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  • - I'm Ryan Johnson.

  • - I'm Eric Johnson.

  • - We're brothers and founders of Homage.

  • - And together we train actors.

  • - For some pretty cool roles.

  • - That's it. [Ryan and Eric laugh]

  • [tense music]

  • [Scarlett groans] [spider tank and arm shatter]

  • - Scarlett Johansson, [tense music]

  • "Ghost in the Shell".

  • Scarlett's character's role as Major in this film

  • was a cyborg.

  • A cyborg is a machine, a machine meant to kill.

  • The climax of the movie is one of the final battle scenes

  • where Scarlett is on top of a spider tank

  • and she is trying to open the door

  • with all of her strength and all of her might,

  • and she begins to put so much force

  • into trying to get this door open

  • that she actually rips her arms off her cyborg body.

  • In order to make that look as realistic as possible

  • when were shooting, we decided that we really wanted

  • to focus on her back, her delts and her posterior chain,

  • so her glutes and hamstrings.

  • We had eight weeks to prep

  • before principle photography began.

  • Once we began filming, we continued the process.

  • We had six months where we continued training

  • five to six days per week.

  • To complete this look, we used the pull-up.

  • The pull-up allows you to really focus in

  • on growing the lats, which are those winglike muscles

  • that are on the edges of your back.

  • Over time, as we contract these muscles of the lats

  • more and more, they're gonna grow wider and wider

  • as we place more demand on those muscles

  • to grow and become stronger.

  • [tense music]

  • Squeeze, squeeze, squeeze, squeeze, yep, perfect.

  • [tense music]

  • The Golden V-Taper is the ratio

  • of the width of your shoulders to your hips,

  • and the more discrepancy we can make between those two,

  • the better your physique is gonna jump off the screen.

  • So when we started, Scarlett hit

  • about three repetitions on the pull-up.

  • By the time we finished filming "Ghost in the Shell",

  • Scarlett could do eight pull-ups.

  • In the climax her scene was phenomenal,

  • where her arms ripped off.

  • Scarlett's physique was so impressive

  • that Director Rupert Sanders decided

  • to put a scene in where her back was showcased

  • just because she looked so incredible.

  • - Olivia Cooke, [mysterious music]

  • "Ready Player One".

  • I had six weeks to prepare Olivia for her role as Art3mis

  • in Steven Spielberg's "Ready Player One"

  • without any real clear knowledge

  • on what stunts that she would have to perform.

  • From the book I learned that basically it was

  • an over-the-top treasure hunt based in virtual reality,

  • where the possibilities were endless.

  • Our programming kinda had to represent that.

  • It was how much could we throw at Olivia

  • and how much athleticism could we develop

  • over the course of the next six weeks

  • that ultimately would help her in any stunt

  • that she needed to do during the course of filming.

  • When I first assessed Olivia and when we first met,

  • I could tell right off the bat that she was super invested,

  • high-energy and just really down to do anything,

  • so we kinda hit the ground running because

  • we had such a short amount of time.

  • The big thing that we tried to incorporate was

  • a lot of movement flow, a lot of jump training,

  • a lot of absorbing impacts because

  • that's where the movie lied.

  • Women are more vulnerable to ankle sprains and ACL tears,

  • so that's definitely something

  • that we want to always remember

  • in the beginning stages of our programming.

  • Because the hips are wider, their knees

  • tend to buckle in a little bit more.

  • When you're in a fight scene, you might get pushed

  • into a weird, awkward angle and land incorrectly

  • and blow out that ankle or hurt the knee.

  • We had her jump out to a one o'clock position,

  • and when she landed, we would use the terminology

  • of pretend that you're landing on a plane of glass

  • and you don't want to break the glass.

  • That is the way to safely ensure

  • that she's absorbing impact correctly

  • into her glute, [shoe smacks]

  • into her knee, down into her ankle,

  • and then she's coming back.

  • After a soft landing, she would then return

  • back to her left foot at the center of the clock

  • and then repeating the same thing

  • at a three o'clock position,

  • and then a five o'clock position.

  • Because we're so used to walking

  • just in a forward plane of motion,

  • jumping out to the side in this safe, controlled manner

  • really will be helpful later on, as the stunts progress.

  • I wanted Olivia to learn how to land softly

  • by absorbing the impact of the jump into her hip

  • and into her glute and with a strong knee

  • that wasn't collapsing in, and by doing so

  • you're taking any unnecessary strain off the ankle.

  • A good metric that we had for Olivia's progress

  • was something that I'll say is subway legs.

  • After our first couple sessions, she would come back

  • and joke around and laugh about how she would have to

  • hold on to the railing walking down the subway stairs,

  • and then by the end of the six weeks,

  • subway legs were no longer a thing,

  • and Olivia was running up and down the stairs

  • after a crushing 75-minute workout with ease.

  • Seann William Scott, [tense music]

  • "Goon 2: The Last of the Enforcers".

  • [buzzer buzzes] - I learned the difference

  • between a moment and a career is evolution.

  • [fist smacks]

  • - Seann's character was a hockey enforcer,

  • also known as a goon.

  • That player's responsibility is to protect the star player

  • by beating up the other team.

  • At the end of the first movie, Seann's character Doug

  • blows out his right shoulder in the final scene,

  • so for the sequel, we had to teach Seann

  • how to be a southpaw fighter.

  • Seann and I had six weeks to prepare for his role in "Goon".

  • Making somebody comfortable fighting on ice

  • with their nondominant stance in six weeks

  • is nearly impossible.

  • Imagine writing a letter or eating with a fork

  • with your nondominant side, and then multiply that by 10.

  • A good power punch requires coordination

  • of the entire body, not just the arm.

  • That means you need to learn how to radiate tension

  • off the floor through your ankle, through your hip,

  • through your core and then ultimately dial all that tension

  • through your shoulder, and then into your wrist.

  • Throwing a medicine ball with your nondominant side

  • is much like a punch in that you have to turn over your hip,

  • but it's a much simpler movement to learn.

  • [medicine ball smacks]

  • So there's two versions to the medicine ball side toss,

  • one being more representative of a uppercut,

  • which we throw from the hip,

  • and the other being more representative of a power punch

  • or a cross, which we throw up near the chin.

  • [tense music]

  • [ball smacks]

  • After the medicine ball, we had him progress

  • to the jammer press.

  • And here you can really see that it represents a punch

  • in the way that you need to turn your ankle

  • into your hip, into your core,

  • and then ultimately through your shoulder.

  • [weights clank]

  • When we first began to throw punches,

  • it looked very choppy and unpieced-together.

  • There was a slight hesitation before each throw

  • that you could see that the brain

  • is trying to figure it out, but towards the end,

  • there was really no difference between his left

  • or right side, when it came to how we were fighting.

  • - Ben Platt, "The Politician". [dramatic music]

  • Before I got the call to work with Ben,

  • he had just finished up working on "Dear Evan Hansen",

  • which he actually won a Tony for.

  • In this Broadway show, Ben's character