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  • [laughs]

  • - Dad gum.

  • Very funny when you see it written.

  • - [Both] Dad gum.

  • [upbeat music]

  • - Hello, I am Charlie Hunnam.

  • - He would be the Geordie.

  • This is.

  • - I'm Hugh Grant.

  • I will be instructing you on British Slang.

  • - And I am Matthew McConaughey.

  • I will be giving you the howdys, from Texas.

  • So, what do we got first?

  • Oh, speaking of howdys.

  • - [Hugh] That's one of the British ones.

  • - Would you say that please?

  • - Howdy.

  • - Howdy.

  • That's it, it is one of the British ones.

  • The Texans stole that or did you steal that from us?

  • - You stole pretty much everything.

  • - We probably did.

  • - [Charlie] Wor.

  • - [Both] Wor.

  • - Is that Geordie?

  • - I think so.

  • I don't know if that's the right spelling,

  • but wor like wor-kid.

  • - [Both] What?

  • - Like, you say wor-kid like you would say my friend,

  • or my son, or my little brother would be wor-kid.

  • - It means our kid?

  • - Yeah, it means wor.

  • - It's very interesting, a lot of it comes from Scandinavian

  • because the Vikings came over to that part of the world.

  • - Hence, my blonde beard.

  • - Yeah, look how Scandinavian he looks.

  • - Yeah. - Looks like Bjorn Borg.

  • - With a great hairline.

  • - With a man bun.

  • - Yeah.

  • [group laughing]

  • - [Matthew] Clarts.

  • - Clarts, as in clarty, as in dirty.

  • Devin, bring them clarty boots in here.

  • - Yeah. - Really?

  • - [Charlie] Ha, Jack the Lad.

  • - [Matthew] Jack the Lad.

  • - Well everyone in this movie's a Jack the Lad really.

  • It's a villain.

  • - Did you know that Jack O'Connell has Jack the Lad

  • tattooed on his arm?

  • And he is a Jack the Lad.

  • So it works.

  • - Someone who, you know, a bit of wheeler dealing.

  • Someone might say, you know, can we trust--

  • - He's a wise-guy. - Roger.

  • I don't know, he's a bit of a Jack the Lad.

  • - Someone that might pick your pocket.

  • - The upper class perspective [laughs].

  • - I like that one.

  • Y'all, that's just an easy one.

  • You all.

  • It's a bit of wor.

  • - Wor.

  • - But it's for--

  • - [Both] Everyone.

  • - But you sprinkle it everywhere.

  • - It's very sprinkle-able.

  • - [Charlie] [chuckles] Dad gum.

  • - It's a nice way to say instead of saying,

  • you teach a kid instead of saying damn it.

  • - Oh, dad gum.

  • - Oh, dad gum.

  • - Darn it.

  • - Yeah, very funny when you see it written.

  • - Dad, gum? - Dad gum.

  • - [Matthew] Fixin' to, so, I'm about to.

  • - Oh.

  • - Fixin', so, where y'all going?

  • - [Charlie] Oh, I don't know we're--

  • - Well I'm fixin' to have my lunch.

  • [camera crew laughs]

  • - [Both] Barmy.

  • - [Matthew] Barmy.

  • - Well he's barmy, isn't he?

  • He's barmy.

  • - Bit mental.

  • - Yeah? - Bit mental, yeah.

  • - Bit of a mental case.

  • - All the cricket supporters,

  • who go around the world supporting the England team,

  • are known as the Barmy Army.

  • They dress up in silly costumes.

  • They are barmy.

  • - Bit of a lunatic, bit of a what?

  • - There was some-- - Mad?

  • - Jack the Lads in there.

  • - [Hugh] Bonce.

  • - [Charlie] Bonce.

  • - You know, a footballer, soccer player,

  • might say, you want to bonce mate?

  • [grunts] That's your head.

  • - [Matthew] Bless your heart.

  • - That's universal.

  • - Yeah bless your heart. - English language.

  • - Women in Texas, in the South, oh bless your heart.

  • When you're going through a bit of a tough moment.

  • Dad gum.

  • - [Charlie] We're learning things.

  • - [Hugh] Collywobbles.

  • - Collywobbles.

  • That's some old English.

  • - If you're nervous, first day on the set,

  • oh I've got the collywobbles.

  • - Oh, is it the butterflies? - Butterflies.

  • - Yeah, butterflies in your stomach.

  • - Could it go all the way through

  • and also mean the [beep]?

  • I've just collywobbled me pants.

  • - Yes it could.

  • Quite onomatopoeic really.

  • It's a noise you make in your lower gut when you're scared.

  • - [Charlie] Corn-fed.

  • - How do we use corn-fed?

  • Usually you're looking for big, offensive,

  • and defensive linemen in American football.

  • Big, thick, young men oh, they're corn-fed.

  • We use it in Texas, oh he's corn-fed,

  • someone who's corn-fed is not gonna be your

  • quickest guy on the team.

  • Not gonna be your swiftest.

  • He's gonna be big, burly.

  • - Also, mainly for men?

  • Also women?

  • Is she a looker?

  • [winces] Bit corn-fed.

  • - Perfect.

  • - [Charlie] Dad gum.

  • - [Both] Dishy.

  • - Oh, she's a bit dishy.

  • - Oh, dishy.

  • - Is it like, a good scoop?

  • - Very 1960s.

  • What was his name, that actor?

  • Leslie Phillips.

  • Oh, hello. - She's a bit dishy.

  • - Look at her, she's a dish.

  • - She's not corn-fed.

  • Bit dishy.

  • - [Both] Gaffer.

  • - That's the boss, that's the boss in London.

  • - Yeah, the old gaffer.

  • - There is actually a gaffer on a film set still to this day

  • who's the head of the electrical department.

  • Taxi drivers in London all say

  • where'd you wanna go there, gaffer, sometimes.

  • - All hat, no cattle.

  • That's sort of like a drugstore cowboy in Texas.

  • Meaning the package is wrapped up nice,

  • but there's no product in the box.

  • They're not a gaffer.

  • Dad gum it.

  • - [Hugh] Gogglebox.

  • - The gogglebox, that's the TV innit?

  • - Is it?

  • - That's your television set.

  • Your gogglebox. - Your telly.

  • - [Charlie] Netty.

  • - Netty.

  • - That's the toilet isn't it?

  • Just going to the netty.

  • - Going to the netty I've got the cobble, what is it?

  • Cobble, cobblewobbles, cobble stones?

  • - Collywobbles.

  • - Collywobbles.

  • - Yeah, you'd need the netty.

  • - [Charlie] Bairn.

  • - That's you.

  • - That's Geordie right, kid?

  • - Of course it's also Scandinavian.