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  • In this American English Pronunciation video, youre going to come with me on vacation

  • to study real life English conversation.

  • - Oh my God! That’s amazing. - Poor Gina!

  • That is so cute.

  • Every year, my extended family gets together for a week to play, swim, and have fun together.

  • First, let's head to the beach.

  • - Hey Ri! You enjoying the beach? - Yeah.

  • - Except for you got a face full of water? - Yeah!

  • Except for you got.

  • Let’s talk about the phraseexcept for’, it’s pretty common.

  • The T comes between two consonant sounds, and in that case, natives often drop the T sound.

  • I did.

  • Except for--

  • Just the P then the F, excepfor.

  • Also, notice that I reduced the wordfor’.

  • Fer, fer.

  • Except for--

  • Except for you got.

  • Listen again.

  • Except for you got...

  • - a face full of water? - Yeah!

  • - What happened? Tell me about it. - It got bigger.

  • - Well, it got my no [nose!], that I, I start choking.

  • Oh no! She started choking! So glad she’s alright.

  • Well this is the perfect day for him. Overcast and warm.

  • How did my mom pronounce the word AND?

  • She reduced it to ‘n’. Just the N sound. Listen again.

  • Well this is the perfect day for him. Overcast and warm.

  • Overcast and warm.

  • This is how it’s normally pronounced, unless you want to stress the wordand’.

  • Here, my cousin stresses it:

  • What about standing up like Gigi?

  • Check this out: she can pull hair and stand up at the same time.

  • She can pull hair and stand up at the same time.

  • And”, fully pronounced.

  • Pull hair and stand up--

  • Most of the time, youll want to reduce this, nn, just like my mom.

  • Overcast and--

  • Can you wave, Gina? Hi!

  • Can you wave?

  • We reducecanwhen it’s a helping verb, that is, not the main verb in the sentence.

  • WAVE is the main verb.

  • Most of the time, ‘canis a helping verb: kn, kn.

  • Can you wave?

  • Listen again.

  • Can you wave, Gina?

  • Hi!

  • On this day, it happened to be Gina’s first birthday.

  • We sang happy birthday to her. Do you know this song?

  • Happy birthday to you! Happy birthday to you!

  • Happy birthday dear Gina! Happy birthday to you!

  • And now onto meal time.

  • -How's the meal? -The lasagna’s pretty good.

  • Not quite as good as Marlise’s, but not bad.

  • Pretty good.

  • We use this phrase a lot.

  • It means okay, but not great.

  • How are you?

  • Pretty good.

  • How was the movie?

  • Pretty good.

  • What do you notice about the pronunciation?

  • The lasagna’s pretty good.

  • Pretty, pretty.

  • That’s a Flap T. Not a True T, pretty, but a Flap T, pretty.

  • This is the American English pronunciation.

  • I write it with a D, but depending on your native language, it may sound like an R to you.

  • Just flap the tongue against the roof of the mouth without stopping the air.

  • Pretty.

  • The lasagna’s pretty good.

  • Pretty good, with the UH as in PUSH vowel.

  • My uncle makes it very clear.

  • See if you can imitate him.

  • Pretty good.

  • You wanna go watch the tennis game?

  • Wanna

  • Want toshifting towannain conversation.

  • You wanna go watch?

  • Listen again.

  • You want to go watch the tennis game?

  • My family loves to play tennis on vacation.

  • Very few of us are any good at it.

  • These are the fans out for the big match.

  • These are the fans.

  • Did you notice how my dad reduced the wordare’?

  • These are, these are.

  • This is how we pronounce ARE, it just sounds like an extra syllable at the end of the word before.

  • These are.

  • These are the fans. Listen again.

  • These are the fans...

  • out for the big match.

  • Don’t go easy on him, Ernie.

  • Easy on him.

  • What do you notice about the wordhim’?

  • No H!

  • We pronouncehimthis way a lot.

  • Just likeare’, when it’s reduced, think of adding an extra syllable to the end of the word before it.

  • On him, on him.

  • Easy on him.

  • Listen again.

  • Don’t go easy on him, Ernie.

  • Let me go check on him.

  • Here’s another HIM reduction: Check on him.

  • On him, on him, on him.

  • Listen again.

  • Check on him.

  • Um, wait, when did you meet Gigi in Colorado?

  • When did you meet?

  • Did you, did you.

  • Did you, would you, could you, should you: all common two-word phrases.

  • We often make the Y sound a J sound when it comes after a D.

  • Diijew, jj, jj, jj.

  • Did you.

  • Listen again.

  • When did you meet Gigi...

  • ...in Colorado. When was that?

  • - Uh, we were out there to ski in March. - Okay

  • Anybody want to hit a few with my partner?

  • Anybody wanna hit a few?

  • Did you hear that in the background?

  • Wanna. Listen again.

  • Anybody want to hit a few--

  • ...with my partner?

  • - Yeah, I will! - Warm him up?

  • I'll warm him up.

  • Again, dropping the H inhim’.

  • Warm him, warm him.

  • I’ll warm him up.

  • Can you grab it? Nice!

  • - Oh! - Oh!

  • That’s what she thinks of your hat.

  • Thinks uhyour hat.

  • Youll notice that we sometimes drop the V sound inof’; we just use the schwa.

  • Uh.

  • Thinks of, thinks of your hat.

  • Listen again.

  • She thinks of your hat.

  • - Hello! - Stoney, who's this?

  • - This is Stoney! - Your cousin!

  • - Oh, don’t whack her in the head. - Don’t let him put his mouth on that, Dad.

  • It's probably gross.

  • Don’t whack her in the head.

  • Did you notice the dropped H inher’?

  • Just like withhim’.

  • Wacker, wacker.

  • Listen again.

  • Don’t whack her in the head.

  • You can’t chew that.

  • Man, it’s such a nice evening.

  • Perfect temperature, slight breeze, beautiful sun.

  • That it is.

  • Listen to how I talk about the weather:

  • Man, it’s such a nice evening.

  • Perfect temperature, slight breeze, beautiful sun.

  • That it is.

  • Perfect temperature.

  • Notice I only make one T: Perfect temperature.

  • So you can think of dropping the T inperfect’, because you have one beginning the next word.

  • Perfect temperature.

  • Also, I maketemperaturejust three syllables: TEM-per-chur.

  • This is an easier pronunciation.

  • Temperature, perfect temperature.

  • Perfect temperature

  • Slight breeze

  • I made the T inslight’ a stop T because the next word begins with a consonant.

  • Slight breeze, slight breeze.

  • Beautiful sun.

  • The T inbeautifulis a Flap T because it comes between two vowels.

  • Beautiful

  • Beautiful sun

  • Man, it’s such a nice evening.

  • Perfect temperature, slight breeze, beautiful sun.

  • That it is.

  • Going out might be sort of fun.

  • Except for that I don’t want to have to go forever.

  • Except for!

  • Did you hear that phrase again?