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  • This might look like your normal old school, brick style, cellphone, but you're wrong.

  • It's a full-fledged texting machine with a massive expandable full sized keyboard...released

  • in 2004.

  • The Nokia 6800 was the first cellphone I ever owned and I loved it.

  • I think we should open it up and see what it looks like from the inside.

  • Let's get started.

  • [Intro]

  • Back when I was in high school, cellphones were just starting to get popular.

  • Even at 16, most of my friends didn't have one yet since they were pretty expensive.

  • One of my first purchases after getting a job delivering pizzas was buying this cellphone

  • and a monthly cellphone plan.

  • Text messages weren't unlimited back then like they are now.

  • I had 300 text messages to send throughout the month and I would keep track of them to

  • make sure I wasn't sending more than 30 a day.

  • Those things were special.

  • With a keyboard like this though, how could you not constantly be texting?

  • It's even back-lit This phone was ahead of it's time for sure.

  • The Nokia 6800 had all the latest and greatest features: messaging, a 10 number call history,

  • a note taking app.

  • It even had games – 2 of them.

  • Bounce was a good one.

  • The 1.7 inch CSTN display was a passive LCD matrix instead of a more modern, active LCD

  • matrix.

  • So there was considerable ghosting and a slow response time.

  • Not quite as good as the ROG or Razer Phone 2.

  • It does have a calculator though.

  • The full size keyboard is the main selling point.

  • Flipping the phone in half allowed me to bypass the normal T9 texting of my inferior peers

  • and get both thumbs rocking at full speed, while I enjoyed each of my 300 text messages

  • every month.

  • Definitely got all the ladies with this one.

  • Mohs scale of hardness wasn't one of my main concerns at the time.

  • Although a little scratch on my 2004 flagship probably would have bothered me quite a bit.

  • I did get over that fear eventually.

  • The screen is made from plastic, meaning that it can get scratched by basically anything

  • in your pocket.

  • In fact, the whole thing is made from plastic, just like every other phone back then.

  • It never crossed my mind to take my phone apart.

  • Back in 2004, YouTube wasn't a thing back then.

  • But it is now, so here we are.

  • The information under the battery acts like a warranty void sticker, yet doesn't hide

  • any screws.

  • The Nokia 6800 has just 2 T6 screws down at the bottom, and then the two halves can just

  • unclasp, using my plastic pry tool along the sides.

  • Then the whole phone can come apart, revealing some pretty sweet stuff.

  • The keypad is pretty typical of older phonesjust a plastic sheet resting on top of

  • each individual button.

  • This phone just has a full keypad worth of those buttons.

  • The frame itself is pretty interesting.

  • The flip portion is connected with a springy hinge, which I'll show more of in just a second.

  • The flat portion has little gold contact pads that transfer information from whatever position

  • the keyboard flap is in.

  • The gold just rests up against the motherboard inside the phone, just like we see loudspeakers

  • doing in modern phones nowadays.

  • Thumbs up for that.

  • There are 5 additional screws holding the motherboard into the frame of the phone.

  • Then the whole thing including the screen can pull out, exposing the old school heat

  • shield, Faraday cage looking things on the back of the motherboard.

  • The same kind of thing we found inside the indestructible Nokia 3310.

  • The phone does still work when the battery's held in place.

  • Look at these LED lights on the keypad.

  • It's not actually a back-lit keypad, just well placed singular LED lights that are supposed

  • to light up the whole thing.

  • Might be why it was a big dimmer than we're used to nowadays.

  • Down here at the bottom, below the clear plastic LED keypad light redirector, we get the proprietary

  • headphone jack.

  • Yep, this long golden contact pad looking thing was the headphone jack.

  • The circular 3.5 hole was actually for the phone charger.

  • Times were different.

  • The micro USB standard wasn't introduced until 2007, and the USB-C standard we use nowadays

  • was more 2014.

  • A universal charging method is a very good thing.

  • The vibrator motor is also down here, supported in the white rubber sheath.

  • It spins the eccentric rotating mass around really fast to produce the vibrating effect.

  • I used this phone for about 2 years before switching over to my first camera phone: the

  • Sony Ericsson K608i.

  • And then finally getting my first smartphone, a Blackberry Pearl, in 2009.

  • I'll slap the two halves of the phone back together, making sure I didn't install the

  • keyboard flap completely backwards, because that would be super embarrassing.

  • While I'm back in here again though, check out the spring hinge.

  • As the keyboard flips up to rest against the top of the phone, the springs allow the hinge

  • to flex up and then pulls the whole flap tight again back against the phone body with the

  • 4 springs in each of these little squares.

  • Pretty smart.

  • Anyway, the phone is back together again.

  • Pretty easy teardown.

  • It was nice back when things weren't always glued shut, and everything had removable batteries

  • with easy access screws and could be taken apart in minutes instead of hours.

  • What was your first phone, and how old were you when you got it?

  • I'm curious.

  • Hit that subscribe button if you haven't already.

  • And come hang out with me on Instagram.

  • Thanks a ton for watching, and I'll see you around.

This might look like your normal old school, brick style, cellphone, but you're wrong.

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B1 keyboard nokia cellphone flap texting hinge

The Coolest Phone I Ever Owned...

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/03/06
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