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  • Hello there, my name is Richard McMunn from the interview training company, PassMyInterview.com.

  • And in this tutorial, I'm going to give you SEVEN TOUGH MANAGER INTERVIEW QUESTIONS AND

  • BRILLIANT ANSWERS!

  • So it does not matter what kind of manager interview you have coming up, I promise you,

  • this tutorial will make a huge difference to your preparation.

  • Please do stick around and watch it from beginning to end.

  • Now, before I get into those seven tough manager interview questions and answers, a very warm

  • welcome to my training tutorial.

  • That's me there in the center.

  • The bald chap!

  • My name is Richard McMunn.

  • I am a former Fire Officer of 20 years.

  • I then founded the interview training website, PassMyInterview.com, which focuses on giving

  • you top scoring answers to your interview questions.

  • I was also a manager myself for many, many years, and so I have a great approach to answering

  • manager interview questions.

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  • the notification bell on, that way you won't miss out on any of the weekly training videos

  • I am uploading, and I would also appreciate your support by giving the video a LIKE!

  • Thank you very much.

  • I very much appreciate that.

  • Okay, let's get straight into those seven tough manager interview questions and answers.

  • Please do take notes as I progress.

  • And I will also tell you at some stage where you can download the full set of slides, the

  • interview, questions and answers that are coming your way right now.

  • So tough interview question number oneWhat principles would you follow as a manager?

  • So, what principles would you follow as a manager?

  • Here's my suggested answer.

  • I would follow five core principles as a manager.

  • These are LEADING, PLANNING, ORGANIZING, STAFFING and CONTROLLING.

  • I would LEAD by example and take full responsibility, not only for my own actions and performance,

  • but also that of my team.

  • I would plan everything well in advance to ensure we were on track to achieve the organization’s

  • objectives.

  • I would organize my team to ensure all team members were not only playing to their strengths,

  • but that they also had the resources and support to do their jobs properly.

  • In respect of staffing, I would take my time to choose the right people for each position

  • advertised within the team; and finally, I would maintain control of my team’s output

  • and performance through regular team meetings, appraisals and by only accepting the very

  • highest standards of work from everyone.

  • So, that's a rock solid answer to that question.

  • It demonstrates you have the right principles, and you will notice that I do this with a

  • lot of answers to interview questions, tough interview questions.

  • I focus on a number of objectives.

  • Here we have given five core principles that shows that you are intelligent as a manager

  • and you know what you are talking about.

  • Next question.

  • How would you evaluate your team's performance without micromanaging?

  • So there is nothing worse than a micro manager.

  • I've worked in teams before when I was younger where someone micromanaged me, and I didn't

  • feel that I could develop to my full potential.

  • Having said that, you still need to demonstrate that you can manage your team and achieve

  • the objectives.

  • So here's my answer to the interview question - How would you evaluate your team's performance

  • without micromanaging?

  • Here we go.

  • First and foremost, I believe it is essential to set high standards and expectations from

  • the outset.

  • If a team knows you, as their manager, will only accept the best, they are far more likely

  • to perform well without being closely managed.

  • To answer your question specifically, I would hold weekly team meetings to set standards

  • and expectations, and to also set goals and targets for each team member to achieve before

  • the next meeting.

  • I would then expect each team member to have completed their task or project by the deadline

  • I set.

  • That way, the team will get used to making sure they carry out each task as required,

  • and on time.

  • It would be my intention to create a team culture whereby everyone takes responsibility

  • for their own performance and workload.”

  • Now, this works very well.

  • So I am not a massive fan of meetings.

  • However, if I do have a meeting, it's only for a necessary period of time.

  • It might be 30 minutes, it might be an hour, and I would listen to everyone.

  • They would tell me how they've achieved their goals.

  • They would tell me about their problems.

  • And I would put solutions in place so that they could overcome them.

  • I would then set more targets for the next meeting.

  • So the idea at the meeting, is everyone comes there telling you how they performed and whether

  • there are any problems.

  • And you can solve them that way.

  • You are moving forward all the time.

  • How would you address a moral issue within your team?

  • How would you address a morale issue within your team?

  • If you have a team where it has low morale, you need to sort it out and identify quickly.

  • So how would you address a morale issue within your team?

  • First and foremost, as a manager, it is important to understand the causes of low

  • morale.

  • Low morale is usually caused by either wasted potential, people feeling badly treated, a

  • lack of communication, not recognizing hard work and also unrealistic expectations.

  • I would address the low morale head on by initially ascertaining the reason for it.

  • As an effective manager, I would know my team well and I would be able to get to the main

  • cause of the morale problem quickly.

  • I would then take decisive action by utilizing open and honest communication, ensuring clarity

  • of communication, praising and supporting my staff and also holding regular discussions

  • with them to ensure they were feeling valued.

  • To be honest, I would not expect my team to suffer from low morale, but if it did occur,

  • I would take responsibility and rectify it quickly.

  • So that's another great answer!

  • It shows that you identify there is a low morale issue, but you know the causes of it.

  • That's the main thing.

  • So you can resolve it quickly.

  • Next question.

  • How would you manage a team of millennials?

  • That's a tricky question, but one that is coming up more common during manager interviews.

  • How would you manage a team of millennials?

  • Here's my suggested answer.

  • Each generation of employee requires a different method of management and I believe I have

  • the necessary skills and attributes to adapt when needed.

  • I would create a strong team culture that was built upon the core company vales.

  • I would provide strong leadership and guidance, take advantage of their tech-savvy skills,

  • focus on their strengths and continually recognize their work and performance.

  • I would also ensure we were collectively working towards goals that were ethically centered

  • on building a positive future for the company and the customers or clients we were serving.

  • Finally, I would encourage them to be leaders themselves and identify those within the team

  • who clearly had potential and whom could help the organization reach its full potential.

  • So what you're doing there, is youre understanding that millennials may have a different set

  • of drivers, things that drive them whilst they are at work.

  • And you're focusing in on strong team cultures and showing that you're working towards an

  • organizational goal that isethically centeredand then identifying them as leaders themselves.

  • And that's as a great asset to have as a manager when you are prepared to identify leaders

  • within your team who can then go on and help the organization achieve its full potential.

  • That's selfless.

  • And that's a great asset to have.

  • Next question - How would you let one of your team members go?

  • Tricky one.

  • I've been in this kind of situation a couple of times.

  • It's not nice to have to let people go.

  • However, there is a good answer to this question, and that demonstrates you are able to do it.

  • You're able to step up when required and do those difficult tasks.

  • So here we go.

  • The important things to consider when letting members of staff go is to ensure you have

  • followed due process and have held regular performance meetings to give them the opportunity

  • to rectify the situation, if applicable.

  • It is important to not drag out the process, and I would be clear and concise throughout

  • the process of letting them go.

  • I would also make sure I protected the organization by ensuring I had followed all rules, procedures

  • and protocol so there were no unfair dismissal claims later on down the line as a result

  • of the dismissal.

  • My aim would be to carry out the dismissal process by treating them in as considerate

  • and caring way as possible, whilst at the same time being clear, concise and confident

  • in my communication and also putting the needs of the organization first.

  • So that shows that, you know what you would do.

  • You understand the risks that are involved and you need to protect yourself and the organization,

  • but you will do it in a considerate and caring way, and a confident way where possible.

  • That's a good answer to that question.

  • Don't forget, I will say were you can download all of these seven tough manager interview

  • questions and answers very soon.

  • Let's move onto the next one.

  • Describe how you would deliver bad news to your team?

  • So, at times when you're managing a team, you have to give them bad news or negative

  • news.

  • How do you do that?

  • This question predominantly assesses whether you are on the side of the senior management

  • team, because I've been in situations before where a manager will come in and say, “I've

  • got some bad news.

  • Those upstairs don't understand us!”

  • That's no good!

  • You are a manager and you are on the side of the directors, the shareholders, and you

  • have to lead by example.

  • So here's my answer to this question.

  • Whenever I have to deliver bad or negative news to a team, I always get straight to the

  • point and deliver it with confidence and clarity.

  • Then, once I have delivered the news, I turn my attention to the future and the positive

  • aspects of the situation we were in.

  • As an effective manager, I believe I is important to be positive and lead by example.

  • I would then explain the reasons for the bad news, if applicable, so that everyone within

  • the