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  • In this American English pronunciation video, you're going to play a card game with me and

  • my family and we'll study real English conversation as it happens among real Americans.

  • The focus of this video is numbers.

  • Two ones. Two twos. Two rooks.

  • We're playing with a double deck of cards here. That means we've combined two full decks

  • so there's going to be two of every kind of card. So my mom says: two ones, two twos,

  • two rooks.

  • So rather than saying: two one cards, two

  • two cards, she's just shortening it into: two ones, two twos, making the number a noun.

  • So she's making it plural because there's two of everything. Two ones. Adding a really

  • light Z sound at the end. Two ones. Two twos.

  • Two ones. Two twosTwo rooks.

  • But there are no sixes and sevens and half of the eights.

  • Sixes and sevens and half of the eights. So here, again, we're using the number as

  • a noun. And we're making it plural. Sevens and eights.

  • For 'sevens', we add a light Z sound. For 'eights' we add an S sound. And for 'sixes', we add a whole syllable.

  • Esessixes.

  • The rules for how to pronounce a plural noun were laid out in a video that I made earlier.

  • Click here to see that video or you can also find the link in the description below.

  • But there are no sixes and sevens and half of the eights.

  • 210. 210.

  • How many points does...

  • - 360. - Ok. Yeah. Oh.

  • So here, we've just heard the numbers 210 and 360.

  • Notice that the words 'hundred and' were dropped.

  • You can say two hundred and ten or three hundred and sixty

  • but it's probably more common in spoken English to drop that and just say

  • 210, 360.

  • 210.

  • 210.

  • How many-- How many points does...

  • - 360. - Ok. Yeah. Oh.

  • -215 -20

  • Two fifteen. Twenty.

  • So 15, how does that sound different from 250?

  • Two fifteen. Two fifty.

  • Two fifteen.

  • There are two clues. First stress is onteen’.

  • In the words that end in a zero, stress is on the first syllable.

  • Fifteen. Fifty.

  • Clue number two, the T inteenis a true T because it starts a stressed syllable.

  • The T infiftymight be a true T or it might be flapped: fifty, fifty.

  • Two fifteen.

  • - 215 - 20

  • Twenty. My dad bids even higher.

  • He didn't say 220 but it's implied.

  • Twenty, What happens to the T there?

  • It's dropped. Americans often drop the T in this word.

  • Twenty. Twenty.

  • This is because the T follows an N.

  • 20.

  • Pass.

  • Pass.

  • As we go around bidding here, if you want to bid higher, then you do so.

  • If you don't want a bid higher and you want to drop out, then you say: passpass

  • Pass.

  • Twenty five.

  • Twenty five.

  • Twenty. Again, David drops the T here: Twenty five.

  • Twenty five.

  • Thirty.

  • Thirty. Thirty. Stress is on the first syllable

  • and it's a flap T so we know it's notthirteen’.

  • Thirty. Thirty. The T is flapped here because

  • it comes after an R before a vowel. Thirty.

  • Try that: Thirty.

  • Thirty.

  • Pass.

  • Pass.

  • Oh, my mom and I both have bad hands.

  • We both pass, we do not continue to bid.

  • Pass.

  • Pass.

  • That's too cheap.

  • Dad says: That's too cheap.

  • He's trying to make us think he doesn't have a good hand but that he's going to bid anyway.

  • He reduces the wordthat's’ by dropping the TH.

  • At's— at's— At's too cheap.

  • This is a reduction you will hear Americans do sometimes.

  • Listen again.

  • That's too cheap. That's too cheap. That's too cheap.

  • Notice the wordtoois stressed and it sounds just like the number 2.

  • These are homophones. They sound exactly the same. Even though they're spelled differently.

  • That's too cheap.

  • That's too cheap. Forty.

  • Forty. He raises the bid.

  • Different from 14 where stress is on the second syllable with a true T. Forty. Forty.

  • Flap T because the T comes between an R and a vowel.

  • Forty.

  • Pass.

  • Five.

  • Yeah, I should have passed before.

  • I should have passed before.

  • Should have is often reduced toshouldain natural American English conversation.

  • I should have passed before. Shouldashouldatry that.

  • A quick flap of the tongue for the D: shoulda

  • I should have passed before. Because I think….

  • Because I... Okay my dad is doing a weird reduction here.

  • First he's reducingbecausetocuzwhich is a very normal reduction.

  • But then he's also dropping the TH inthinkwhich

  • is a little bit less common though I have noticed my dad definitely does this.

  • Because I thinkbecause I thinkIt makes it a little less clear but to a non-native listener,

  • it's still perfectly understood.

  • Because I thinkbecause I thinkbecause I think

  • because I think

  • - Enough table talk. - I think

  • Table Talk’. This idiom means the casual conversation that would happen at a meal

  • but my family uses it to mean talking about a card game when you're playing a card game

  • which you shouldn't do.

  • When you're playing a game. You should keep all strategy and thoughts on the game to yourself.

  • So we sayno table talkorenough table talk’.

  • Everyone in my family is guilty of lots of table talk.

  • - Enough table talk. - I think...

  • Fifty.

  • Fifty.

  • Now, again we have something that's not a true T: fifty,

  • but more of a flap T: fifty. Dadadada

  • Now, this is an exception.

  • It's not following the rules but still this is how most Americans will pronounce this word.

  • Fifty. Different fromfifteen

  • where stress is on the second syllable and we have a true T.

  • Fifty.

  • And there's 360?

  • Yeah!

  • Three sixty.

  • Again, a flap T. Sixty. d-- d-- And again this is an exception.

  • It's not following the rules for the pronunciation of T.

  • Sixty, three sixty.

  • And there's three sixty?

  • Yeah!

  • Cheap!

  • Pass.

  • I'm gonna pass.

  • I'm gonna pass.

  • My dad pronounced hisgonnavery quickly.

  • I'm gonna pass.

  • I'm gonna pass. Gonnagonnagonna

  • I'm gonna pass.

  • I'm gonna pass.

  • I'm gonna pass.

  • I'm gonna pass.

  • Let's go back and listen to all the numbers again.

  • I'll play this section twice. Practice out loud the second time.

  • Two ones. Two twos. Two rooks.

  • But there are no sixes and sevens and half of the eights.

  • Two ten!

  • Two ten!

  • -Two fifteen. -Twenty.

  • Twenty five.

  • Thirty.

  • Forty.

  • Fifty.

  • And there's 360?

  • Yeah!

  • Five.

  • Two ones. Two twos. Two rooks.

  • But there are no sixes and sevens and half of the eights.

  • Two ten!

  • Two ten!

  • -360 -Okay. Yeah. Oh.

  • -Two fifteen. -Twenty.

  • Twenty five.

  • Thirty.

  • Forty.

  • Fifty.

  • And there's 360?

  • Yeah!

  • Five.

  • I had a lot of fun playing cards with my family

  • and I hope you had fun learning the pronunciation of numbers

  • as we studied Real English conversation.

In this American English pronunciation video, you're going to play a card game with me and

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