcher

  • to do two things for me - first off

  • to get rid of the excess fat

  • and then to teach me that butcher technique

  • when you can tie a roast

  • using only one piece of string.

  • I, I think I got it.

  • Okay, guys we got everything we need.

  • Let's head back to 'Le Studio'.

  • Right ! Let me show you how it works.

  • So that beef fillet is going to stay in there for

  • about 30 minutes - 1 hour.

  • I'll come back on this later,

  • but for the moment let's take a

  • closer look at what makes a Beef Wellington.

  • the very structure of that dish.

  • At the very core - you have Beef.

  • Then mustard - mushroom duxelle

  • parma ham - crepe

  • Puff pastry.

  • Everything is gravitating around the fillet of beef.

  • That's why I call this dish the

  • "Solar System of the Pate en Croute Galaxy"

  • No no - it does make sense.

  • I know it's weird but it does make sense.

  • Beef - there's a lot of water there

  • that is basically going to steam.

  • And the layers around it - it could be 'flavoring agent'

  • 'water barrier', or 'absorbers'

  • or 'texture bring-ers.'

  • Puff pastry - mainly here for the crispiness but that's

  • also going to create the barrier.

  • The crepe

  • an 'asborber'.

  • Parma ham -

  • which is basically a flavor inducer.

  • Mushroom duxelle -

  • which is definitely bringing some bold

  • beef matching flavors.

  • But also bringing another problem

  • it's full of moisture.

  • The mustard - another flavor bringer.

  • And the beautiful, almighty super tender Beef.

  • That's basically it for the

  • structure of this dish.

  • so

  • I suggest we get to work.

  • Cause there's plenty to do.

  • Right - so a quick comment about searing the meat.

  • I believe it's important from a flavor

  • point-of-view.

  • From a texture point-of-view -- it's useless.

  • The Beef Wellington needs a full enclosure

  • there is plenty of steam inside and there is no way

  • that anything is going to stay crispy -- inside at least.

  • now I'm going to sous-vide this fillet of beef for about

  • 2.5 hours at 50 degrees Celsius

  • that's 122 degrees Fahrenheit.

  • Let me compare Gordon's meat

  • with my own meat by

  • doing a few drawings on the board.

  • So on the vertical axis you've got the inner

  • temperature of the meat -- on the horizontal axis

  • you've got the time passing by.

  • Gordon starts with the meat at room temperature.

  • He sears it and then later on he bakes it.

  • Which slowly increases the inner temperature of

  • the meat until Gordon decides that

  • it's perfectly done.

  • Very much relying on Gordon's skills.

  • And it makes a lot of sense -- this guy has cooked 100

  • Beef Wellington in the past so

  • this is just fine for Gordon.

  • now, My method is different.

  • I sear a very cold meat - so the inside

  • remains raw.

  • Then, I cook it sous-vide at 50 Celsius

  • or 122 Fahrenheit.

  • Remember that with sous-vide there is no under

  • or over cooking, whatsoever.

  • I then quickly chill this perfectly cooked meat to

  • fridge temperature.

  • Now the most important

  • difference with Gordon's method is

  • this diagonal line -- the baking.

  • You see, in Gordon's method there is only one moment

  • and one moment only - where meat

  • and pastry are perfectly cooked at the same time.

  • Since you can't see the meat inside

  • you need a lot of chef experience

  • to guess that moment right.

  • Now in my method

  • I'm taking beef out of the equation during baking.

  • The meat is already cooked

  • and since it's cold and protected with all these outer

  • layers, baking it won't cook it.

  • It's just going to warm it up.

  • The only thing you need to focus on

  • is baking the puff right.

  • To the color you like.

  • Since you can see it in the oven

  • it's an easy job.

  • And I guess that's the beauty of this method

  • you don't have to guess, you just know.

  • From an amateur point-of-view, it's such a relief.

  • Especially since I've been working so hard

  • and that piece of beef is so expensive.

  • The fillet of beef has been cooking in

  • for about 2.5 hours.

  • It's going to be beautiful -- I can see that.

  • So in the fridge overnigt.

  • I should just get rid of all the little tasks

  • starting with the Mushroom Duxelle.

  • I mean, who am I to challenge the tradition, anyway?

  • Duxelle has to be done by hand.

  • Thyme, mushrooms, shallots