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  • If there was a burger jet, I it would be Kenji Lopez.

  • Halt.

  • The award winning author and Internet food legend has conducted hundreds of breakthrough experiments on his influential blawg, the Burger Lab.

  • Today, Brana missions debunks some of the most prevailing burger Miss around and to learn some eye opening techniques that will lead to a better for delicious burger.

  • My entire career I've been taught certain things right, right, right, right.

  • And then I read your block and you just see the complete opposite.

  • Every once in a while, you find me like this thing that everybody's doing all the time.

  • Like actually, if you actually tested side by side, it turns out that it's not the best right thing.

  • That's what makes you you need to take a scientific approach and then you document it.

  • So it's kind of like for all of the haters out there, these are my notes.

  • You just go against the grain and like you and you prove it right.

  • Always want to cut against the grain today what we're gonna make, actually, hopefully different from any other burger done on the show before I call it the best burger for a single person because you can literally only make one at a time.

  • It doesn't work.

  • You try to make too many men in the process.

  • I think we're gonna try and debunk a few burger myths, things, things people say you always have to do.

  • And there's a time will explain why you shouldn't Shouldn't.

  • This is like a Jed I Yoda moment.

  • Get the right on your back here.

  • You'll hear a lot of people say is that Chuck, which comes from the shoulder of the steering, is the best meat for burgers.

  • Yeah, Chuck is a very good sort of all in one meat, it makes it easy like it has.

  • Chuck is one of these muscles that works hard throughout throughout this tears life.

  • It has a lot of good marbling, a lot of fat, lot of flavor development.

  • But if you think of of a burger is like a nice blended whiskey or an ice blended wine, you know you want to take different elements on and make sure that the flavors between them are balanced.

  • Azi, blend them.

  • What we got here is brisket.

  • What we got over here is sirloin, and then right here.

  • We got short rib.

  • So let's taste some of these burger varietals.

  • I say we start with Chuck, which is the one that you're probably most used to eating.

  • It's gonna have that sort of balance.

  • And that is like, pretty classic burger.

  • Well, all right, let's move on to the short route here.

  • There's a lot of richness, but not not too much depth, You know, it's like it feels like all like, it's a very rich Yeah, you feel it's, like, sort of like like medium.

  • You know, it's just like base one thing, but there's nothing much above it out.

  • All right, let's move on to the brisket.

  • You get, like, a sort of like a sour nous tue it out.

  • People described, I think is like serum flavor.

  • Like look minerally.

  • Yeah.

  • Now let's taste some top sirloin here.

  • Yeah, you can't just do a burger like that.

  • No drying.

  • So we're brisket, I think has a sort of crumbly texture.

  • Sirloin binds better stays, stays more tender as a client feel.

  • Yeah.

  • Yeah.

  • So what I would I like to do is I like to combine, um, about 50% sirloin just to have that sort of like black blank canvas.

  • And the tenderness along with about 25% brisket, 25% short rib makes so much sense.

  • We're using relatively cheap cuts of meat, right?

  • You know, we're not using wax burger.

  • Yeah, it's a burger Burger.

  • Should be.

  • It's it's crap beef.

  • Most democratic food in the world.

  • It's gonna cue this up.

  • Nice intervention.

  • Have chunks.

  • So what we're doing is we're cutting into cubes and we're tossing all the cubes together into a bowl so that when we grind them, you know, everything sort of evenly mixed together.

  • One thing you might be asking is, when should we put the salt?

  • You need assault.

  • You need good.

  • Been debated for the longest time.

  • It is.

  • It's a big take someone in the fifties or sixties like this is the point.

  • You salt it exactly.

  • So a lot of people will tell you put salt in right now.

  • I think this is a big mistake.

  • I have to burger Patties.

  • One of them was made with beef that was salted okay.

  • And the other one was made with beef.

  • That was unsalted quick little experiment for that.

  • I think we should probably head outside.

  • I have your two burger Patties identical, except for the fact that in one of them to salt was mixed into the meat.

  • And in the other one, the salt is only on the exterior.

  • Okay, Both of them are cooked.

  • So now I want you to hold that tree there, so I'm gonna throw first.

  • This is the patty that insulted on Lee on the exterior.

  • You got it?

  • Huh?

  • Do you hit my nards?

  • Okay, that was the Unsalted Berger Berger was only felt it in the exterior.

  • And you saw it fell apart just from the force of me throwing it before it even got anywhere near you.

  • And that's what you want in a burger.

  • At least that's what I wanted.

  • But I wanted to be really so tender that it just it just falls apart in your mouth, like, barely barely held together.

  • I'm gonna show you what happens if you salt your meat before finding it or before forming the patterns.

  • Ready?

  • You eat that.

  • It gets it's sort of rubbery texture, which is in a sausage.

  • A good thing that robbery snapped that you get in the sausage but not really what you want in a burger.

  • Don't salt your Patties before you grind it.

  • Do assault.

  • You're friends with burger Patties.

  • You just threw a burger.

  • Patty, have you?

  • Yeah, I think.

  • I mean, I'm sure you were good.

  • Now let's get to grinding the meat, right?

  • I think that's plenty for me.

  • The next myth we're gonna talk about is that your burgers need to be formed and shaped in a very specific way.

  • And yeah, for this burger, we're actually gonna not really form it at all.

  • Rather than picking up the meeting for me in the Patties, all we're gonna do this kind of gently shape it into a party like this super lightly.

  • What I'd like to say is that once, once the beef have been ground, we never pick up the beef again with human hands.

  • The goal that we're going for here is a maximum surface area for crispness and browning.

  • And that's really what we don't want a present flat because, you know, the smoother surfaces, the less surface area to volume ratio you're gonna have.

  • So the more nooks and crannies, Yes, it's like an English muffin.

  • More nooks and crannies.

  • You have the crispier and better stop everything.

  • Exactly.

  • So for your burger makers at home, the key thing to remember is you wanna handle your meat as little as possible.

  • My two basic toppings on a burger.

  • I don't know what yours are.

  • If I had to pick just two toppings, it would be pickles on onions, a green tomatoes when they're in season and it's gonna be lettuce for me.

  • It needs to be shredded iceberg.

  • All right, so we got our lettuce, we got a tomato.

  • Um, now we're gonna go into this onion.

  • Now, if you look at an onion, there's two different ways you can cut it.

  • If you imagine this is a planet and it's going rotating around this axis, we've got an orbital lee, which is the way, like a satellite in orbit around it, right on the plate around it, and you'll get onion rings or you can cut it from pole to pole.

  • It actually makes a pretty significant difference which direction you cut it on.

  • And the reason for that is because onion cells are not symmetrical.

  • They are.

  • They're sort of elongated in one direction, haven't have this property.

  • Um, so imagine this when you were a kid, Did you?

  • Looking like a microscope.

  • Did you ever look at onions under it?

  • When you see it looks almost like this.

  • And as he's like, sort of elongated cells and those cells run this way.

  • They run from pole to pole to the cells are much longer that way, and they are the other way.

  • And the thing about onions and other alliums is that that sort of pungent flavor that you know, the thing that makes you cry.

  • I think that gives you that pungent flavor in your nose.

  • Those chemicals, they don't exist in a raw onion.

  • What happens is when you cut open onion cells, there's the precursor chemicals that come out and they interact with each other, and then they form these sort of pungent aromas After after slicing.

  • So more cells you break in an onion.

  • Uh, more like crying Exactly the more it'll make you cry, the more of those bad flavours takes all that stuff out, puts it in the air.

  • Exactly.

  • Imagine you're slicing this onion multiple.

  • Let's go down way.

  • So you're slicing it that way.

  • You're essentially just cutting like a single row of cells.

  • So right now you've released about whatever you no one sells worth, maybe two cells worth of stuff in this little section.

  • But if you're cutting across the equator, yeah, you're cutting all those cells.

  • And that's exactly what happens when you cut when you come across a quitter.

  • So all this stuff gets released, you get a much stronger 100 c by cutting it across.

  • That's so cool.

  • So I got here tiny little skillet, so essentially about the same size as the burger.

  • Right.

  • And this is plan you want, want.

  • And this This is precisely why a burger like this is ideal for people at home by themselves.

  • Not great for a restaurant, Not great.

  • If you're cooking for a crowd because you really need that saying you need to go get one at a time needs to be in a small skillet.

  • Then I'll show you why.

  • So we put a little oil in the pan, so those kosher salt after this meat has been ground way, have not picked it up with our very we haven't seasoned it, and we have not picked it up with our bare hands.

  • Carefully flip it over spatula only, No hands carefully.

  • So we got our pan a smoking hot year.

  • It's at around 400 degrees right now.

  • We're gonna take our burger patty as it cooks.

  • That's gonna render out of it.

  • And it's gonna sort of start to tilt the pan a little bit so deep frying in its own fat, You know, you get all that extra flavour you get.

  • All that, Christine, is that he did this on a couple of bigger pan.

  • All that matches drains away.

  • How long do you say first side?

  • About a minute about were decided.

  • Cream.