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  • The biopic Bohemian Rhapsody brings the story of Queen and Freddie Mercury to life on the

  • big screen, but how much of what you see in the movie is the band's real life and how

  • much is just fantasy?

  • Yippee-ki-yay, movie lovers, it's Jan here, and in this video I'm revealing the six biggest

  • differences between the Bohemian Rhapsody movie and the true story of Queen and their

  • charismatic frontman.

  • Keep watching to the end to find out how the movie changed Freddie Mercury's real-life

  • look and hit the bell to keep up-to-date with all my new videos.

  • According to the movie, Freddie Mercury, or Farrokh Bulsara as he was then, first met

  • Brian May and Roger Taylor after seeing them perform on stage with their band Smile.

  • That same night, Smile's lead singer Tim Staffell decided he'd had enough of the band going

  • nowhere and quit.

  • So, Mercury offered his own singing and song-writing services, and after a quick demo of his vocal

  • talents, May and Taylor agreed, laying the path for what would soon become Queen.

  • In reality, however, things happened rather differently as Freddie Mercury and Smile's

  • lead singer Tim Staffell were actually friends at Ealing Art College where they both studied,

  • and it was Staffell who introduced Mercury to Brian May and Roger Taylor in the late

  • 1960s.

  • Mercury was keen to be the band's lead singer, so when Staffell left Smile in 1970, Mercury

  • was perfectly positioned to take over.

  • The filmmakers probably went for a more condensed version of how Queen got together as they

  • didn't want to spend too much time on the band's build-up but instead focus on their

  • years as a group.

  • By the way, Tim Staffell actually got back together with May and Taylor to re-record

  • Smile's song 'Doing All Right' for the movie.

  • In the film, we see Queen's lead guitarist Brian May showing the rest of the band his

  • idea for the classic anthem We Will Rock You in a recording studio some time in 1980.

  • And soon after, Queen are shown playing the new song on stage at Madison Square Garden.

  • Now, while the band did perform We Will Rock You at that famous New York arena in 1980,

  • Brian May actually wrote the iconic song several years earlier and, in fact, it appeared on

  • Queen's album News of the World in 1977.

  • The most visually striking issue with this scene in the movie is that in reality when

  • Queen first performed We Will Rock You in 1977, Freddie Mercury didn't have a moustache

  • and had shoulder-length hair.

  • But because the film moves the song's composition to 1980, we see Mercury in the studio with

  • the short hair and moustache he sported from that time.

  • Much is made in the movie of how Mercury's desire for a solo career broke the band up.

  • However, back in the real world, according to Brian May, "[they] all tried to leave the

  • band more than once", and in fact, Mercury wasn't even the first member of Queen to release

  • a solo album, that was drummer Roger Taylor whose album Fun In Space came out in 1981.

  • And two years later in 1983, even though Queen did take a break from performing live, they

  • still recorded a new album together.

  • Also during that period Taylor made a second solo album and Brian May released a mini-album

  • too.

  • As for Mercury's solo offerings, he released a number of singles and two albums over the

  • years, including Barcelona and Mr Bad Guy.

  • In the movie, after the band agree to reunite for Live Aid, they say, "we haven't played

  • together in years; it's kind of suicide to play again for the first time in front of

  • millions".

  • In real life, that just wasn't the case as Live Aid took place in mid-July 1985 and Queen

  • had actually been on tour together from August 1984 to mid-May 1985 with their latest album,

  • The Works.

  • I imagine the filmmakers made this big change in order to raise the stakes for the band's

  • Live Aid performance and make their show-stealing set look less like a foregone conclusion and

  • more like an up-hill behind-the-scenes struggle.

  • One of the benefits of this change for real-life Queen is that it airbrushes out some controversial

  • moments in their history, such as performances in apartheid-era South Africa during a United

  • Nations boycott and a Musicians' Union ban.

  • I wouldn't expect to see something like that in an official biopic, but some reviewers

  • have criticised the film overall for feeling rather sanitised, probably due to the band's

  • heavy involvement as producers.

  • In another departure from reality, the film has Mercury finding out he has AIDS and telling

  • his bandmates about his illness shortly before Live Aid in mid-1985.

  • In the real world, Mercury was reportedly diagnosed with AIDS in 1987, two years after

  • Live Aid, and he told his bandmates sometime after that.

  • It seems like the filmmakers made this timeline change as they wanted to use the Live Aid

  • concert to frame the film and finish the movie on a huge high note for the band, while still

  • recognising some of what happened after that.

  • By bringing Mercury's diagnosis forward several years, the film deliberately dials up the

  • poignancy of both the lyrics he sang and his performance.

  • But the choice to cram so many events into one day, from Mercury tracking down his future

  • partner, to coming out to his parents, to performing at Live Aid, turns this sequence

  • into something of an exposition dump.

  • Prosthetic teeth, an artificial nose, and a whole variety of wigs and fake moustaches

  • were just some of the items used to help actor Rami Malek look like Freddie Mercury for the

  • movie.

  • One thing the film's make-up and hair department didn't use though was coloured contacts to

  • change Malek's light-coloured eyes to Mercury's dark ones.

  • It's perhaps a little odd that they didn't do that, so I wonder if Malek couldn't wear

  • them for some reason.

  • I remember Madonna saying the coloured contacts she wore for Evita were pretty uncomfortable

  • and hard to get used to, for example.

  • Or maybe the Bohemian Rhapsody filmmakers decided matching Mercury's eye colour wasn't

  • a big deal.

  • After all, the movie's hair & make-up designer has said, "You don't necessarily want them

  • to look exactly alike, but you do want to catch the essence of the person."

  • [Source: Jan Sewell, PopSugar] Either way, a difference in eye colour obviously

  • isn't as important as finding an actor who can bring Mercury to life convincingly on

  • screen; and Malek has certainly been getting great reviews for his role in the film.

  • So, what did you think of Bohemian Rhapsody?

  • Did any of these changes bother you and did you spot any others?

  • Tap left to watch another Bohemian Rhapsody video or tap right for another video you're

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  • Thanks for watching and see ya next time.

  • Yippee-ki-yay, movie lovers!

The biopic Bohemian Rhapsody brings the story of Queen and Freddie Mercury to life on the

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6 Ways Bohemian Rhapsody IGNORED Queen's TRUE STORY!

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/02/27
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