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  • Since he first appeared on the big screen in 1962, James Bond has become a worldwide

  • film sensation.

  • "Bond.

  • James Bond."

  • With 24 "official" James Bond adventures and three "unofficial" films, the franchise can

  • be a bit overwhelming, especially if you're new to the series.

  • Some of these movies remain classics today, while othersnot so much.

  • Let's take a look at every James Bond film ever made, and rank them from worst to best.

  • Chances are good this list will leave you shaken and stirred...

  • Casino Royale (1967)

  • Due to some behind-the-scenes drama, producer Charles Feldman opted to make his version

  • of Casino Royale a satire, casting comedic actor Peter Sellers as one of many James Bonds

  • it gets complicatedand Orson Welles as Le Chiffre.

  • Despite being a spoof, 1967's Casino Royale is more cheesy and cringe-inducing than actually

  • funny, and can easily be skipped on your next Bond-a-thon.

  • "This is an historic day in our saga Sir James.

  • The day SMUSH finally eliminated the original James Bond."

  • A View to a Kill (1985)

  • Roger Moore's final appearance as James Bond in A View to a Kill is by far his weakest.

  • Moore delivers a performance that could be described as zombie-like, dozing his way through

  • nearly every scene.

  • Making matters worse, the plot is nearly non-existent.

  • It centers on a Silicon Valley magnate played by Christopher Walken who wants to control

  • the market for computer chips.

  • And although Walken and his henchwoman, played by Grace Jones, do a fine job with what they

  • were given, their performances couldn't redeem this movie.

  • "So, does anybody else wanna drop out?"

  • The Man with the Golden Gun (1974)

  • Roger Moore's second outing as Bond in The Man with the Golden Gun was also pretty shabby.

  • The movie tries too hard to be flashy, and nearly everything overshadows Moore himself.

  • The kung-fu scenes seem cheesy and tacked on, and there's a decided lack of typical

  • Bond spy gadgetryreplaced with impossibilities like flying cars.

  • On the plus side, the movie does offer two of the coolest "bad guys" of the series: Christopher

  • Lee as Scaramanga and Hervé Villechaize as his henchman, Nick Nack.

  • Octopussy (1983)

  • Director John Glen resorted to a tired formula for Octopussy.

  • Of all the Roger Moore Bond films, this one might just be the cheesiest.

  • Featuring jewelry heists, a cult, and a world domination storyline involving nuclear weapons,

  • Octopussy suffers from an overabundance of plot and an underwhelming lack of substance.

  • And remember Bond's ridiculous disguises in the movie?

  • How could you forget.

  • Casino Royale (1954)

  • James Bond might be a movie icon, but his first on-screen appearance was actually on

  • television.

  • In 1954, Casino Royale was produced as an episode of the CBS anthology drama called

  • Climax!

  • Which was actually performed and broadcast live.

  • Starring Barry Nelson as Bond and Peter Lorre as Le Chiffre, the episode was mostly faithful

  • to the novel, except that Bond is an American CIA agent instead of MI6.

  • It's not a terrible take on the stories, per se, but it doesn't have the production value

  • of its peers.

  • That said, it's still pretty impressive that they pulled it off in front of a live audience

  • at all.

  • Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)

  • Pierce Brosnan's second outing as James Bond was the same suave and smooth double-oh agent

  • we'd come to know in GoldenEye, and his onscreen chemistry with Teri Hatcher steams up every

  • scene they share.

  • Also, Jonathan Pryce presents a much more realistic villain than normal: a media mogul

  • who attempts to start a war in order to boost his news market share.

  • "I may have some breaking news for you, Elliott."

  • However, despite the shiny exterior and new arsenal of gadgets, there's very little new

  • ground explored in Tomorrow Never Dies, and it plays a little too safe to stand out in

  • the series.

  • The World Is Not Enough (1999)

  • Brosnan's Bond outings might've all been good in terms of his personality, but there is

  • still way too much formula in play with The World is Not Enough.

  • And while most of the supporting cast was solidincluding Sohie Marceau as Elektra

  • King and Robert Carlyle as Renardthe overall acting of the pic took a major hit

  • with Denise Richards' portrayal of nuclear physicist Christmas Jones.

  • "JAMES."

  • Die Another Day (2002)

  • For his final stint as James Bond, Pierce Brosnan gave his best performance in the role

  • since his debut in GoldenEye.

  • "You've been busy, have we Mr. Bond?"

  • "Just surviving Mr. Chang.

  • Just surviving."

  • Perhaps he had the solid plot to thankwell, apart from that space laser bit.

  • The film successfully evoked the feel of classic Bond films with throwback imagery like Halle

  • Berry's Jinx emerging from the ocean.

  • And many of the action sequences were actually exciting, like the fight between Jinx and

  • Miranda Frost at the end of the film.

  • Unfortunately, Die Another Day's special effects do not always hold up.

  • Live and Let Die (1973)

  • This movie's main flaws revolve around the unimpressive main villain Mr. Big and his

  • plot to give away free heroin in order to get a corner on the market.

  • Despite this, it's still an adequate entry in the franchise, and Jane Seymour as Solitaire

  • remains one of the best Bond girls to date.

  • Quantum of Solace (2008)

  • Daniel Craig's second outing as James Bond suffers some fundamental flaws, like the villain

  • Dominic Greene and his plot to monopolize Bolivia's fresh water supplies.

  • That's a pretty boring idea for an international caper.

  • On the other hand, it's also a pretty dark film, with Bond set on revenge and not a tongue-in-cheek

  • quip in sight.

  • Olga Kurylenko is great as a Bond girl, and the inferno fight in the final act is the

  • stuff of nightmares.

  • Spectre (2015)

  • In this installment, we finally get to see our hero come face to face with Blofeld, the

  • leader of the shadowy organization SPECTRE.

  • That might've been exciting in an of itself, but at times, the film's plot seems a little

  • contrived.

  • That said, the action and stunt sequences rose to new heights without relying on computer-generated

  • imagery, and Monica Bellucci is delightful as a Bond Girl.

  • So, it's still definitely worth your time.

  • Moonraker (1979)

  • This installment of the Bond franchise features one of the most unrealistic plots of all.

  • A spacecraft is hijacked in order to release a deadly chemical around the world, and Roger

  • Moore's portrayal slips from merely flippant to positively silly.

  • There's still a lot to like about Moonraker because the campiness is cheerful, and the

  • cast does sell the silliness.

  • Fans also applauded the return of Jaws, and the romantic epilogue will still go down as

  • containing one of the best Bond double-entendres in history.

  • "007."

  • "My God what's Bond doing?"

  • "I think he's attempting re-entry sir."

  • Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

  • Sean Connery's return to the Bond fold in Diamonds Are Forever didn't sparkle quite

  • as much as its predecessors.

  • The '70s-era Vegas scenery seems a little too garish for Bond, and the movie ignores

  • much of the source material.

  • However, there are a few great chase scenes and the badass bodyguards Bambi and Thumper,

  • so there's a lot to like about the pic, too.

  • For Your Eyes Only (1981)

  • Director John Glen delivered a delightfully stripped-down Bond film with For Your Eyes

  • Only.

  • It approaches the feel of the earliest Bond movies, and Moore gives his most serious and

  • rugged performance yet.

  • The return to a Cold War threat was a smart move, as was the decision to nix any large

  • and overly bombastic set pieces.

  • What remains is an action-packed and smartly shot movie that does have its flaws, but is

  • definitely an enjoyable Bond film nonetheless.

  • The Living Daylights (1987)

  • When Timothy Dalton stepped into the role after Moore, critics seemed to miss his predecessor's

  • campiness and complained about him being too uptight.

  • Part of what helps keep James Bond films entertaining is the sardonic tongue-in-cheek wit displayed

  • by Bond himself.

  • Nevertheless, Dalton is backed up by good supporting performances, and the plot isn't

  • as outlandish as most, centering on the KGB and a tale of defection and smuggling.

  • Add in a few good action scenes, and The Living Daylights redeems itself as a better-than-average

  • Bond film.

  • Never Say Never Again (1983)

  • Even though the story of Never Say Never Again is mostly rehashed from Thunderball, there's

  • something about this movie that's more entertaining than the original.

  • Max von Sydow delivers a wonderful performance as Blofeld, and Rowan Atkinson is nervously

  • hilarious as Bond's handler at the British Consulate.

  • It's comforting to see a more experienced Sean Connery back in the role he made famous,

  • and he's clearly more comfortable and having more fun in his final farewell to the Bond

  • franchise.

  • "Never... Never say never again."

  • The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)

  • Even though it's not a great Bond film, Roger Moore started to hit his stride as the lead

  • character in his third attempt, The Spy Who Loved Me.

  • His onscreen chemistry with Barbara Bach's Anya is undeniable, and the film opens with

  • a great stunt sequence.

  • While the main villain and his dastardly plans for world domination are rather lackluster,

  • The Spy Who Loved Me does introduce audiences to one of the all-time greatest Bond henchmen:

  • Richard Kiel's Jaws.

  • All in all, it's a good entry in the franchise, and perhaps Moore's best outing as James Bond.

  • Licence to Kill (1989)

  • In Timothy Dalton's secondand finalperformance as James Bond, the filmmakers opted to play

  • to his strengths, resulting in a much darker and more violent Bond film.

  • While there are definitely a few preposterous momentslike capturing an airplane with

  • a helicopteron the whole, Licence to Kill is also much more sensible than most

  • Bond movies.

  • Like all good Bond films, Licence to Kill has plenty of entertaining action scenes,

  • and this time, there's also an entertaining plot to go along with them.

  • "Remember you're only President for life."

  • You Only Live Twice (1967)

  • Even though You