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  • [light jazz music]

  • - Greetings, and welcome to an LGR Q and A thing!

  • And yeah, this is a reward tier

  • on the LGR Patreon page.

  • So people that have signed up for that

  • get to ask me questions

  • and I'm gonna answer them,

  • or at least the best of my ability

  • and the ones that I can answer,

  • not like 'yes or no' ones.

  • This is also the computer

  • that I recently put together,

  • that we're gonna be using.

  • This is the NuXT Turbo clone PC thing,

  • which is really awesome, and I don't know,

  • I just wanted to use it,

  • so that's what we're gonna be doing here.

  • And yeah, first question,

  • let's just go ahead and get to it.

  • This is from Greg Thomson.

  • "Over the course of 10 years,

  • "has the process of creating videos become easier

  • "with regards to script writing, filming,

  • "editing, and overall workflow?"

  • No. [confident chuckle]

  • It's gotten harder.

  • Absolutely, because I keep upping my game, so to speak.

  • Better cameras, microphones, lighting,

  • editing, and all sorts of effects and stuff

  • that I didn't normally do.

  • And really, just the whole thing

  • is way harder than it ever was before,

  • and that's totally my own fault.

  • But, I think the results are worth it.

  • 13Cubed asks, "What's involved in the production

  • "of a typical LGR episode?

  • "How much time is spent writing scripts,

  • filming, editing, et cetera?"

  • Well, all those things you just mentioned

  • are involved in the production.

  • Other than that, I mean, yeah,

  • I could probably do like a making of video at some point.

  • I kinda did awhile back, and it was just like a time lapse.

  • It wasn't too involved, and I also might

  • want to do a video about equipment,

  • 'cause people ask me about that all the time.

  • But yeah, how much time is spent?

  • It depends, you know, anywhere from 20 hours

  • for a really easy video,

  • or even less for something like this,

  • all the way up to 60, 70, 80, who knows how many hours

  • because sometimes videos are just spread out

  • over a course of months or years, or who knows?

  • Alon Eiton asks, "How do you come up

  • "with the topics for your videos?"

  • A mixture of stumbling around the rabbit holes

  • of the internet, and late night eBay searches.

  • And yeah, just whatever I'm feeling

  • on any given day of the week.

  • It changes week to week, you know.

  • Sometimes I'm feeling like an Oddware episode,

  • or putting together a Tech Tales,

  • or maybe I've got something I want to build or repair

  • and that's just been sitting around for awhile,

  • or enough footage comes together for Thrifts

  • and it's like okay, I may as well edit that this week.

  • It just depends.

  • Honestly, I have no system. No system whatsoever.

  • Starkindler Studio asks,

  • "What is your favorite segment/content to make?

  • "The stuff that makes you feel super accomplished

  • "getting done, regardless of views or revenue?"

  • Definitely "LGR Tech Tales", no question there.

  • It's just that has the most research and the most detail,

  • and a lot of little things that have to come together

  • to make a cohesive-looking video.

  • Finding the right imagery and newspaper articles,

  • and magazines, and screenshots, and video.

  • Yeah, it's just a really rewarding thing to put together,

  • and I wish that I had more time to do more of them.

  • Logan King asks, "A lot of your videos

  • "seem to have really long lead times nowadays,

  • "where you have to track down a specific version

  • "of some software from 25 years ago

  • "to even see if the hardware you bought works.

  • "How do you keep track of all the things?"

  • Lists, mostly.

  • Writing things down, putting it in calendars,

  • setting reminders for myself on my phone

  • or computer or whatever.

  • Yeah, just basic organizational stuff.

  • And also I have a shelving unit over there

  • full of other LGR projects that are in the works.

  • So every time I see it, I feel shame and pressure.

  • [shameful pressurize silence]

  • That helps.

  • Putte H asks,

  • "Which of your computers are you most proud of?"

  • Well, recently, I'm really proud of the NuXT here,

  • or the "NuXT Cube," as you all have started calling it,

  • which is actually quite clever. I wish I had thought of that.

  • But anyway, yeah, the NuXT Cube.

  • I like this, but I also like, you know,

  • the Woodgrain 486, and things that I've done repairs on,

  • and augmented with other parts.

  • You know, any time there's like blood, sweat,

  • and tears going into a project,

  • it makes it more special, so yeah.

  • Generally I guess I'm most proud of whatever

  • I've worked on most recently.

  • Chris asks, "Why woodgrain?

  • "Or more specifically, what originally made you

  • "interested in that aesthetic?"

  • I guess it probably comes from growing up around it.

  • I had a lot of wood paneling and stuff at home,

  • and grandparents, and everybody's houses had it.

  • There was woodgrain everywhere.

  • So anyway, there's a nostalgia factor.

  • But beyond that, I don't know,

  • I just like the way it looks.

  • I like natural textures on things.

  • I love original, natural wood, that actually comes from trees.

  • As much as I like veneers and vinyls and stuff,

  • those tend to have repeating patterns,

  • but when you don't see that so obviously,

  • and it's cut from different parts of the tree,

  • that looks really cool.

  • [laughs]

  • I don't know, I just like woodgrain.

  • However, I don't like it on everything.

  • You know, that's another thing that some people

  • seem to get sort of misconstrued.

  • I just like it on certain things.

  • Mostly electronics, especially up against brushed metals.

  • Brushed nickel and wood look great,

  • or a nice walnut with a flat matte black

  • kind of textured finish look great.

  • I like certain things. I like woodgrain.

  • That's how it goes.

  • Here's a question from a bunch of people.

  • It was all kind of similar, so I put it together.

  • From JoeBoxr, Adult Sword Owner, Rob Caporetto,

  • and Dave Langley, "What's your collecting holy grail?

  • "What hardware have you sought out but just can't find?

  • "If money, space, availability were no object,

  • "what would you get?"

  • Well, if nothing at all was any object,

  • I'd probably get something crazy, huge, historical

  • monstrosity, like a '60s IBM mainframe or something.

  • But, I don't even know if I'd really want that,

  • because what would I do with it, and what in the world?

  • [laughs]

  • But yeah, actual personal holy grails

  • or machines that I had as a kid,

  • more specifically the machine that I had as a kid,

  • like an old Packard Bell or the Acer or something.

  • But they're long gone, you know.

  • They were either trashed or just gotten rid of in some way,

  • and I can never find them again

  • 'cause that was an exact machine.

  • Even if I find the exact same model,

  • it'll never be the same computer.

  • My goal holy grail are machines

  • that genuinely no longer exist.

  • Will Herrman asks, "What do you think

  • "is the future of Edutainment software,

  • "especially considering how most children

  • "use phones and tablets instead of PCs?"

  • I don't know, I'd say I'm pretty hopeful

  • about the future of Edutainment.

  • I mean, admittedly I'm not in that world,

  • I don't have kids,

  • I'm not lookin' up tablet Edutainment software.

  • But I do know that kids nowadays

  • are way more tech savvy than I was

  • at earlier ages than ever

  • and they've got access to more and more stuff.

  • So hopefully that