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  • Hey guys, salute, it's Alex

  • So welcome to this second episode of the sourdough bread. Obviously the first episode was about how to make our own

  • sourdough starter, but this episode right here is about flour.

  • Number one key ingredient when you make

  • sourdough breadyou will be so much more in control of how you bake after this episode. I know it.

  • We are never going to make bread. Never! There's no point in doing this. This is a f***. What? Just sit back relax,

  • and don't be so sour.

  • Wheat. In short, there are two main categories of wheat in the world. You've got the

  • Common Wheat: Triticum Aestivum, and you've got Durum Wheat which is known as Triticum Durum.

  • They used Latin names just to sound a bit more legit, but not only for that. It's also very

  • efficient to clear out any confusions and any

  • misunderstanding which are so widely spread onlineon blogs,

  • on commentseverywhere. That messy situation is mainly due to the lack of a systematic and global

  • flour classification system. For example, in France and in Italy, Common Wheat is called Soft Wheat and

  • Durum Wheat is called Hard Wheat, because Duram, basically means hard in latin. Okay enough with Latin.

  • But in the US Hard Wheat usually means

  • high-protein,

  • Common Wheat. Whereas Soft Wheat usually means low protein

  • Common Wheat. You see the problem? So from now on we'll just consider 'Common Wheat' as bread's mostly

  • made out of this category. Now, I say we take a look at the kernel of wheat or the wheat berry.

  • There are three main parts. On the outside

  • you've got the bran which is full of minerals and fiber.

  • The main part inside is called the endosperm. Last time he says f*** now he says s****.

  • What's the next one? Endosperm it's rich in starch some carbs and

  • protein. Finally you've got the germ, this small part right here,

  • which is rich in vitamins and good fats, so please keep this all

  • sketch all in mind because it's going to

  • be useful afterwards

  • Wheat grains or wheat berries are then ground into

  • flour using a mill.

  • I shouldn't do that.

  • Yes, right, of course, you can't make a decent, a proper

  • loaf of bread with the wrong flour. You've got to pick the right flour

  • that suits your baker's need. What you need to know about flour is that they are classified and measured

  • mainly using two

  • numbers. The first one is the 'ash content' and the second one is the 'protein content'.

  • Let's have a closer look. The ash content measures the amount of

  • minerals remaining in the flour after

  • milling the wheat berries, as minerals are mostly is on the outside of the wheat berry, the higher the ash content

  • the more bran and the more outer layers, you will get in your flour. It goes from lower than 0.5

  • percent for white and pure and more refined flourcake and pastry flour. Then here,

  • here, you have all-purpose white flour.

  • Then you've got bread flour which is somewhere around here.

  • Then you've got the artisan bread flour. Then you've got the light whole wheat and finally you've got dark whole wheat.

  • From a Baker's point of view I would say the higher the ash content the more

  • complex flavors you will get, but also the more water you will need.

  • Your best option is having to mix bread flour with a bit of whole wheat in order to get the best of both worlds.

  • Also if you consider making a sourdough starter, you should always be using an organic

  • whole wheat flour or at least

  • 0.8 or

  • 1.1 ash content flour. You want as many

  • nutrients, as many things inside your flour as possible to maximize your chances to get

  • wild yeast and good bacteria.

  • So before we move on I want to thank you guys out there supporting me financially on my Patreon page,

  • and I really, really enjoy that. It does make a difference. If you want to help, too

  • then click the link at the end of the video and support my work.

  • Now is that cool if we just step out of my oven? I mean, I like the place. It's cozy and all

  • but it doesn't look super safe.

  • Next the protein content.

  • It's very important for bakers. In flour you can find many, many

  • proteins and some of them known as a Gliadin and Glutenin,

  • when they are

  • hydrated and

  • neaded, they can produce

  • gluten.

  • Do you all know about glutens or should I....ah I already know the answer to that question.

  • Gluten is like a strong and elastic matrix that holds the air inside the dough when it's fermenting and so producing gas.

  • ...And simply put, the higher

  • protein content in your flour the more gluten you get in your dough at the end. So in terms of value, protein

  • content goes from less than 7% all the way up to more than

  • 15%. This is a low protein content, which is perfect for

  • cookies for short pastries, you know, when you want to get that

  • crumbly texture and this high protein content is great when you want to make bread, of course,

  • but also when you want to make pizza. When you want that extra

  • chewy texture. The flour I use to make bread usually stands right here.

  • If protein content gives you a clear indication of how much gluten you can expect at the end,

  • it doesn't say anything about its quality.

  • The strength of flour is in my opinion a way better indication of a glutens' quality,

  • and quantity at the same time. It can be very

  • accurately measured with a number called the 'w index', however, it's never mentioned on the package, so a.....

  • See if you can find the word 'strong' on a flour, and it means that it has a higher

  • W index so the dough might be more extensible, more elastic at the end, and of course, yes,

  • whenever I can, I use strong flour to bake bread.

  • And the last thing I want to add is that flour can sometimes be 'treated'.

  • Industy will often use the term 'bleached' flour.

  • They are not exactly using bleach, they could, but in fact they are using, you know, some

  • chemical agent to artificially age and whiten the flour,

  • so I never go for 'bleached' flour. I go for the most

  • natural possible and even more when I do my sourdough starter, I go for organic.

  • So guy's that's it.

  • I hope you enjoyed this second episode of the sourdough bread

  • series. If you liked this video give it a 'like', 'thumbs up' and share that over your social media.

  • You know the deal: '#Spread It Like Butter' also if you have a few comments about flour

  • maybe your favorite flour. If you have any other questions, about what I said in the video,

  • please let me know in the comments and let's people click 'subscribe' because I make new videos every week.

  • And if it's always, always about food, it's also about getting

  • smarter in the kitchen. Okay, until nextbye, bye. Salute.

Hey guys, salute, it's Alex

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B1 wheat flour bread content protein sourdough

Which Flour for Baking Bread ? Sourdough Bread Series

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/03/25
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