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  • I’ll bet that youve heard about this theory that we only use 10% of our brain’s

  • potential and if we could do more than that, we’d have superpowers, teleport and maybe

  • time-travel. This is a century-old myth that got everyone hooked on the idea that if we

  • had more knowledge, we could surpass Einstein. It all goes back to the 1890s, when a psychology

  • professor at Harvard claimed that humans don’t reach their full potential. His statement

  • gained a ton of momentum and started spreading. In the 1920s, a self-help movement began based

  • on that belief, where a ton of books came out trying to motivate people. But the 10%

  • myth was a misinterpretation of neurological research in the late 19th century. Neurologists

  • have now disproven it, saying that on any given day, were able to use 100% of our

  • brain. So, what would happen if we gained infinite

  • knowledge? Picture this: Youve woken up and you feel

  • differently. You scan around your room and see the plant you bought two months ago. Suddenly

  • you know its name, what plant species it is, when it came into existence on Earth, when

  • it will cease to exist, and how it grew from a seed. You watched its life flash before

  • your eyes. Then, at the corner of the room you catch

  • a quick glimpse of the guitar your mom got you from a thrift store. You see how it was

  • manufactured decades ago and who purchased it first. You listen to the songs played on

  • it around a campfire and how the owner ended up giving it to charity. But then, you see

  • its future. Youll accidentally break it in three years while youre moving out of

  • your parentshouse. You head downstairs and meet your brother

  • in the kitchen. You see him talking with your mom about whether he’s done his homework

  • the night before. Youre shocked! Not only do you know what homework he had, but you

  • can also tell that he’s lying, and you can read his mind.

  • Now, don’t get me wrong, there could be some benefits to becoming a real-life encyclopedia,

  • but there could be a downside too. Our brain is like a superfast processing computer

  • with a ton of storage. More than a billion neurons connect to create the network that

  • makes up our thoughts and how we understand the world.

  • Right now, all the neurons in my brain are connecting, and I’m thinking that Mars is

  • the only planet we know of that’s controlled by robots. What are you thinking right now?

  • Let me know in the comments. I’m looking forward to reading the weirdest replies.

  • Your brain is responsible for your sleep, your dreams, your appetite, and every move

  • you make. Our knowledge capacity is colossal. If we had unlimited information, we could

  • find a way to live forever. Or we could descend into chaos. Maybe our brain could create a

  • black hole, or explode. That’d be mind-blowing on its ownLiterally. But I’ll get into

  • that in a bit. The full capacity of the human intellect isn’t

  • fixed, but some studies estimate it to be 2.5 petabytes. So, if our mind was a computer

  • it could store up to 300 years worth of videos. And nocc, petabytes are not dog biscuits.

  • Let’s go back to your room and imagine that you have all the knowledge in the world. There

  • are three possible outcomes in that scenario. One is that youll regret it instantly.

  • You won’t be able to deal with all the knowledge because youll probably learn something

  • you didn’t want to know. You’d be aware of everyone’s thoughts, feelings, what’s

  • happening around the world at any given time, and what’s about to happen. So, it could

  • be damaging to your own sense of self. Another possibility is that youll feel

  • superior to everyone else. You’d know the outcome of any action before it happens, and

  • you could read people’s minds. Because of this, every consequence will be predicted.

  • You’d already know every decision a person will make, even before they do. So, it’d

  • be like watching a movie in real life. And if nobody else is superior to you, then

  • one of these two things could happen. Youll turn into a supervillain where you use your

  • knowledge for bad; or you try the help the whole world. The second one will overwhelm

  • you. Youll have to care for more than just one person. I mean, it’s hard enough for

  • me to keep one Sim character alive. Imagine having to do that with 7 billion peoplein

  • real life. The third possible outcome is that youll

  • lose your humanity. That’s a continuation of the second scenario. Infinite knowledge

  • is something no human has ever experienced. You’d see what happens beyond the universe.

  • You’d know about other intelligent life and alien civilizations. You’d even be aware

  • of whether or not we have souls. Then, you wouldn’t be able to experience the emotions

  • that make us human; such as surprise, hope, wonder and fear.

  • Our feelings are based on the unknown. So if you know everything, it’d be impossible

  • to experience them. You’d become an emotionless robot.

  • One solution is to ignore what you just learned, and act like it isn’t there. But for how

  • long? If youre aware of the outcome of an event, how would you be able to ignore

  • it? Even then, that’s the least of your problems.

  • Remember the neurons I told you about earlier? Well, memories are formed through billions

  • of their connections. These connections are called synapses, and they can become stronger

  • or weaker. In order to form a memory, the brain uses

  • two methods: chemical and electrical synapses. The chemical synapses send information through

  • a neural pathway. Think of it this way: one little neuron releases molecules inside a

  • small space and the neuron next to it picks it up.

  • Now, in an electrical synapse, there’s a gap between neurons. So, proteins create a

  • link to connect the two. Electrical synapses don’t go far, but they are fast. Theyre

  • the ones we use when we need to respond instantly. The chemical one is for processing information

  • that doesn’t require you to act right away. So, if you had to learn all the information

  • in the world at once, you’d only use electrical synapses. And if infinite knowledge were to

  • travel through your brain, it’d overload it. There wouldn’t be enough pathways available

  • for it to go through. So, automatically, your mind will select the data that’s important

  • and delete the rest. That means you won’t know everything after all.

  • But for the sake of argument, let’s assume that your brain has a powerful CPU and huge

  • processing capabilities. What happens to your memory? Memories are our way of telling time.

  • The more we have stored in our brain, the more weve lived and experienced. That’s

  • why time seems to pass slower when were in class learning new things than when were

  • out having fun. Picture yourself in class staring at a clock.

  • When you watch the seconds go by, they seem to be moving slower and slower. Your brain

  • is filled with information as your eyes move. When the pointer lands on the next second,

  • youre still processing data; and it appears like time is slowing down.

  • If you were to gain infinite knowledge all at once, your brain would process that information

  • FOREVER.. Think of how your computer freezes when you import all the data at once. The

  • same thing would happen to your mind. Time will freeze and so will your brain. A brain

  • freeze, without ice cream? Hmmm. But, let’s also ignore these biological

  • limitations! Can we ignore physics too? Let’s go back for a second. While youre trying

  • to learn everything, the electrical synapses will have to create the memories all at once.

  • There we have more issues. Your brain will get overwhelmed with the flow

  • of electrons, then neurons will start shooting signals like crazy. The proteins will struggle

  • to keep up, so everything will go down the same pathway. And that won’t last for long.

  • The proteins will heat up like an electrical wire because of resistance and theyll get

  • destroyed by the current. And this is when gravity comes into play.

  • Your mind is now a small area with an infinite number of electrons. Like all subatomic particles,

  • electrons have a mass, and therefore gravity. So, finite area plus infinite electrons equal

  • a black hole. As the knowledge begins to make its way through your brain, the infinite electrons

  • will create a gravitational pull and start to suck in everything around you. Including

  • your plant and your guitar and your brother’s homework.

  • But your problems won’t end there. There’s a theory that black holes can only grow. But

  • in this event, something called Hawking Radiation will be more applicable, where the black hole

  • will evaporate, and so will your brain. So, it’s settled! We can’t beat biology

  • and we can’t beat physics, it’s usually the other way around.

  • I don’t know, all the knowledge in the world, including predicting the future seems like

  • a LOT of work. I’d rather read the occasional book and watch cat videos on YouTube.

  • Hey, if you learned something new today, then give the video a like and share it with a

  • friend! And here are some other cool videos I think you'll enjoy. Just click to the left

  • or right and stay on the Bright Side of life!

I’ll bet that youve heard about this theory that we only use 10% of our brain’s

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B1 BRIGHTSIDE brain knowledge infinite electrical black hole

What If You Knew Absolutely Everything in the World

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/03/07
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