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  • This is a production of World Video Bible School.

  • To God be the glory.

  • As a new Christian, one of the most immediate issues facing you is worship.

  • Within a week of the time that you're baptized,

  • the services of the Lord's church are going to assemble

  • and you will have the opportunity

  • to worship God.

  • But, you know it might be that you're not exactly sure what to do.

  • You're not exactly sure how God desires for you to worship Him.

  • You need to understand

  • that worship is a great privilege given to God's children

  • and it is certainly something that you want to engage in properly.

  • Now the Bible lists five acts of worship:

  • preaching, prayer, singing, giving,

  • and the Lord's Supper.

  • In this lesson, we want to talk about the Lord's Supper.

  • And, there're three points that we want to cover.

  • Number one,

  • What is the Lord's Supper;

  • number two, the time and frequency of the Lord's Supper; and, number three,

  • we want to discuss some abuses and misunderstandings

  • about the Lord's Supper. Now,

  • first point, number one,

  • what is the Lord's Supper?

  • First, I want us to consider the fact that it is a memorial.

  • In 1st Corinthians 11:23, the Bible says that: ...The Lord Jesus,

  • on the same night in which He was betrayed, took bread and when he had

  • given thanks, He broke it and said

  • "Take, eat;

  • this is My body which is broken for you; this do in remembrance of Me."

  • Now, the same thing was said about the fruit of the vine in verse 25.

  • In the same manner He also took the cup after supper saying, "This cup is the new

  • covenant in My blood. This do as often as you drink it,

  • in remembrance

  • of Me."

  • When Jesus instituted the Lord's Supper,

  • He took the unleavened bread and He said that we are to eat it in remembrance of His

  • body.

  • He then took the fruit of the vine and said that we are to drink it

  • in remembrance of His blood.

  • Friends, it's really as simple as that.

  • The Lord's Supper is a memorial.

  • It's a time to reflect and a time to remember. There's nothing mysterious

  • about it.

  • There's nothing magical about it. I heard someone say on one occasion that

  • partaking of the Lord's Supper

  • forgave their sins.

  • Partaking of the Lord's Supper does not forgive our sins. It is simply

  • two emblems to help us remember.

  • Like a person who might set out pictures of a loved one at a memorial or at a

  • funeral.

  • They do that so we can remember our loved one.

  • A few years ago I was in Washington, D.C.,

  • and I went to see the Vietnam Memorial;

  • and there's a statue there of three soldiers.

  • And next to it, there's a wall with the names of thousands of soldiers who died

  • in that war.

  • Now, here's a question.

  • Why were those emblems set up?

  • And the answer is,

  • to help us remember...

  • so that we don't forget.

  • And the same thing is true about the Lord's Supper.

  • Jesus Christ gave us emblems that represent His body and His blood

  • and they cause us

  • to remember.

  • Now, the next logical question is what are we supposed to remember? Where should

  • my thoughts be as I partake of the Lord's Supper?

  • Well, the Bible says that I'm supposed to remember His death.

  • I'm supposed to remember his body and I'm supposed to remember

  • His blood.

  • 1st Corinthians 11:26 says:

  • "For as often as you eat this bread and drink this cup,

  • you proclaim the Lord's death

  • till He comes."

  • Sometimes people will say that we're celebrating the Lord's death, burial, and

  • resurrection.

  • Certainly they're all tied together and certainly they're hard to separate, but,

  • Jesus said that we do this in remembrance of his death.

  • We are remembering the sacrifice.

  • We are remembering the price that was paid.

  • You know, there's an old spiritual song that asks,

  • "Were you there when they crucified my Lord?"

  • Of course, I wasn't there.

  • But the Bible here calls upon me to use my imagination

  • and to let the scriptures bring to my mind the things that happened there.

  • And so, when I partake of the Lord's Supper,

  • I visualize the abuse He suffered.

  • When I partake of the bread

  • I see the body. I visualize the scourging that He endured.

  • John 19, in verse 1, says, "So then Pilate took Jesus

  • and scourged Him."

  • History says that when they would scourge an individual,

  • they would use a short-handled whip.

  • It had several thongs of various links.

  • And in these thongs there were tied small iron balls or

  • sharp pieces of sheep's bones

  • or perhaps iron chains with small weights at the end.

  • And this scourgers.

  • There were often times be two of them and they would take turns or there might be

  • one who alternated positions.

  • And they would beat the back of the individual

  • until the blood began to trickle

  • and the bruises began to form.

  • And it began to cut into the flesh and into the muscle.

  • It has been said that it hurt so badly that some men had been known to have

  • bitten their tongues in two

  • during the beating.

  • And, when I

  • remember

  • the body of Christ,

  • I think about that. I think about

  • them putting the cross

  • on his bloody, flesh-torn back.

  • And, I envision the nails being driven into His hands.

  • In actuality, it was probably the base of the hands, at the wrists.

  • That would have been stronger. It could support the weight. There's a bundle

  • of nerves there that makes it excruciating and

  • the Romans were all about that.

  • And, then I envision the cross being stood up and dropped into the ground.

  • Can you see the body?

  • Can you appreciate

  • the sacrifice?

  • And then I partake of the fruit of the vine,

  • and I imagine the blood.

  • In my mind's eye, I see the crown of thorns being placed upon His head and the

  • blood trickling down His face.

  • I see His back,

  • bloodied from the beating.

  • I see the Roman soldier piercing His side with the spear.

  • And, I always think about John 19:34:

  • "But one of the soldiers pierced His side with a spear, and immediately blood and

  • water came out."

  • I always visualize that in my mind.

  • Someone told me that the Lord's Supper always means more to them immediately

  • after they've heard a sermon on the crucifixion.

  • And that makes sense because

  • that's what we're remembering.

  • And when you hear a sermon on what He endured,

  • the emblems bring that to your mind and the sacrifice that He made

  • is more vivid.

  • Jesus said... "This do in remembrance

  • of me."

  • Now, why is that blood so precious?

  • Because Matthew 26:28 says because it was shed for the

  • remission

  • of sins.

  • Ephesians 1:7 says without that blood there is no remission.

  • A friend of mine said that during the Lord's Supper, he likes to remember

  • by thinking of it this way:

  • one, two, three, four, five, six, seven. What does he mean by that?

  • Let me go through it for you.

  • One, he thinks about the one Lord;

  • two thieves between whom He was crucified;

  • three crosses that stood on Calvary's Hill;

  • the four parts of His garment, divided amongst the soldiers;

  • the five wounds that He suffered: His head, bloody from the crown of thorns;

  • His back,

  • raw from the scourging; His hands with the nail scars; His feet pierced with the

  • spike;

  • His side bleeding from the soldier's spear.

  • Then six, he thinks about the six hours of darkness upon the earth

  • at the point of His death.

  • And then seven,

  • he recalls the seven sayings that the Lord uttered upon the cross before He died.

  • You know, when we partake of the Lord's Supper

  • it is

  • a memorial.

  • Now, secondly, in answer to the question,

  • "What is the Lord's Supper?" Not only is it a memorial

  • but it is also a proclamation.

  • When we partake of these emblems, we proclaim to the world

  • the death of our Lord.

  • In 1st Corinthians 11:26, the text says:

  • "For as often as you eat this bread

  • and drink this cup,

  • you proclaim the Lord's death

  • till He comes."

  • Why is it important that we proclaim His death?

  • Friends, because of what it means to us. Because it means that we have

  • redemption of

  • our sins

  • and the hope of eternal life

  • in heaven.

  • Now, thirdly, in addition to being a memorial

  • and in addition to being a proclamation, the Lord's Supper is also

  • a communion.

  • In Matthew 26:29, when Jesus instituted the Lord's Supper, He

  • told His disciples, "But I say to you

  • I will not drink of this fruit of the vine from now on until that day when I drink

  • it new with you

  • in My Father's kingdom."

  • Now, what did the Lord mean when He said that?

  • I think clearly it's a reference to the Lord's Supper. It's what we do each Lord's

  • day.

  • And when we engage in that supper,

  • Christ said that we are communing with Him.

  • 1st Corinthians 10:16, calls it

  • a communion of the body and the blood of the Lord. It says this:

  • "The cup of blessing which we bless, is it not the communion of the blood of Christ?

  • The bread which we break, is it not the communion of the body of Christ?"

  • Now, the word "communion" is from a Greek word that means

  • a joint sharing,

  • a joint participation.

  • And, sometimes it's translated as "fellowship."

  • And as I partake of the Lord's Supper, I fellowship with Christ

  • in a very direct way.

  • Jesus said that He would partake of it with us

  • in the kingdom.

  • And, He does that every first day of the week.

  • Alright, point number two in our lesson.

  • Let's discuss the time and the frequency of the Lord's Supper.

  • You know, to many people in the religious world, the Lord's Supper is

  • something that's done very infrequently,

  • perhaps only at Christmas and Easter.

  • And, it's done on no particular set day of the week.

  • A denomination near my house had a sign in front of their building

  • that said

  • that they were going to have a candlelight communion service

  • on Thursday night. Another church said that they were doing it on Friday night.

  • But you see, the problem with that is that's not what the Bible teaches.

  • The Bible says that the early Christians met

  • on the first day of the week

  • to break bread or to partake of the Lord's Supper.

  • Acts 20 and verse 7 says:

  • "Now on the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break

  • bread, (that is to partake of the Lord's Supper) Paul,

  • ready to depart the next day,

  • spoke to them..."

  • I want you to notice that they partook of the Lord's Supper

  • on the first day of the week.

  • And, it's very interesting here,

  • the Greek phrase for "came together" is in the passive voice

  • indicating that their gathering, or their assembly, was not of their own

  • initiative,

  • but rather it was of divine appointment.

  • In other words,

  • this was God's idea that they come together on the first day of the week

  • not theirs.

  • Brethren, the indication of the Bible is that we are to partake of the Lord's Supper

  • on Sunday. It's the day that the Lord arose from the dead.

  • It's the day that the church began.

  • It's the day that the early Christians

  • partook of it.

  • We celebrate the resurrection of Christ

  • every Sunday in that we come together to worship

  • and we remember his death

  • when we partake of the Lord's Supper.

  • Now that we've established the day of the week that we are to partake of the

  • Lord's Supper, the next question is,

  • "How often should we partake of it?"

  • Now, again,

  • the religious world partakes once or maybe twice a year.

  • But the Bible says this about the first century