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  • The OnePlus 5T has survived my durability test, and it's time for the teardown.

  • I review technology from the inside.

  • It'll be interesting to see if OnePlus had added any unadvertised water resistance to

  • their newest flagship.

  • Let's get started.

  • [Intro]

  • At the bottom of the phone there are two tiny screws.

  • My pentalobe screwdriver did work for this, but I think the actual bit is a T2.

  • Just make sure not to strip the screws.

  • The SIM card tray does come out at this point as well.

  • This time it is mandatory.

  • Now, lifting off the screen is pretty difficult.

  • I feel like the 5T is much tighter than the previous OnePlus 5.

  • I am using a thin metal pry tool to get between the plastic edge of the screen and the metal

  • edge of the phone.

  • There is no adhesive holding the screen down, but the clasps are extremely tight.

  • So as you get one up and out, the rest of them get pinched in harder, making the screen

  • difficult to remove.

  • But the good news is is that the screen is attached to the pretty solid mid-frame which

  • gives it stability, and also includes the motherboard and battery.

  • So the whole thing lifts up and out as one unit, leaving the back panel and charging

  • port behind.

  • This also exposes the totally not red battery.

  • Kind of disappointing, but maybe next year OnePlus will go back to the cool looking insides

  • they used to have.

  • We can always hope.

  • The back of the phone is still attached with two ribbons: the first is for the ceramic

  • fingerprint scanner.

  • I'll unplug that ribbon like a little Lego and then fold over the back panel so I can

  • unplug the battery and charging port ribbons.

  • Both of these ribbons are hidden under a metal latch.

  • I did remove the screw next to the latch, but it's actually a new screwless designit

  • just unclips with a little leverage.

  • Interesting.

  • I'll unplug the battery connection first, and then the charging port ribbon.

  • This allows the back panel to be completely removed from the phone.

  • This metal panel has the fingerprint scanner and a bunch of gold contact pads for the antennas

  • and button connections.

  • We'll talk more about the charging port and headphone jack components in a second, but

  • first, let's remove the battery.

  • I remove one little screws at the bottom right of the motherboard and then unclip the metal

  • bracket over the extension ribbon and fold it back away from the battery.

  • Then I can grab the green pull tab at the right side of the battery and it was refreshingly

  • easy to remove.

  • Not much force is holding it in place, making this a pretty simple repair.

  • The battery is a 3300 milliamp hour, and it also says it's not removable.

  • Oops.

  • The loud speaker in side the OnePlus 5T is held in place by 6 normal Phillips head screws.

  • The loudspeaker then pulls away, revealing a circular vibration motor and the other side

  • of the extension ribbon cable.

  • The dual cameras are up here at the top of the phone.

  • The connectors are held down by yet another metal bracket and one silver screw.

  • Then both cameras can unplug and come away from the phone.

  • Now, neither of these lenses have optical image stabilization.

  • Both have the same focal point as well, meaning there is no wide angle or telephoto lenses,

  • just the normal portrait mode.

  • I do kind of wish the camera had a few extra perks to it, like that OIS or telephoto.

  • They are pretty important, but it is what it is.

  • There are 6 silver screws holding down what's left of the motherboard.

  • I'll remove those and set them off to the side in an organized fashion and unclip the

  • black signal wire from the edge of the board.

  • This allows the whole thing to pull away from the phone body.

  • Even though the OnePlus 5T has a flagship grade, Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 processor inside,

  • it does not have any kind of copper heat pipe or thermal cooling system like other flagships

  • have.

  • The difference in performance and lifespan will probably be negligible, but sometimes

  • those little details do matter in the long run.

  • The front facing camera does not have OIS either, but most smartphones don't.

  • The screen is still attached to the mid-frame at this point, and if the screen does need

  • to be replaced, I would use heat to soften the adhesive between the two layers and pull

  • them apart... a lot of heat.

  • But that also destroys the screen and I want my phone to still work when I put it back

  • together.

  • Only do that if your screen is unsalvageable.

  • I'll link all the replacement parts and tools in the video description.

  • The buttons, like the volume and power are also attached to the mid-frame, so just make

  • sure that the new screen has all the parts you need from your old screen before you put

  • it back together.

  • I'll set the motherboard back down into the frame and get those 6 screws screwed back

  • in to hold it down.

  • And then set the dual camera unit into it's slot and plug both of them in with the silver

  • metal bracket holding it all down.

  • The signal wire gets plugged in and then we'll mosey on down to the loudspeaker.

  • I'll plug in the extension ribbon cable first and then secure the whole thing in place with

  • the 6 silver screws.

  • Now as far as waterproofing this phone goes, OnePlus did not talk about any IP ratings

  • for the 5T.

  • But it looks like they were playing with the idea of including an IP water resistance rating

  • in the future.

  • The phone does have a mesh screen protecting the insides of the loudspeaker from water.

  • Plus the USB-C charging port has it's own red rubber ring around the tip.

  • This could be for water resistance or shock absorption from plugging and unplugging the

  • charging cable every day.

  • Either way, rubber is a good thing.

  • At least something inside the phone is red.

  • Thumbs up for that.

  • The inside of the frame does have foam running around the entire edge and this is probably

  • to keep things tight with no squeaks or sounds.

  • There is no tackiness or adhesive element to it, so it's not for water resistance.

  • So even though it looks like OnePlus is thinking about water resistance in the future, definitely

  • don't trust anything yet.

  • I'll tuck the boring yellow battery into the frame and then plug in the extension ribbon

  • cable over the top and protect it with that metal bracket and bottom right screw on the

  • motherboard.

  • The charging port is next.

  • I'll clip that right by the battery, which plugs in last.

  • And the whole thing is held down by the last metal latch and the final screw.

  • The fingerprint scanner gets plugged in and then the whole contraption can fold over back

  • on top of the phone.

  • The screen is mostly held in place by friction and the metal tabs around the side, but I'm

  • being careful not to apply too much pressure because glass is still glass, and too much

  • pressure can break it, which would be pretty unfortunate at this stage of the game.

  • Lucky for me though, the whole thing still turns on.

  • I'll add those final two bottom T2 screws and call it a success.

  • The OnePlus 5T might be hard to get inside of initially, but it's pretty repairable once

  • you get in there.

  • If you haven't seen the durability test of the OnePlus 5T, go check that out.

  • And make sure to follow me over on Twitterwe have a good time over there.

  • Thanks a ton for watching.

  • And I'll see you around.

The OnePlus 5T has survived my durability test, and it's time for the teardown.

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OnePlus 5T Teardown! - Hidden water resistance?

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/03/06
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