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  • "Robin, come in." "Robin here." Hi. James, from EngVid. Sorry. Reading "Batman: Black

  • and White". I almost wanted to say "Blackman: Black and White", but I didn't. Hi. So what

  • am I doing today besides joking with you? Look, I want to teach a lesson today -- and

  • already, the naysayers -- the "naysayers" are the people who say "no" before you finish.

  • So you teachers out there that watch these lessons, I know you'll go, "Oh, well this

  • rule isn't right because --." This isn't about that. I'm telling you now there are lessons

  • on the video -- and actually on EngVid -- that go into greater detail and explain very well

  • what I'm about to teach. This lesson is very specific. It's a quick way and a short way

  • for you to remember some grammar problems which are very common among many students.

  • If you teach English, you know exactly what I mean. If you're a student, you know what

  • I mean. And if you're somebody who is studying English on your own, when people look at you

  • strangely, and then they explain to you, you know what I mean.

  • So this is JamesESL's 80 percent rules. Three quick rules for grammar. And the 80 percent

  • -- who could possibility forget the best guy in the world? Because he's going to be our

  • percent sign today. Mr. E! Okay. Mr. E is the percent sign. So it's our 80 percent rules.

  • What do I mean by that? There are many exceptions to everything I'm going to tell you. I'm saying

  • this up front so you don't get confused later on. But you will be correct 80 percent of

  • the time without thinking if you master these rules. And the exceptions -- go to the other

  • lessons on the site, and there's a lesson for each one of these. I'm telling you. I

  • did this because it's easier for you to read, write, and do well when you know these rules,

  • okay? So let's start with No. 1. Very often, students

  • say, "I say him." And I go, "What?" "I say him, 'I go home, now.'" I go, "What?" "I say

  • him." You can't "say" him. Remember: "Say" by itself means "single". S equals "single",

  • right? "Single" means "one". "I say all the time." "He said to me." Right? Say and said,

  • past form of "say". It's for "one". One person is speaking. So when you just say "say" by

  • itself, think "single". And you'll notice I've got S and S. But then you say, "James,

  • I want to say -- I want to say two people or more. I say him all the time." Okay. Okay.

  • I'll help you. This is the James 80 percent rule. Say "to" him. "What?" Say "to" him.

  • "To" indicates a subject and an object -- a person is speaking to another person. "What

  • did you say to him?" "Oh!" See? Right? You add the magic "to", and now, you can talk

  • to more than one person and address it. "What did he say to him?" Got it? But if you say

  • something, "I say", "he says", "they said" -- single "say". If you want to add an object

  • or a person you're referring to, then we say "say to". And the "to" gives you the idea

  • of two or more. You like that? I got more. Okay. I don't even like saying "to". It's

  • so five-letterish. Why don't we just stick with four letters? "Tell". Think T in "tell"

  • means "two". You know how you say "say to", two words? You can combine that and just say

  • "tell". "I told" -- tell and told. So we'll put "told" here because it's the same thing,

  • really. Past tense, just like "said" is here, right? "I told him." Right? Subject and object.

  • "What did he tell you?" Subject and object. T stands for "two". So whenever you see "say"

  • or "tell", if you have "say" and "to" -- "to" means "two", right? You like that? And "tell"

  • -- T means "two". You keep getting this T thing, and you know it's "two" -- an object

  • and a subject is speaking to an object. Quick and easy. Dirty, clean -- I don't care. It's

  • yours. All right? You like that? I got more. See this sleeve? Are you looking up the sleeve?

  • Boom. Back to the board. Okay. No. 2: third person

  • singular. "Hablar -- hablar en español." You know, when you say "you", you use S. "Hablas",

  • "tienes" -- that's all the Spanish I know. You watched my other video where I say "bro"?

  • See? I told you to look for ten. Here's one video where you've got "bro", okay? Try and

  • find nine more. Anyway. So you think third person, like "work". Well, "it" means "one".

  • "He" means "one". "She" means "one". S stands for "single". We're going to go back up here

  • again. S stands for "single". I told you, it's James' 80 percent rule. One word rules

  • them all. Or as my friends who like The Hobbit say, "And one ring shall control them all.

  • The lesser S means 'single' forevermore. Forevermore. Forevermore." That means "from now on", okay?

  • So you see S; you know this is a "single" thing. So it's got to be a "he", a "she",

  • or an "it". Not a "them". Not a "they". That's plural. There's no P in this. So "it works."

  • "She works". "I works?" No. Only for the third person singular, okay? And to help my Spanish

  • friends out there -- mis amigos and amigas! Okay. Think second person. The "you". It's

  • the same thing. Add an S. Okay? When I learn other languages -- Ruski or Urdu -- I will

  • teach you other rules, okay? I'm working on it. One lesson at a time. So S means "single",

  • just like we had up here. All right? So we use it for our single "he", "she", "it". Add

  • S; "It work?" No. "It works." "She works." "He works." I am special. So I have "am".

  • You like that? You should. Third one. "No, Teacher. This no work for

  • me. This is very difficult." I'm trying to think. "I not a good boy. No." Yeah. You know

  • you say this. You know you do. You know you do. We've worked on this. So I'm going to

  • work on something: the "no" words. Now, many languages have one word "no". "No hablar con

  • tú!" Yeah. I'm taking Spanish. Okay. "Non parler." All right. French, Spanish, you have

  • "no". In English, we have this crazy thing -- or we have two words which mean "no". Sorry

  • about that. Once again, it's the 80 percent rule. So all you guys getting up and going,

  • "Oh, James, adjectives, and --." I know. But we're going to keep it simple because it's

  • quick when you have time -- sorry, when you don't have time to think. You need something

  • you can rely on. Here we go. See the word "no"? See the word "noun"? No noun, noun no,

  • no, no, no noun, no, no, no. No. "No money." "No one." "No food." No, no. Okay? It's a

  • product that they sell called a "No No" that gets rid of hair. That's another story. Okay.

  • But "no" goes with nouns. "No one came yesterday." "No person on the planet likes English" except

  • me and Mr. E and you because you're studying. "Not" is usually for verbs. Notice the T on

  • the end of this means "tense", "verb tense". "Not going", "not working", right? Now, there

  • are other little rules, and I did say to you: Go through EngVid, and you'll find it because

  • there is a rule that actually is not quite the same as this. All right? But master this

  • first because the reason I'm teaching this lesson, if you understand the very basic things,

  • when you study the other lessons, you'll find that it's easy to understand them because

  • you have the basics down. This is the core, what we say, "the root". Okay? The start.

  • And from there, you get the little exceptions here and there.

  • So this is JamesESL teaching you a quick grammar lesson with three -- oh, gosh! You don't know

  • -- very common mistakes. Okay. Mr. E and I are going to get out of here. He's helping

  • with the 80 percent rule thing. So remember: "say" -- "say to". "Say to" equals "two".

  • "Tell" -- T equals "two". Third person singular -- S on the end of the verb means "he", "she"

  • or "it". "No" is for nouns. "Not" is for verb tense -- T for "tense". You're good to go.

  • All right? Listen. It's been a pleasure once again. Please

  • go to www.engvid.com, "eng" as in "English" and "vid" as in "video", where you can see

  • me and Mr. E and do the test. Don't forget to hit "like". Chao.

"Robin, come in." "Robin here." Hi. James, from EngVid. Sorry. Reading "Batman: Black

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A2 percent single tense rule object noun

3 Quick Grammar Fixes

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    Sam Yau posted on 2014/02/08
Video vocabulary