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  • . This event will have live

  • subtitles. Please sit where you can see the text clearly. Thank

  • you.

  • you. LIAM: Are we ready for some

  • more?

  • Thank you very much to everyone for coming back, I was hoping

  • that we would

  • get a really good crowd back and that too many of you haven't

  • just gone to the

  • pub, which I think my dad has done, which I was tempted to do,

  • I tried to ring him but I think he is two pints deep. Is he

  • happy. We had a good debate this morning for

  • the leadership hustings, it was very camaraderie and friendly

  • and lively so the pressure is on guys to play nice.

  • The 40-second rule we brought in in the earlier event seemed to

  • work quite well, so initially for the first questions we want

  • a 40-second answer and I will be hurrying you along when that

  • comes to a close. Then, after a certain number of

  • questions, we will move to a two-minute

  • final summation, which will close the show. So, we have been

  • going back through

  • questions, we tried to vary things up, because this is a

  • different role and

  • tried to focus on people who are very specific about deputy

  • leadership questions.

  • These are the things I have have been told to say, that I have to

  • say. Candidates drew lots half an hour ago to decide which will

  • stand at which podium. The results mean that Angela Rayner

  • will go first, followed by Dawn Butler,

  • Richard Burgeon, Rosena Allin Khan and, Ian Murray. If you

  • could keep on top of that, that

  • would be great, because numbers are not

  • my thing, or just basic logic. So each question will be asked

  • to every candidate, when the candidates come out we will have

  • no open statement and no candidate will be permitted to

  • interrupt

  • or heckle their owe poniesent, but a bit of light banlter is

  • helpful. If you want to dive in and say things

  • that is fine, but keep it nice and friendly. Shall we start?

  • My first question is from Jennifer Corcoran in Southport.

  • In front row, very brave! It's not a stand up gig. What key

  • message from your campaign can

  • I deliver on the door step to inspire our voters old and new.

  • So it's about the key message of what you want to bring to the

  • position that Jennifer can deliver on the doorstep.

  • ANGELA: Thank you for your question, I

  • did visit Southport during the General Election campaign and

  • the key message is utilising every inch of our movement, our

  • fantastic movement, energising and bringing it together to sell

  • what socialism is about, what the Labour movement is about,

  • that is our greatest thing and that is reaching our full

  • potential as a movement and making sure that everyone can do

  • that.

  • I think, actually my role and my back story talks about how we

  • can unify the party to make sure we get behind our leader and we

  • win the next General Election because I can't think we can

  • wait any longer.

  • (APPLAUSE).

  • LIAM: Excellent timekeeping, Dawn, same question to you, what

  • key message from

  • your campaign can be trifr delivered on the door step to

  • inspire voters old and new.

  • DAWN: Whenwe can wait any longer. (APPLAUSE).

  • LIAM: Excellent timekeeping, Dawn, same question to you, what

  • key message from your campaign can be trifr delivered on the

  • door step to inspire voters old and new.

  • DAWN: When I knock on the door what I want people to say is

  • "oh, yes I know

  • what Labour has delivered for us, Labour has delivered locally

  • and a metro mayor or a crime commissioner and Labour will

  • deliver to us from Government." Labour has made my life better,

  • my

  • family's life better, my children and grandchildren's

  • life better. I want people to understand that socialism is

  • about aspiration, it's about making sure you have a solid

  • foundation in your life, that we build your life, we make you

  • better, we are a part of you and that nobody gets left behind.

  • When I knock on the doors that is what

  • I want to hear them say to me. LIAM: Thank you, Dawn. The same

  • question to you, Richard. RICHARD: Thank you very much,

  • Jennifer for that question.

  • I will be on the door step with you as

  • a campaigning deputy leader. I want a people-powered campaign

  • so I

  • want to strengthen our campaign and message by focussing on ten

  • key policies in partnership with the members and the Trade Unions

  • to sell on the door step. I remember when I joined the

  • Labour Party back in the mid 90s being very

  • taken by the way John Prescott used the

  • role of deputy leader as a campaigning role.

  • I see it in the same way, not a leader in waiting, not a

  • mischief leader in waiting but a team player working for

  • all of you to get Labour back into Government.

  • LIAM: Ian, are you going to be a mischief maker.

  • IAN: Certainly not, but I want to speak

  • to Jennifer about how she managed to get the Labour vote

  • up 7% in the last election, because my main message about

  • standing for deputy leader is to go out and stand in the seats we

  • won and lost and the seats we will never win and listen to the

  • public and reflect on what they are telling the Labour movement

  • on what we have to do to get into Government.

  • We have a Conservative majority, it's a disaster, the only way we

  • can transform

  • the country and places like south port is to listen to what

  • the public are telling us, change it and get us back into

  • the Government so that the people of Southport get the

  • Labour Government they deserve. The first stop is to listen to

  • the seats that we won and lost and listen to

  • people like Jennifer who managed to put

  • up the Labour vote up by 7% for Liz Savage in Southport.

  • LIAM: Thank you. Rosena, what about your key message?

  • ROSENA: Thank you very much, Jennifer and thank you everyone

  • for being here today. My key message are of hope and unity.

  • As the daughter of a single mum who had to work three jobs to

  • put food on the table, as a mixed race child, growing up

  • in poverty under Thatcher and Major I was written off. The

  • Labour Party believed in me, I am

  • the embodiment of what can happen when the Labour Party

  • believes you in you, I now work as a doctor in our NHS. I want

  • to knock on doors and say the Labour Party believes in you,

  • our future generations, let's join together,

  • rebuild from the grassroots and rebuild organisational capacity

  • and take the

  • fight to the Tories and show future generations through hope

  • and unity we believe in them too. (APPLAUSE).

  • LIAM: So, this was a very popular question and I am making

  • no further remarks about it. It is how would you support the

  • leader and how would you overcome any differences?

  • That is from Elaine owe Callaghan in Liverpool. We will

  • start one on that one, Dawn. DAWN: Thank you for that.

  • So, look, people talk about unity, but I have walked the

  • walk of unity. It's great that everyone is talking about being

  • united but I have walked that walk, I have served under two

  • Labour Prime Ministers and they don't come around that often,

  • but we need to get us back there again and we need a Labour

  • Government and I have served in the Shadow Cabinet.

  • I will never, ever join a coup, because

  • nobody votes for a a disunited party. It's a united party that

  • wins elections, so don't just talk about

  • unity,

  • let's show unity, let's show it and so I will take us to the

  • finishing line and

  • we will have another Labour Prime Minister.

  • LIAM: Richard, same question to you, how would you go back

  • supporting the lead what if there were differences between

  • the two of you. RICHARD: Well, whoever wins

  • leadership election, whether it's Becky who I am supporting

  • in this campaign, whether

  • it's Emily, Keir, Lisa or Jess, I will be a team player, lacer

  • focussed on working with and for them to deliver a Labour

  • Government.

  • We have to support our elected leader, I was under great

  • pressure to do the wrong thing, which was wrong for the party

  • when people were trying to get rid of our elected leader, I of

  • course refused to go along with that and I am

  • proud I took the position position. The Labour Party has

  • always been a broad coalition of socialists like myself, social

  • Democrats and Trade Unions, it needsgreat pressure to do the

  • wrong thing, which was wrong for the party when people were

  • trying to get rid of our elected leader, I of course refused to

  • go along with that and I am proud I took the position. The

  • Labour Party has always been a broad coalition of socialists

  • like myself, social Democrats and Trade Unions, it needs to

  • remain like that, as Howard Wilson says "a bird needs two

  • wings to fly" and we can fly together, turn around this

  • defeat and get back

  • into Government at the next election.

  • LIAM: Ian, how do you see that role.

  • IAN: Well the role of deputy leader is to support the leader

  • of the party and not only that but the entire Labour movement.

  • I have already pledged as one of my five pledges to be the voice

  • of the Trade Unions, the affiliates and societies that

  • are part of the Labour family and to be their voice in the

  • Shadow Cabinet and to the leader. I also think the role is

  • to organise, organise, organise and get the party into a fit

  • state in the country to take the policies forward and take the

  • views of not just the leader but the entire Labour movement

  • forward. I think there is one thing that is critical in that

  • is to be a critical friend of the leader.

  • In times gone by every single leader of the Labour Party has

  • surrounded themselves with everyone who agrees with them

  • and I think you need to be a critical friend to reflect the

  • voice of the Labour movement and take that forward so we can have

  • a strong

  • leadership team. LIAM: And you, Rosena, in terms

  • of differences and also working together with the leader.

  • ROSENA: The number one role of the deputy leader is to support

  • the leader. I fundamentally believe that and

  • actually I am the only

  • the only deputy leader who hasn't nominated a cand dealt

  • because I will work with anyone. We haven't been as united as we

  • could have been and should have been at leadership level.

  • I have been proud to serve on Jeremy's

  • front benchs but I had to take some tough decisions about

  • Brexit, but I picked up the phone and I am honoured to call

  • him a friend and I said it whats I need to do, will you support

  • me on that. It's always been respectful because the only way

  • to go forward is to unite and walk the walk and not just talk

  • the talk at a leadership level.

  • LIAM: Everyone is sticking nicely to the

  • time frame, also found my dad over there. He is back from the

  • pub. I was keen to make a few of the other

  • questions we selected to the relevant.... I told you I

  • couldn't remember the

  • order of things, sorry, Angela, same question to you, apologies,

  • how do we see the role in terms of working with

  • the leader and potentially ironing out differences?

  • ANGELA: Well, I think you can't be a leader in waiting, you have

  • to be a support to the leader and I made a conscious decision

  • to stand for deputy leader because my strengths are in

  • organising and supporting our leader. Jeremy will tell me I

  • have always been a friend who has not been shy at saying what

  • needs to be said, but you will also

  • now in my four years I have never been anything but

  • pluralist and supporting our party and our movement.

  • So that is why I have received so much support so far and so

  • much nomination and I thank everyone for your support,

  • but I promise you I will be a campaigning deputy leader that

  • will not do anything that takes us away from power and will make

  • sure that we do get that Labour Prime Minister next General

  • Election.

  • LIAM: So as I say, wanted to select some questions that were

  • pertinent to where we were in Liverpool. One of the main

  • issues facing the city at the moment is that there is a

  • desperate need for a new hospital in the Royal Liverpool

  • Hospital that is going to be five years late following the

  • collapse of Carillion, we did a story saying that the overall

  • cost is £1.1 billion now. One question here which is saying

  • that this person's biggest fear is the continued privatisation

  • of the NHS, can you give your view as to how we can stop this

  • and also reverse it. So, we are starting with Richard on this

  • one. RICHARD: I think the kind of

  • campaign that is going on in Liverpool in support

  • of our NHS and in support of the hospital is the kind of campaign

  • rooted

  • in our communities that as deputy leader I would support. I

  • am proud that the Labour Party has a commitment to public

  • ownership, I think

  • we need to further deepen that and when we analyse our

  • devastating election defeat we have to make sure we don't throw

  • out the baby with the bath water. That means no retreat on

  • our commitment

  • to public observe ownership, no retreat

  • from defending our health

  • service from Donald Trump and his

  • counterparty in this country, Boris Johnson, so I salute the

  • campaign and I will support that in any way I can.