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  • -I think because Vermont is so small,

  • it takes a different kind of candidate to do well here.

  • You really need to go out there and meet a lot of the people

  • who are going to vote for or against you.

  • We tend to produce candidates

  • who may be a little bit rough around the edges

  • but have that personal touch.

  • -Bernie Sanders seemed to come out of nowhere in 2015.

  • He was an obscure senator from a small state.

  • And he shouted a lot.

  • -You want to share it with the American people!

  • -But people were listening.

  • -Bernie Sanders is the person

  • I've been looking for all my life.

  • -I just like how he doesn't lie.

  • He tells the truth, and he's just about the issues.

  • He's not playing a political game.

  • -People were making fun of me last summer,

  • "He's not gonna make it."

  • Look, here we are now, this summer.

  • We're going.

  • -For David Zuckerman, it brought back old memories.

  • -Bernie first inspired me as a cynical college student

  • back in the early '90s.

  • I thought that the corporate money in politics,

  • that the two parties and the power structure

  • was something I didn't want to get involved in.

  • -But thanks to Sanders, Zuckerman did get involved.

  • He's now Vermont's lieutenant governor.

  • -I was incredibly impressed with what he did a few years ago

  • where basically that inspiration for me I saw happen

  • with millions of people all across the country.

  • -For many Americans, it felt like Sanders

  • had a fresh and urgent message.

  • But it was the same message he'd been running on for 40 years.

  • -What we talk about is the fact that in our society,

  • theoretically a democratic society,

  • you have a handful of people who control our economy.

  • In the United States today,

  • we have the most unequal distribution of income

  • and wealth of any major country on earth.

  • -When Sanders was elected mayor of Burlington in 1981,

  • it got national attention.

  • -Face it, you don't find too many socialists

  • in elective office in this country,

  • and one is elected mayor of a sizable city, well, that's news.

  • -You try to make the story, you know, Communist takeover.

  • I said, "No, no, not at all."

  • -Garrison Nelson has known Sanders

  • since his earliest days in politics.

  • He says Sanders may have talked like a radical,

  • but he didn't govern like one.

  • -There's no five-year plan.

  • There's no collectivize agriculture.

  • There's no nationalizing, you know, of industry.

  • Every rich person in Burlington remained rich.

  • You know, no, they weren't driven out of the city

  • by the lefty mayor.

  • -Already gone through and been approved.

  • -No, Senate's not in.

  • -Bob Kinzel is one of Vermont's most well-known journalists.

  • He's covered Sanders for decades.

  • -Bernie's got a lot of philosophical ideas

  • that are quite broad and wide-ranging.

  • And people say, "Can he compromise?

  • Can he work with people?

  • Can he work with the business community?"

  • And as mayor, he showed he could.

  • -What is the history of this problem?

  • How long has this problem gone on?

  • Is it worse today than it was 20 years ago or what?

  • -Well, the problem has almost gone on forever.

  • As long as Burlington has had a sewer system,

  • which probably dates from about the middle of the 1800s,

  • we've been dumping it in the lake.

  • -Now, if you look at the old waterfront,

  • you had these big oil tanks out in the water,

  • and the place was just a mess.

  • And he worked with the business community to say,

  • "Let's make the waterfront sort of the jewel of Burlington."

  • -Sanders also increased funding for the arts

  • during his four terms as mayor.

  • -So you had this sort of synergy of lefty politics

  • and then, you know, artists and musicians,

  • and the city just became just vibrant,

  • sort of mini mecca here in the woods of New England.

  • -Bernie Sanders. It's time for change.

  • -In 1990, Sanders ran for the House of Representatives

  • as a member of the independent party, and he won.

  • In 2006, Vermonters made him a senator.

  • He spent much of his time in Washington as an outsider,

  • a third-party politician in a two-party town

  • and a champion of progressive policies at a time

  • when Democrats were moving to the center.

  • -As an independent,

  • I have problems with the Democrats' bill.

  • It does not go anywhere near far enough.

  • Let me describe very briefly how, with a single-payer system,

  • we can provide quality healthcare

  • to every man, woman, and child in this country.

  • We should be clear that a war

  • and a long-term American occupation of Iraq

  • could be extremely expensive.

  • Does anybody in America

  • really think that the problem in this institution now

  • is that working people and poor people have too much power?

  • -If you keep pushing further and further to the left,

  • you start to drag the middle in that direction,

  • and I think that's been his way

  • of operating throughout his legislative career.

  • -Sanders has sponsored more than 400 bills

  • during his nearly 30 years in Congress.

  • But only seven of those bills were passed into law.

  • One protected a Vermont mountain range.

  • Another codified a water-sharing agreement

  • with neighboring New Hampshire.

  • Two of the bills expanded government support for veterans,

  • while two others simply renamed Vermont post offices.

  • -He hasn't done squat for anybody.

  • -Rob Roper leads a free-market think tank in Vermont.

  • -Are there more jobs in Vermont?

  • Are there higher-paying jobs in Vermont

  • as the result of him having been in office?

  • -Sanders may have little to show for his decades in Congress,

  • but he has remained Vermont's most popular politician.

  • -Bernie Sanders is a bulldog for what he believes in.

  • -What's fascinating about Bernie is that,

  • yes, he has progressive voters, yes, he has liberal voters,

  • but he also has some very conservative Republican voters.

  • He can go up to the Northeast Kingdom,

  • the most rural part of Vermont, and people will go,

  • "Give 'em hell, Bernie."

  • -Chris Pearson saw it firsthand

  • as a campaign volunteer in the '90s.

  • -Aye. -Now he's a state senator.

  • -I had only actually been with Bernie

  • a few times at this point, and I'll never forget this.

  • This guy walks up, kind of working-class guy, says,

  • "Bernie, I disagree with you on just about everything,

  • and I vote for you every time."

  • And I'm looking at Bernie like,

  • "Wow, how's he gonna answer this?"

  • And Bernie says very frankly, says, "Why?"

  • And the guy says, "I know right where you stand.

  • These other guys, I don't have a clue."

  • -Consistency may be a strength for Sanders, but he may need

  • more than that to stand out in a crowded Democratic field.

  • -Given that there are so many choices,

  • it's been more challenging for him

  • to not only grow his pool of support,

  • but to expand it, as well.

  • -We need a lot of buses to get to Washington.

  • -And though he can certainly electrify a crowd,

  • he often struggles to connect with people one-on-one.

  • -When it comes to him on the campaign trail,

  • he does not tend to interact on a one-on-one level

  • with a lot of voters the way that some other candidates do.

  • -Hi, Senator. -Hey, Nick.

  • -How are you? -Good.

  • -Some Democrats I've talked to say, "Look, Democrats

  • want to know their candidates.

  • They want to see them.

  • They want to talk to them up close."

  • So that could be one of the challenges that he faces

  • as he tries to grow support.

  • -Communities devastated, the jobs moved overseas.

  • -The Sanders campaign is different this time around.

  • -Real change never takes place from the top on down.

  • -More professional and better organized than it was in 2016.

  • But the man at the center is likely to keep doing

  • what he's always done.

  • -So much of the money is going into the war effort

  • and into the military that we don't have enough money

  • to build all the housing that we want built.

  • -When you hear him speak,

  • you are really getting Sanders himself.

  • He's famous for scrawling out his speeches

  • on his yellow notepad.

  • He's been doing that for decades.

  • And, you know, you can have consultants

  • and you can have pollsters telling him what to do,

  • but he's probably not gonna listen.

  • -Oh, who said they like coke? -Me.

  • -You tell me about that. -I like Coca-Cola.

  • -Oh, Coca-Cola.

  • Alright, but who knows about cocaine?

  • Anyone ever seen cocaine?

  • -Yes. No.

  • -Yes. -Alright.

  • Hold it. One at a time.

  • What about cocaine? Good thing, bad thing, what?

  • -Bad. -Bad.

  • -Why is it bad?

  • -Because it has a bad effect on the body.

  • -That's right.

  • Do you know people who take drugs?

  • -No.

  • -You don't have to tell me who, but I bet you do.

-I think because Vermont is so small,

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The political journey of Bernie Sanders

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/03/05
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