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  • Hi there.

  • My name is Richard McMunn and in this video, I'm gonna help you pass the British Army Officer

  • selection interview.

  • Now, as you probably already know, if you're going through Army Officer selection, you're

  • going to have to undertake a couple of interviews, one in the beginning to find out whether or

  • not you have what it takes, the potential, to become an Army Officer; and then also when

  • you go along to the Army Officer Selection Board, you will have an interview there too.

  • So the questions in this video are going to be relevant for both stages.

  • I'm gonna go through about 30 questions.

  • My advice is to watch this video from beginning to end and you might know a number of the

  • questions already, but I'm gonna give you some really good tips on how to prepare effectively

  • and what I believe you should be doing and saying during the interview to pass.

  • Okay, so some of these questions are basic, some of them are more complex.

  • I tend to find...my experience of people going through the process is that they can get caught

  • out on the very basic questions, like for example, "Talk me through your CV."

  • So a lot of people will put together a CV about the different jobs that they've had,

  • about their schooling, their hobbies and their interests, but they don't actually read it

  • and study it.

  • And when the recruitment officer says to you, "Tell me about your CV," they can't remember.

  • So make sure you study your CV and you know it in detail from beginning to end.

  • So as I say, a few basic questions and then tough ones as we go along.

  • So first and foremost, why do you want to join the Army?

  • What is your particular reason for joining the Army over the Royal Air Force and the

  • Royal Navy?

  • So have a reason why you want to join, what has attracted you to this fighting force,

  • what are the reasons why you want to join.

  • Obviously, you need to do lots of study, look at the recruitment literature, go on the website

  • of the Army.

  • Find out where they're operating right now.

  • And how about...I would suggest like three reasons why you want to join.

  • And this is an important tip as well.

  • You could say, "I've looked into the values of the Army and I'm really impressed by them

  • and I feel this is an organization that I want to join."

  • So with regards to those values - respect for others, selfless commitment, courage,

  • integrity, discipline and loyalty - we'll go through those in more detail later on.

  • So have a good reason why you want to join the Army, question number 1.Question number

  • 2, what's your family and perhaps your partner think of you wanting to join the Army?

  • Now it's important, as you go through the selection process and let's say you're successful

  • and you go to Sandhurst, you're obviously going to be under a lot of pressure.

  • You need to have the support of your family.

  • But also, it needs to be your decision for joining.

  • You don't want to be saying, "Well, my family are supportive.

  • It was actually them who wanted me to join, who recommended I do in the first place."

  • That's no good.

  • This needs to be your decision and your decision alone.

  • Remember, you're going to be away from home, a lot of people who join the Army or the forces

  • in general have no prior experience of being away from home.

  • So that's another one, what experience have you got of being away from home and how do

  • you think you would cope with the discipline?

  • So what your family think, and I would say, in response to that, "I have spoken to my

  • family in detail.

  • I have their full support.

  • In fact, they're looking forward to me leaving home."

  • You know, something like that.

  • Make it a little bit light-hearted, but you have the support.

  • But overall, you need to say, "This is my decision and I have their support but even

  • if I didn't, I would still be wanting to join.

  • This is my decision to join."

  • That's 2 question.

  • Question number 3, what preparation work have you done in the build-up to the selection

  • process?

  • First and foremost, you've been doing loads of research online, looking on the website

  • of the Army, finding out where they're operating at right now, so there could be a follow-up

  • question there.

  • Well, you've just mentioned about where the Army are operating, tell me.

  • So have a look into the Army, where they're operating right now, what the bases are, especially

  • with regards to your chosen branch, where the bases are in the UK and also abroad.

  • So you've been looking at the website, even if you can go along to an army base, you'd

  • have to get prior approval before you go along, but maybe speaking to some of the officers

  • there, if you can do, to find out, and also, obviously, the recruitment center, the Army

  • careers advice center, speak to them, finding out as much as possible about what is involved

  • with the job.

  • Next one, what experience do you have of leading, managing, or supervising?

  • So if you're going to join as an Army or apply to be an Army Officer, you're going to be

  • a leader and a manager.

  • I'll come on to that in more detail in a second.

  • But if you're going to be a leader and a manager, you need to have had some prior experience.

  • Now some people have said to me, "I want to become an officer but I've got no prior experience

  • of leading or managing."

  • And I say to them, "Go out and get some experience of leading or managing."

  • You know, you can get it.

  • Or at the very least, shadow maybe your own boss.

  • Let's say you're at work and you've got a supervisor or your manager, shadow him or

  • her to find out what's involved.

  • You'd say, "I've got no prior experience, but I volunteered to shadow my manager or

  • my boss and I took notes of what they did during the day, whether they carried out appraisals

  • of staff, how they motivated their team as well."

  • So think about what experience you have of leading and supervising, but also demonstrate

  • there that you are willing to learn.

  • This is really important, and it's a really important quality of an Army Officer is being

  • able to learn and develop your own skills and learn from other people.

  • You could also say that you've been reading leadership books.

  • You know, read leadership books.

  • There's loads of them.

  • If you go on Amazon, think about some of your favorite leaders and that's another question,

  • who is your favorite leader?

  • Maybe think about somebody and then read a book.

  • You know, it could be...

  • Let me put a good leader out of thin air.

  • Sir Alex Ferguson, for example, he's got a few books out, you could read that and say,

  • "Really admire him for these reasons.

  • I've been reading his books to find out about how he would lead and motivate staff."

  • Now obviously, Alex Ferguson, he's not in the forces, but the style of leadership and

  • management is very similar, how you motivate your team and get the most out of them.

  • Okay, so next one, why do you want to become an Officer in particular?

  • You know, why not just become...

  • I'm not saying there's anything wrong with regular soldiers, they do an amazing job,

  • but why not become a regular soldier?

  • Why do you want to be an Officer?

  • And you would have to have a good reason for that.

  • You could say that, "I feel I have the potential to be a leader and a manager and the reason

  • is because I've been looking at my manager at work and she's really good at what she

  • does.

  • I like the way she motivates people.

  • And I feel I could do the same."

  • You could also say, "I tend to find that people gravitate towards me.

  • I find that I'm the first person to put my hand up if there's a problem at work or in

  • education, something needs dealing, dealing with or sorting out, I'll be the first person

  • to stand up, you know, and I feel like I want to be a leader and a manager."

  • And what are the qualities of an Army Officer?

  • So if we look at a few of these qualities...

  • And just by the way, at the end of this video, I'll tell you where you can download all of

  • these questions.

  • You can also get a copy of these things that I've put and also some sample interview questions

  • and responses in detail too.

  • So a number of the qualities, this list is not exhaustive, but I feel it's a really strong

  • list.

  • You have to be disciplined.

  • You have to be honest, really important, honest, trustworthy.

  • You have to be a man or a woman of integrity.

  • You have to be loyal to the Army.

  • You have to also act as a positive role model, so what you don't wanna be doing is you're

  • going out at weekends, getting right on the beers and creating a bad impression for your

  • team.

  • They look at you and think, "Oh, he or she is a good laugh but they're not really setting

  • a good example."

  • So you have to be a positive role model for the Army.

  • You have to be organized.

  • You have to be disciplined.

  • You have to also be competent in your role.

  • You know, learn your skill quickly and be good at it.

  • You have to be professional, committed.

  • You have to set standards that others can follow, and you also have to be a supportive

  • team member, supporting your colleagues, your other Army Officers, and a great communicator,

  • both written and also speaking verbally.

  • You have to be a great communicator.

  • So it's not just about telling people what to do, it's about listening as well to people's

  • concerns.

  • An Army Officer has to be a visionary, somebody who looks forward at the end goal of what

  • the Army wants to achieve, and they get their team there in the best route possible.

  • You have to be decisive, making decisions, but also being prepared to take responsibility

  • so if things go wrong, then you change course and adapt quickly.

  • You have to be able to plan and you have to be able to adapt.

  • So those are going along to AOSB know you'll have to be doing like some planning exercises,

  • some work...

  • You know, that's another tough thing that you got to be prepared for.

  • So I'll tell you where you can get a copy of this that I've put there, but I would be

  • listing those out when responding to the interview question, "What are the qualities of an Army

  • Officer?"

  • Let's have a look at the next one.

  • What's the difference between a leader and a manager?

  • A good one.

  • These two things, as an Army Officer, you have to be a good leader and you have to be

  • a good manager as well.