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  • [jazz music jazzing away]

  • Greetings, and welcome to

  • an LGR thing about Missile Command!

  • And in particular it is my version

  • of Missile Command that I have here:

  • the Cabaret Cabinet Edition by Atari in 1980.

  • Now, this was my first arcade machine

  • that I have ever bought.

  • And as of now, it's still the only one

  • that I own, but yeah, it's awesome.

  • It's an all-time classic,

  • one of my favorites,

  • and it's the Cabaret Cabinet Edition.

  • You know, it's a little bit shorter

  • but still, you know, more or less full-sized.

  • Totally playable, and it has these

  • really cool wood grain on the sides,

  • and dude, it's just a really awesome cabinet.

  • I did a video about it when I bought it

  • in the summer of 2019, so you can see that

  • if you'd like to see a little bit more

  • of just my overview of the cabinet,

  • how I got it, and what had been done to it to fix it up.

  • The trackball problems

  • and some of the board and monitor issues that I had.

  • It was pretty much all sorted when I got it

  • but there were still some things

  • about this particular cabinet that

  • I wanted to improve, and personalize,

  • and upgrade.

  • And that's what this video

  • is going to be about here.

  • So, as mentioned in the previous video

  • about this cabinet, there were some things

  • that I wanted to address

  • down in the coin door area.

  • While you can play this on free-play

  • and that's how it was set when I got it,

  • I really like the idea of inserting my own

  • quarters and credits and stuff

  • into the actual coin slots to play the game.

  • I don't know, it just, it rings more true

  • to me as an arcade experience.

  • But the coin mechanisms themselves

  • had all sorts of issues,

  • like they just weren't accepting coins

  • reliably at all, and the red coin reject buttons

  • they were kind of sticking, and the door

  • down in the little bottom right there,

  • that little flappy thing, was sticking as well.

  • Not only that, but I had no way of

  • saving high scores on the machine

  • and yeah that's an original feature

  • I suppose you could say,

  • these machines didn't come with

  • battery-backed saving or chips that allowed

  • memory to remember anything after you turned it off

  • or unplugged it.

  • It would just lose all your high scores.

  • But there are modern ways to get around that,

  • upgrade this. And that is one of the very first

  • things that I bought, was this little PCB

  • from Braze Technologies.

  • It's called the

  • Missile Command Multigame and High Score Save Kit.

  • And really it's just a little board

  • that goes between the 6502 Processor

  • on the Missile Command motherboard

  • and it adds the ability to save high scores

  • whenever it's powered off.

  • As well, as a bit of a nice bonus feature

  • in the fact that it also allows you to

  • switch over and play Super Missile Attack

  • whenever you want.

  • Which is a 1981 enhancement kit,

  • kind of ROM hack conversion

  • by General Computer Corporation

  • just like a more difficult version

  • of Missile Command. The main reason I wanted it

  • was the high score saving ability.

  • Just need to grab the key to the rear of the machine,

  • there's a wooden door panel thing

  • that comes off so you can access

  • the PCB and other internals.

  • And what we need to get to is

  • all the way in the bottom left,

  • like near the very front of the

  • Missile Command Cabinet, that is the 6502 Processor

  • and in order to reach that, it's thankfully very easy

  • to get the boards out of these machines.

  • Really in my case it's just a matter of

  • removing the wiring harness and

  • one screw on the top here,

  • and then just sliding the entire board forward

  • and there we go, I can now reach the CPU

  • and pull that out with a IC Puller.

  • Yeah look at that!

  • Classic 6502A Microprocessor, good stuff.

  • And, yeah, it's just a matter of

  • lining up the little notch on the board

  • and the CPU

  • and plugging it in right here

  • and then sticking that back into

  • the Missile Command main PCB

  • in the same direction as the

  • CPU would have been before.

  • That's it! That is all that is involved

  • with these kinds of upgrade kits

  • it's a very easy mod and there's a bunch of systems

  • that Braze Technologies and I'm sure other people

  • make these for. It's really cool stuff.

  • And there we go! Got the system powered back on.

  • So far so good, in fact it looks exactly the same

  • up to this point, but then if you press

  • the START 1 and START 2 buttons at the same time

  • you can switch over to Super Missile Attack

  • and play that version of the game instead

  • of the original Missile Command.

  • You know, again, I really just bought this

  • for the High Score saving ability

  • but it's cool to have this option

  • to play something a little bit different

  • from time to time, although this is

  • much more punishing, to just downright difficult

  • than even the original Missile Command.

  • So this absolutely destroys me.

  • Every single time.

  • Wow.

  • [Buzzing missile destruction sounds]

  • If you're like one of those crazy marathon players

  • and you can play it for infinity

  • then maybe you'll be able to have more of a challenge

  • out of this, but for me it's just punishing

  • so I pretty much never play it.

  • Anyway, I am happy to have the

  • High Score saving ability on the

  • regular Missile Command game.

  • That was enough for me!

  • But with that out of the way,

  • the next order of business was to address

  • some of the coin door and coin area issues

  • and just little things that I wanted to tweak

  • and make better and, [laughs] Actually,

  • one of the first things that I did

  • was I dropped 800 quarters into the coin tray.

  • [laughs] Yeah, okay.

  • So the reason that I did this was very simple.

  • When you dropped quarters into this thing

  • they were just plunking down on this plastic tray

  • and it sounded stupid.

  • You know when I was playing arcade games as a kid

  • I always liked that satisfying sound

  • of the quarter or the credit just dropping

  • into the machine, and "clink" it just,

  • ah, you know, the metallic coins up against coins.

  • So a quick and easy way to get around that

  • you know, just make it sound a little more awesome

  • was to drop a lot of my own quarters in there.

  • So I just went to the bank,

  • withdrew some quarters, and put 'em in there.

  • Yeah, it sounds much more legit now

  • when dropping quarters in

  • [satisfying clink]

  • Yeah, but whatever. That's just a silly thing.

  • The main real thing that I wanted to address

  • with this coin door

  • were the mechanisms themselves.

  • And as you can see, the little red reject buttons

  • stick in place, not that there's much reason

  • to press them in, this machine

  • doesn't actually reject coins,

  • but the fact that you could press them

  • and they got stuck annoyed me.

  • Anyhow these flappy doors at the bottom

  • were getting stuck,

  • and just inserting quarters to begin with