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  • In the US, summer is sun, sand, and blockbuster movies.

  • And this summer, we're going to use those movies to learn English and study how to sound American.

  • Every video this summer is going to be a study English with movies video.

  • Well pull scenes from the summer's hottest movies as well as favorite movies from years past.

  • It's amazing what we can discover by studying even a small bit of English dialogue.

  • Well study how to understand movies, what makes Americans sound American, and of course,

  • any interesting vocabulary, phrasal verbs, or idioms that come up in the scenes we study.

  • I call this kind of exercise a Ben Franklin exercise.

  • First, we'll watch the scene.

  • Then, we'll do an in-depth analysis of what we hear together. This is going to be so much fun.

  • Be sure to tell your friends and spread the word that all summer long, every Tuesday,

  • we're studying English with movies here at Rachel's English.

  • If you're new to my channel, click subscribe and don't forget the notification button.

  • Let's get started. First, the scene.

  • This is space.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • At some point, everything's going to go south on you.

  • Everything's going to go south, and you're going to say, ‘this is it, this is how I end.’

  • Now you can either accept that, or you can get to work.

  • That's all it is.

  • You just begin.

  • You do the math. You solve one problem,

  • then you solve the next one,

  • and then the next, and if you solve enough problems, you get to come home.

  • Now, the analysis.

  • This is space.

  • A little three-word thought group. What are the stressed words there?

  • This is space.

  • This is space.

  • This is space.

  • The stress pattern is: da-DA-da. Stressed, unstressed, stressed. This is space.

  • This is space.

  • This is space.

  • This is space.

  • We have an ending S: this is-- it links right into the next vowel,

  • then we have a Z sound inis’, and an S sound inspace’. What happens? Can you hear it?

  • This is space.

  • This is space.

  • This is space.

  • It's subtle. But what I would say is, you don't need to try to make the Z sound.

  • This is space. This is space.

  • I think you can just make the S. And I would say this is true of any time word ends in a Z,

  • when that syllable is unstressed, and the next word begins in an S.

  • Another common example of this would be 'has'.

  • That S is actually a Z sound, and if I was linking that into the word 'space', she has space,

  • she has space, has space, I would just make an S sound.

  • S and Z are a pair, they go together because they have the same mouth position, and S is unvoiced,

  • and that's considered strong. Z is voiced and that's considered a weaker sound,

  • and so the stronger sound S takes over that Z, sort of cancels it out.

  • So, try that. I think it will make it easier for you. This is space.

  • To think of just making an IH vowel linking into the S rather than trying to make a Z and then an S.

  • This is space.

  • This is space.

  • This is space.

  • This is space.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • It does not cooperate. What do you hear as the most stressed words there?

  • It does not cooperate.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • I'm hearing 'not'. It does not cooperate. It does not cooperate.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • It does, it does, it does, it does. A stop T in 'it', these two words a little bit flatter: it does not--,

  • compared to 'not' which is longer, and has that falling off in the voice. This part of the stress here

  • is really the part to me that shows it's stressed. The voice has to go up in order to come down.

  • But it's that downward pitch, that downward fall, this is not-- not--

  • that shows me, okay, this is stressed. It does not cooperate.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • Co-op-- two o's, the first one makes the OH diphthong: Co--,

  • then the AH as in father. Cooperate. Cooperate.

  • And a stop T at the end. Actually, we have a stop T here. We have three stop T's.

  • So for this first T and the second T, the T is a stop T because the next sound is a consonant.

  • In this last T, the T is a stop T because it ends the thought, the thought group, the sentence.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • How would that sentence sound if I made all of those T's a true T?

  • It does not cooperate.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • It sounds really different to me. It feels really different. It feels rushed.

  • We don't take the time to release those true T's because it takes up time, and we don't need it.

  • It makes it less smooth. There's a little stop in air, a little break and that shows us that it's a T. It does--

  • that's different from: ih does, ih does-- There, there's no stop but if I say: it does, it it it it it does,

  • that little break, that little lift, that is the T.

  • This can be confusing because a lot of people say: well, I don't hear that T. I get it. It's not released

  • but there's a little break, and that, to us, is the T.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • At some point--

  • Whoa! Different day, different outfit, important announcement.

  • Did you know that with this video, I made a free audio lesson that you can download?

  • In fact, I'm doing this for each one of the YouTube videos I'm making this summer.

  • All 11 of the Learn English with Movies videos!

  • So follow this link or find the link in the video description to get your free downloadable audio lesson.

  • It's where you're going to train all of the things that you've learned about pronunciation in this video.

  • Back to the lesson.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • It does not cooperate.

  • At some point--

  • Now here, we have another T followed by a consonant. Let's see how that's pronounced.

  • At some point--

  • At some point--

  • At some point--

  • At some point-- at-- at-- it's not released, is it? At-- at-- at-- at-- It's also a stop T.

  • That's because the next sound is the consonant S.

  • At some point-- at some point-- at some point--

  • What about this T? How's that pronounced?

  • At some point-- at some point-- at some point--

  • Also not released. At some point-- point--

  • if it was released, it would sound like this: point, at some point--

  • but it's not, it's: at some point-- point, point, a little bit of a nasally stop there.

  • The sound before is the nasal consonant N. At some point. Point-- what if the T was dropped?

  • Then it would sound like this: at some poin-- poin--

  • It's not quite that: point, point, that abrupt stop.

  • That is the T. And the word 'some' is the stressed word in this thought group.

  • At some point. So let's look at this.

  • We've studied three little thought groups so far. We've had five T's, and they're all Stop T's.

  • None of them are true T's. When you stop and study the pronunciation of T's,

  • you realize that there aren't even that many that are fully pronounced.

  • Even though when you look up a word in the dictionary, it will probably show just the one symbol

  • which is this symbol, and that's the symbol for the true T.

  • So you really have to study how Americans actually pronounce the T

  • in order to get a natural sounding T pronunciation yourself.

  • At some point-- at some point--

  • At some point, everything's going to go south on you.

  • Everything's going to go south on you.

  • Let's talk about our stress syllables there, our longest syllables with the up-down shape. What do you hear?

  • Everything's going to go south on you.

  • Everything's going to go south on you.

  • Everything's going to go south on you.

  • I'm hearing the first syllable: everything's going to go south on you.

  • What does that mean? To go south, that's a direction, right?

  • If you're looking at a map of the US, it's the downward direction.

  • So when things go south, what we mean idiomatically is that they start doing very poorly.

  • So when he says: everything is going to go south on you, that means at some point, when you're in space,

  • things are going to go really wrong. Your equipment's going to fail, who knows?

  • Something is going to go poorly. It's going to go south.

  • Everything's going to go south on you.

  • Everything's going to go south on you.

  • Everything's going to go south on you.

  • Let's look at the rest of the words besides our stressed syllables. What's happening here?

  • Everything's going to go south on you.

  • Everything's going to go south on you.

  • Everything's going to go south on you.

  • Everything is going to go--

  • Everything is going to go--

  • Going to go-- pronounced: gonna go. So we have a reduction here: going to-- becomes gonna.

  • Everything's gonna go south on you. And 'on you' unstressed, flatter in pitch, but no reductions.

  • Everything's going to go south on you.

  • Everything's going to go south on you.

  • Everything's going to go south on you.

  • Everything's going to go south, and you're going to say 'this is it'--

  • He repeats himself and this time, he's stressing EV even more.

  • Everything's going to go south-- South has less stress here because he's already talked about what will happen.

  • Things will go poorly. But now, he's really stressing that everything will go poorly.

  • So that EV syllable gets the most stress. Another gonna reduction. Going to, gonna, gonna, gonna, gonna.

  • Practice that right now and can you do it without moving anything except your tongue?

  • Gonna, gonna, gonna, gonna.

  • I have my jaw dropped and I'm only using my tongue to say that. Everything's really relaxed. It's the G consonant,

  • UH as in butter vowel, and schwa.

  • Gonna, gonna, gonna, gonna. Do it without moving your lips at all.