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  • [snazzy jazzy music]

  • - Greetings, and welcome to my inner child

  • going absolutely insane!

  • This is an Atari Missile Command cabinet from 1980.

  • And not just any Missile Command cabinet,

  • this is a cabaret cabinet that they didn't make

  • as many of as the normal upright ones

  • There were a couple of other types as well,

  • the cocktails, and the environmental, but...

  • I've always been really fond of the cabarets,

  • not only because of the shape and design,

  • but look at that woodgrain.

  • [laughs in walnut]

  • That is factory original Atari-installed woodgrain

  • and, oh man, this is just a absolute dream come true.

  • In fact, not too long ago I was talking about

  • how I don't have any arcade games,

  • and I've always wanted one,

  • and, ah, I got those little mini-arcades,

  • and having visited some really cool arcades

  • in person recently, those kind of things

  • just always re-ignite the desire.

  • Well, I finally got this one,

  • so let's plug it in, check it out.

  • Let me talk briefly about it,

  • because I'm so excited, oh my go-[SHAKES EXCITEDLY]

  • So we got the power cable here.

  • [dramatic synthwave music]

  • So yeah! It is Missile Command, aw dude!

  • So this is easily one of my favorites

  • from the early 80's and I've been thinking about

  • so many different types of arcade games

  • that I might want, if I were to ever, you know,

  • buy one, and get into the whole arcade collecting thing,

  • and, well, I chose this one for a variety of reasons.

  • Again, it's a personal favorite, but also just because

  • of the size and form factor and everything,

  • and if I was gonna get an arcade machine,

  • I want it to be unique enough that it's not

  • easily replicated through emulation.

  • There's a ton of ways to play Missile Command otherwise.

  • I've got a bunch of them myself.

  • I've got an X-Arcade Tankstick with a trackball controller,

  • a whole lot of Atari emulator packs,

  • and a lot of that's super convenient.

  • I'm not interested in emulation for an arcade machine,

  • at least not yet.

  • Wasn't looking for MAME machines, I wasn't looking for

  • emulations boxes, like the 1UP arcades that are sold now.

  • For my first arcade, I wanted dedicated hardware

  • that's vintage and unique and awesome

  • and, I don't know, is Missile Command, I guess.

  • [laughs] So okay,

  • maybe I don't have the most profound reasons

  • for picking this particular machine,

  • except that I wanted it, and it was nearby, and local,

  • it was available, and it had so much woodgrain.

  • It's amazing.

  • I love the side art on Missile Command

  • on the full-sized upright, but, oh man.

  • It does have working coin doors and slots and everything.

  • Some of it definitely needs a bit of repairing.

  • In fact, this one sticks, but for the most part

  • it has been really well taken care of

  • and restored, actually recently.

  • It was from a local place called Joe's Video Games

  • or Lyons Arcade, I don't know.

  • Seems to be known by couple of different names,

  • and they're down in Rock Hill, South Carolina

  • so it's a couple hours drive from me here in North Carolina

  • but, close enough, for sure.

  • I've been looking at them for a long time

  • and, actually, I ran across this one first

  • as a restoration on YouTube.

  • It was a series of videos that Joe did

  • putting this thing back together,

  • you know, getting the trackball working again,

  • and the display working again, and all sorts of

  • other internals and stuff like that

  • that I don't have to mess with if I get it from him,

  • and, plus, I liked the idea of buying local

  • and not shipping from something across the country.

  • Yeah.

  • It's just the fact that it was also, again the cabaret.

  • I've been in love with this design

  • ever since seeing one of these up in Chicago,

  • or outside of Chicago, I don't remember where it is,

  • but it's the Galloping Ghost arcade.

  • It's gigantic, I think it's maybe the biggest in the US now

  • in terms of number of individual cabinets,

  • but they have one of these Missile Command cabarets

  • and I had never seen one in this form factor before,

  • and I just saw it and fell in love.

  • You know, it's still the proper height in terms of

  • like, for an adult, so I can just be right here

  • and I'm just under six feet tall, so it's fine for that.

  • You just kinda have to look down

  • instead of looking straight forward, in a way.

  • I think it's a good trade-off for what I'm getting

  • and for what I want, and really I don't have a big house.

  • This is a, like, 800 square foot house, I think

  • so I don't even know where I'm gonna put it yet.

  • [storage-conscious chuckling]

  • I've got not a lot of room right here

  • but it's just here for the moment, I'll find somewhere.

  • Actually thinking about redoing my living room,

  • so I'll probably take it in there and mess around

  • and do that, or, who knows.

  • I'll figure something out.

  • I will sleep with this thing if I have to,

  • I will sleep with you!

  • Let's look inside here really quick,

  • cuz I think this is fascinating.

  • I've always loved coin mechanisms,

  • and the fact that this one works, for the most part,

  • [light chuckling] is pretty great!

  • Player two one here doesn't, really,

  • but this one totally works.

  • [coin mechanism clanking]

  • [thunks onto floor]

  • Yep, so that one pretty much works.

  • [clunk]

  • This goes down there into the coin tray

  • or box, or whatever, I don't really know the terminology.

  • [chuckles]

  • I'd like to find an original tray and get that going,

  • but man, everything in here is pretty much original

  • as far as I know.

  • That was another reason that attracted me to it.

  • It hadn't been modified, it doesn't have a bootleg board.

  • I've ordered one of those kits that lets me play

  • Super Missile Attack on here, too.

  • It just sort of plugs in on top of the 6502,

  • sort of a daughterboard thing.

  • Right in the middle there, got some dip switches,

  • and there's some back there, too,

  • and those will allow me to set it on free play if you want,

  • but right now, it's just taking quarters.

  • [fiddling with key lock] [groans of inadequacy]

  • I mean, I'm gonna keep the woodgrain I think,

  • even though it's a little bit screwed here and there.

  • There's definitely some spots missing,

  • in fact, right back here is pretty janked.

  • That's unfortunate, but that's also

  • pretty commonplace on these things.

  • There's also this sort of darkened glass here,

  • I guess it's plexi.

  • I'm not sure if there's supposed to be,

  • like, an overlay on top of that?

  • I've seen some of them that do have it.

  • I know the upright cabinet does, but I don't even know.

  • Here's the other thing, it also came with

  • some nice little service manuals

  • and operation things and all this.

  • This is handy, a whole bunch of schematics and whatnot.

  • Also has 14 inch color TV monitor, yes.

  • It is the original monitor in there.

  • In fact, there's a little bit of burn-in.

  • I've already gone through a few of these.

  • These PCB's were for the trackball.

  • You got these little optical sensors on there,

  • and all three of these were like, dead,

  • and when I was picking this up at Joe's,

  • it was not working right on the x-axis.

  • It would work fine going left, but not right.

  • Up and down was pretty much perfect on the y-axis, but yeah.

  • So we replaced the bearings, and swapped these out,

  • and [laughs] one thing after another, man.

  • We were trying all sorts of things.

  • Cleaning them, trying different versions of it

  • and, you know, lubing things, and switching out.

  • Like the whole trackball had been rebuilt already,

  • he already did that before I got it, but anyway.

  • Eh, let's go ahead and play a round.