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  • breaking News Tonight, Canadians detained in Ethiopia, the group of volunteers and workers being held and the allegations against them.

  • Canada's newest Kobe.

  • 19 cases.

  • She's doing the right thing and staying away from others as an American state declares an emergency Democrats campaigning with confidence in South Carolina.

  • I think I'm gonna do well here.

  • Well, I think you're going to make me the next president of the United States.

  • How tonight's state primary could influence voters across the US and she rocks the Canadian student, wowing the science world with her astronomical accomplishments.

  • Global National with Robin Gil Good evening and thank you for joining us.

  • We begin with breaking news tonight from Ethiopia.

  • Global News has confirmed a group of volunteers and staff with the Alberta based charity Canadian Humanitarian is being detained in Ethiopia.

  • Liam Nixon is tracking this global news exclusive from our Left Bridge newsroom tonight.

  • Liam Yes, Robin Global Affairs is aware and has consular officials on the ground now working to ensure the well being of the 13 detainees now.

  • Originally, there were 18 Canadians being held, but Global News has confirmed that five were released on Friday.

  • Canadian humanitarian spokesperson Justin Steed says there are now those 13 detainees, three staff members and 10 volunteers, and they're being held at a police station in the city of Gondor, 600 kilometers north of the capital Addis Ababa, to Ethiopian staff are also currently being held.

  • Steed says the group is being investigated on allegations they were accused of practicing medicine without permission and had dispensed expired medication.

  • Now, In a statement issued to Global News, Steed says in part.

  • Just like all of our trips, our team and organization followed all necessary steps and protocols to ensure our group had all permits needed to provide medical support and care while in Ethiopia.

  • While we cannot comment on the specifics of the expiry of the medication, we can say with confidence that all medicine and care offered by our team was safe.

  • It goes on to say, in collaboration with Global Affairs Canada and the Canadian Embassy in Ethiopia, we're working hard to resolve this as quickly as possible, ensure the fair and humanitarian treatment of our team in accordance with internationally recognized laws and expedite their safe return to Canada.

  • Canadian Humanitarian is a non political organization that has sent hundreds of volunteers to Ethiopia over the last 15 years.

  • Steed says the organization does not engage in any activity outside of their humanitarian efforts, and this is actually a long weekend in Ethiopia, so the detainees aren't expected to be back in court until at least Tuesday.

  • Robin Global's Liam Nixon in Lethbridge, Alberta.

  • Let's bring in our auto A bureau chief Mercedes Stevenson Mercedes.

  • What do your government sources saying about this case?

  • Well, Robin Just two weeks after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau returned home from a warm and fuzzy visit with the prime minister of Ethiopia, thes Canadians find themselves detained.

  • And tonight the Canadian government is confirming they are aware of the detention, although they wouldn't give us a lot of details because there are privacy rules.

  • They did say that the Canadians who have been detained are receiving full consular access.

  • We also talked to and received a statement from Rob Ola Font.

  • He's the parliamentary secretary for foreign affairs, which means it's his job in Justin Trudeau's government to help Canadians who are in trouble overseas.

  • He said something interesting.

  • In addition to confirming that they were aware of the Canadians detention and they are getting access to and help from the embassy, he said.

  • Thus far, the Ethiopian government has been open and cooperative, so that may give some hope to those who are concerned about the status of these Canadians.

  • We also spoke with an international affairs expert who has worked with UNICEF in the past as well as well as other large international organizations about the use of expired medications and whether that would be highly unusual.

  • Here's what he had to say.

  • I consider Ethiopia one of the more developed African nations, and I understand that it had to do with them not being properly registered.

  • But also the factor was using expired pharmaceuticals.

  • Um, I can tell you that from working with you myself and for what?

  • For deputy of the World Health Organization, I have seen actually expired medication used quite widely, but in very remote areas.

  • Now, Robin, that recent visit from Prime Minister Trudeau may be helpful in this situation.

  • The Ethiopian and Canadian governments agreed that they wanted to do more trade together and that Canada wanted to do more to help Ethiopia.

  • The prime minister of Ethiopia is Abby Muhammed.

  • He is seen as a Progressive, who has tried to move the country away from its past with human rights abuses.

  • In fact, well, it is still illegal to be gay in Ethiopia.

  • He has been moving forward, so much so that he received the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts on international security last year.

  • That relationship may help here.

  • Here's what our expert had to say about where things stand between Canada and Ethiopia.

  • Relations between Canada and Ethiopia, very good Canada has quite a big presence there in a number of ways are not only diplomatically but also in terms of the trade and investment.

  • So I think it should be fairly smooth.

  • Process.

  • Ah, the there are a lot.

  • There are a lot worse governments on the African continent bending no Ethiopia.

  • And although the country has faced some allegations of human rights abuses, that sort of thing, things that work pretty well, they're for the most part.

  • So Robin, obviously we will be staying tuned.

  • But the Canadian government is aware of the situation, a relatively good relationship between Canada and Ethiopia and a good relationship between the two prime ministers, which might help here if needed.

  • Robin Mercedes Stevenson in Ottawa, the world is scrambling to stop the spread of cove in 19 Maur, and more cases are popping up in countries far from the epicenter of the outbreak.

  • Tonight, there are more than 85,000 confirmed cases around the world.

  • More than 2000 people have died, mostly in China.

  • But the scare is how quickly cases are multiplying.

  • At least 56 countries now have confirmed cases of Cove in 19.

  • Iran has the world's highest death toll outside of China, and cases spiked again today in the US The man in Washington state has died from the virus, prompting the governor to declare an emergency Here in Canada.

  • Woman in her sixties who traveled from Tehran to Vancouver has contracting the illness.

  • There are 20 confirmed cases in our country, and, as David Achin reports, right now, it's all about slowing the spread.

  • Morning.

  • My name is Adrian Dixon.

  • A Saturday morning press conference, a new confirmed case of Cove in 19.

  • It's Ah, significant situation.

  • Obviously they're Canadians in now, in Quebec and Ontario and in British Columbia, who have tested positive and a common link to all the Canadian cases.

  • The infected patients had recently traveled, often to Iran.

  • This demonstrates how the situation is evolving around the world, and now our response has to continue to evolve.

  • But in the United States, at least four cases have been confirmed with no travel connection evidence, authorities say, of person to person, local transmission.

  • And in Washington state, the first Cove in 19 death, the Trump Administration announced new travel restrictions on those coming from Iran and warned all Americans not to travel to certain parts of Italy.

  • Your South Korea new federal funds will also be made available to state and local health authorities for testing, containment and treatment.

  • We've taken the most aggressive actions to confront the Corona virus.

  • They are the most aggressive taken by any country.

  • But the president's claim is an arguable point.

  • The province of Ontario, for example, has administered Maur tests than have been done in all of the United States.

  • Same thing in BC where AH 1000 individuals have already been tested.

  • We test some individuals multiple times.

  • That's 1425 tests, which is, uh, well over twice as many have been done in the entire United States early and comprehensive testing is one of the key ways public health authorities can contain transmission of the disease.

  • It is a concern that they're not.

  • They don't have the testing available in the states.

  • Yet it all has to be done in Atlanta, meanwhile, some frontline health care workers air pressing the Public Health Agency of Canada to improve the protocol used when assessing potential Cove in 19 patients.

  • They want to be issued respirators in addition to visors and surgical masks.

  • We need to talk about the precautionary principle, which is simple.

  • When the science is not clear.

  • We have to have the best protection now, whether it's President Trump or Canada's chief public health officials, they all say the risk to public health remains low.

  • But there was work being done in Canada and elsewhere.

  • Toe learn more about the virus, its incubation period and how it gets transmitted from person to person.

  • And that work is important to keep the risk low.

  • Robin David taken in Ottawa Thanks, David.

  • 1/3 day of talks is underway between hereditary chiefs and government ministers.

  • They're trying to reach a resolution over a natural gas pipeline running through it, so it in territory in northern BC Canada's Crown Indigenous Relations minister says the relationship between indigenous people and the government needs to improve, but it's complex.

  • It's 150 years of broken promises and of cynicism, and it is completely understandable about will the government do what they said they're gonna D'oh!

  • The minister's wouldn't get into specifics about the meeting, but they will say the talks are constructive and productive.

  • The U.

  • S has signed a peace deal with the Taliban aimed at ending the war in Afghanistan.

  • America's longest running war.

  • The U.

  • S and its NATO allies went into Afghanistan in 2001 in the wake of the 9 11 terrorist attacks.

  • Today's historic agreement was signed by chief negotiators from the Taliban, Afghanistan's government and the U.

  • S.

  • Under the new peace deal, America will withdraw all of its forces over the next 14 months.

  • But it depends on the Taliban meeting on its commitments to prevent terrorism, renounce Al Qaeda and stop any group from using Afghan soil to plot attacks on the U.

  • S.

  • And its allies.

  • Today is an historic day for the United States of America and the American people.

  • Today we have taken a decisive step toward peace, real peace in Afghanistan, to the Afghan people.

  • This is your moment.

  • Wars have tortured your country since 1979.

  • No more violence, no more chaos.

  • The war in Afghanistan was Canada's longest running war to the last 84 Canadian soldiers left the country in March of 2014 ending Canada's 12 year military presence in Afghanistan.

  • Another flood of refugees and migrants from Syria is headed toward Europe.

  • Turkey, already hosting millions of Syrian refugees, has relaxed border controls, saying the refugees are now the world's problem.

  • Today, Greek police fired tear gas and groups of migrants throwing stones on its border with Turkey.

  • Thousands of refugees gathered trying to cross nearly a 1,000,000 refugees and migrants crossed from Turkey to Greece is islands in 2015 setting off a crisis over immigration in Europe.

  • It all comes amid a military escalation in Syria's Idlib province.

  • Turkey pounded soldiers of the Syrian regime Friday.

  • It's retaliation for Syrian airstrikes that killed 33 Turkish soldiers.

  • The Syrian military offensive back by Russian airstrikes has emptied entire towns.

  • Close to one million people have fled their homes.

  • The presidents of Turkey and Russia spoke by phone Friday.

  • The two will reportedly meet in Moscow next week in an effort to prevent an all out war.

  • It's decision day for Democrats in South Carolina, coming up the latest state to vote in a primary plus, finding 17 new planets and counting a Canadian University students.

  • Remarkable track record On this Saturday night in South Carolina, voters are on pins and needles.

  • That's where the Democratic Party is holding its latest primary, and the ballots are being tallied tonight.

  • Jennifer Johnson looks at how these results could be a big factor.

  • How the rest of this race for the presidential nomination plays out.

  • All eyes are on former vice president Joe Biden as he banks on a win in South Carolina to jump start his campaign going into Super Tuesday, Biden believes a critical win will lead to victories in several other states that hold votes March 3rd.

  • I think I'm gonna do well here, and I think that's gonna put me in a position to do well and North Carolina, now in other states.

  • Polls in South Carolina opened early, and there was a steady stream of voters ready to cast their ballots, some still undecided.

  • I'm in a really big dilemma about what I'm going to dio.

  • But some experts believe South Carolina's diverse population will help undecided voters make their decisions next Tuesday.

  • South Carolina is really the first primary in the nation that really reflects the base of the Democratic Party, largely African American voters, as a new Fox News poll shows every Democratic candidate beating President Donald Trump in November.

  • The president also campaigned in South Carolina Friday night.

  • So is easier to be crazy.

  • Birdie.

  • Oh, our Sleepy Joe.

  • A covert 19 crisis becoming a campaign issue, as the president called it, The Democrats knew Hoke's current Democratic front runner, Bernie Sanders, fired back.

  • One might think that in the midst of a major health care crisis, the president of the United States would be assembling doctors and scientists and researchers, not Donald Trump.

  • Sanders headed to Super Tuesday state Massachusetts to campaign, while others still push for a strong showing in South Carolina.

  • Well, I think you're going to make me the next president of the United States.

  • But all the candidates have their sights on next week, with voters casting ballots in big states like Texas and California.

  • 14 states will hold votes on Tuesday, and the candidates are hoping the winds will be split up, putting the brakes on Bernie Sanders momentum.

  • Robyn Jennifer Johnson in Washington Still ahead.

  • Animal experts sound the alarm on preventing the next outbreak.

  • You're watching Global National Frommer's Dis Ars H one n one DeKoven 19.

  • The epidemics all started with animals.

  • The diseases eventually spread to humans.

  • And tonight experts warn that until the focus shifts to prevention, there's no stopping the next outbreak.

  • Reggie Bikini explains.

  • As Cove in 19 escalates into a global emergency, this is no joke.

  • Animal welfare experts are sounding an alarm that enough isn't being done to stop future outbreaks.

  • This issue has elevated to the to the issue of public health, bio security, national security and global economy.