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  • today we're gonna talk about a topic that has been heavily, heavily requested in the past five messages for D M E mails, all that stuff.

  • It's also been a topic that's caused some confusion in previous videos I've made.

  • We're talking about what is the perfect temperature to use when bring a cup of coffee.

  • How hard should my water be when I'm making drip or filter coffee of any kind?

  • Espresso brewing temperature is a whole other topic, but I will get to that another time.

  • Another day today is just about filter coffee.

  • There is this idea that has persisted that if you use boiling water to make coffee, then it will taste burnt.

  • You see it online in books kind of everywhere.

  • I'm not sure that's true. 00:00:57.860 --> 00:01:2.450 Now there is a correlation between brewing water temperature and extraction. 00:01:2.840 --> 00:01:8.120 Generally speaking, the heart of the brew water is the more energy it provides for chemical reactions. 00:01:8.130 --> 00:01:12.160 One of those reaction groups is stuff going into solution and again, certain compounds.

  • Certain flavors go into solution at different rates at different temperatures, so there's a link unquestionably, but this idea of burning the coffee, this really makes no sense to me.

  • Coffee beans have been roasted up a 220 degrees C plus.

  • Often they've experienced really high temperatures.

  • Ah, 100 degrees.

  • Seawater isn't gonna further those kind of reactions.

  • It's not going to cause the coffee to be roasted any darker.

  • It's not going to create much in the way of flavors the way that roasting does.

  • What it might do is extract some bitter tasting flavors and burned ashy, smoky tasting things.

  • If you brew very dark roasted coffee at very high temperatures, that may be where this came from.

  • But we're gonna take a more rigorous approach today.

  • I'm gonna investigate what happens if you use just boiled water to make coffee? 00:01:59.540 --> 00:02:2.620 Because we're not gonna just track the temperature inside the kettle's. 00:02:2.730 --> 00:02:5.920 We're gonna track the temperature in the coffee that's brewing. 00:02:5.930 --> 00:02:6.840 We're gonna use a word. 00:02:6.940 --> 00:02:7.620 It's a bad word. 00:02:7.620 --> 00:02:7.960 I'm sorry. 00:02:7.960 --> 00:02:9.250 It's not appetizing word. 00:02:9.630 --> 00:02:14.000 It's amongst the least appetizing words in coffee, though I think Musa Lidge is probably worse.

  • But we're gonna talk about the slurry right, and the slurry is the grounds in the water as they mix together, either in the top of, say, a brewing cone or inside.

  • Let's hear French press that combination of coffee and water.

  • That's the slurry.

  • That's the temperature I'm most interested in is how this works.

  • Attached to this thermometer is a small temperature probe going into the grounds, and it's just underneath the grounds right now where we're gonna use it to measure the temperature of the slurry.

  • Our boy list kettle on that I'll pour a bloom.

  • This is 30 grams of coffee on, so I'll do a 60 to 80 grand bloom, and I'll wait 45 seconds and then I'll complete the brew.

  • And during that brute will be able to see how the temperature of the slurry increases and what kind of temper gets up to. 00:02:57.340 --> 00:03:0.450 Even though I'm using this as close to the boil as possible. 00:03:1.810 --> 00:03:2.250 Let's go.

  • So obviously, this was a pretty heated brewer on the grounds, and there were a little bit warm, but still, the temperature is nowhere near our kettle temperature and bear in mind during a 45 2nd bloom.

  • For getting to the end of now, this water has cooled down further still, let's keep brewing.

  • So, as expected, the temperature's coming up and it should be pretty stable now.

  • Now, then, to the brew at this point were a peak temperature.

  • What's gonna happen now is that evaporative cooling is going to start to pull some heat out of this.

  • You can see steam rising that's pulling energy out of the brew constantly and again. 00:03:59.250 --> 00:04:1.210 This slurry this there were mass. 00:04:1.220 --> 00:04:7.730 Is it drained through is getting smaller and smaller and smaller, so we'd anticipate a gentle decline in brew temperature. 00:04:7.730 --> 00:04:10.350 At this point, let's let it drain out.

  • So there it is.

  • It didn't even get past 91 degrees Celsius on this kettle, I'll admit, is Capt, actually in 98 degrees Celsius.

  • But even if I'd got it to 102 degrees more, I might not have got past 93 degrees Celsius in the slurry.

  • This is a plastic cone.

  • This was a preheated brewer.

  • The grounds were a little bit warm.

  • There aren't many environments that I could have made this Ah, hot Abreu.

  • And yet this slurry got nowhere near 100 degrees Celsius.

  • And I think the light roasts you need tohave the hottest water you can get so that your slurry temperature is as hot as it can be.

  • But I will confess a pore over is a very different thing to a French press.

  • There's a much slower delivery of water.

  • There's a smaller thermal mass.

  • There are a bunch of challenges of maintaining slurry temp here that you might not have here. 00:04:59.250 --> 00:05:1.310 So now the French press, What we're gonna do is very simple. 00:05:1.310 --> 00:05:2.840 We're gonna boil a kettle of water here. 00:05:2.960 --> 00:05:4.650 We've got 45 grams of coffee. 00:05:4.650 --> 00:05:9.050 I'm gonna add 600 grands of water for my 75 grams a liter ratio. 00:05:9.410 --> 00:05:10.230 And what's your happens?

  • What will happen to the brew temperature?

  • The probe is in here.

  • It will be in sort of top of the slurry where it's at its absolute hottest scripts.

  • Here we go straight off the boil.

  • 600 grounds.

  • So again, it's only gonna get cooler from here on out.

  • We were never close to boiling, even though the water was very, very hot.

  • Now I know you're thinking you're thinking you've got me because was this French press preheated now?

  • It was not.

  • Shall we find out what happens if we do?

  • Preheat the French press.

  • I think we should.

  • But while I prep and clean up and reset. 00:05:57.520 --> 00:06:0.530 I'm going to tell you about this video sponsor, which is squarespace. 00:06:0.900 --> 00:06:6.420 Squarespace is a fantastic way to take the idea that's in your head and turn it into a beautiful website. 00:06:6.430 --> 00:06:8.000 It doesn't matter what that idea is. 00:06:8.010 --> 00:06:9.060 It could be photography. 00:06:9.060 --> 00:06:10.850 You have a portfolio that you want to share.

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  • I think the square space for sponsoring this video so same experiment all over again, except now is nicely preheated what will it do to the broom temperature? 00:07:9.520 --> 00:07:12.680 So again created as much as I could, I could have gone Maur.

  • But at what point am I actually getting any sort of return on my investment of temperature?

  • Little bit hotter, but not a lot hotter.

  • So it's really pretty much impossible.

  • Unless you had, let's say, a jewel walled stainless thing that you did aggressively preheated with boiling boiling water.

  • It's really hard to get to very high temperatures where annual extracts a very bitter, very harsh flavors from medium to light roasts.

  • This doesn't mean that the highest possible temperature is the best for every single coffee, not at all.

  • What I would say is, if a coffee is a darker, more developed roasting, you enjoy that.

  • Know that it's gonna be easier to get those very bitter, very harsh kind of ashy smoky flavors out of them.

  • Don't brew quite as hot. 00:07:54.020 --> 00:08:3.150 Brewing in essentially the mid to high eighties in terms of Celsius will yield a kind of smoother, less bitter result that should still be plenty extracted. 00:08:3.220 --> 00:08:9.060 If you are getting bitter, burnt kind of tastes, then you can just back off that temperature a little bit. 00:08:9.150 --> 00:08:14.380 But for certainly most specialty coffee, it's really pretty hard to get the temperature wrong.

  • You've gotta work really, really hard to have a high temperature here.

  • There's a couple of exceptions to the rule.

  • I think things like siphons are beautiful, and they can brew incredibly hot on that very high temperatures if you don't pay attention to that.

  • But broadly, if you're pouring water from a kettle, assumes you can after the kettle's boiled, certainly with medium and with light roasts.

  • Now, in this video, I haven't really touched on the opposite side of the scale, right?

  • What happened really blue with cold, cool, tepid water, all of that kind of stuff.

  • The topic of cold brew is one that is heavily requested.

  • Obviously, you understand a little bit that you can't extract as much with cold water as you can with hot.

  • That has a number of implications, and some people think it's a good thing, and some people think that's a terrible thing.

  • I'll address this in future. 00:08:56.500 --> 00:09:0.670 Don't worry about that, but we're not gonna go into cold brew at any point now. 00:09:1.310 --> 00:09:2.740 Originally, your thoughts on this. 00:09:2.870 --> 00:09:3.980 Is this a surprise? 00:09:3.980 --> 00:09:6.360 Were you expecting a different kind of result? 00:09:6.570 --> 00:09:10.950 Has this made sense of something that seemed oh so confusing to you before?

  • What a mess.

  • What didn't I talk about in this video?

  • What would you like to see me explore further in the future?

  • I'd love to hear from you.

  • Leave me a comment down below.

  • Yes, I think so much for watching I have a good day.

today we're gonna talk about a topic that has been heavily, heavily requested in the past five messages for D M E mails, all that stuff.

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B1 temperature slurry brew water kettle brewing

Brew your coffee with boiling water - coffee brewing temperatures explained.

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/03/10
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