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  • 00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:02,510 JAKE KNAPP: Thank you guys for coming to our talk.

  • I know there's a lot of other amazing talks going

  • on at this moment right now at I/O. We almost

  • didn't come to this talk because there's so many good ones.

  • So super appreciate it.

  • We're going to talk to you guys today about design sprints.

  • And you actually totally scored by coming to this talk

  • because it's not just one talk, but two, two in one.

  • And first we're going to talk about design sprints

  • at Google Ventures with startups,

  • and then we're going to hear about designs

  • sprints at big Google.

  • So first of all Daniel and I are going

  • to talk to you about what we do at Google Ventures.

  • So Daniel and I are design partners at Google Ventures.

  • And we're going to tell you how to prototype and test

  • pretty much any product in just five days.

  • So Daniel take it away.

  • DANIEL BURKA: Well, before I even

  • get started I want to talk to you guys

  • about a problem I've got.

  • Unfortunately it's a really big problem.

  • In fact, it's a Super Mario scale problem,

  • a really big Super Mario scale problem.

  • I love Mario.

  • I have since it first came out.

  • And so you can imagine, this is going to date me a little bit,

  • but I was super excited when they announced the DS

  • and announced that they were making the new Super Mario

  • Brothers where you could become giant Mario.

  • And so at the time I was living in eastern Canada,

  • way off on the edge of the continent,

  • in a little place called Prince Edward Island where I grew up.

  • And I didn't have a whole lot of disposable income at the time,

  • but it was just after Christmas, and I

  • had gotten some cash gifts from some family.

  • And I was thinking, aw, you know,

  • I could totally get one of those things,

  • and it would be awesome.

  • I already had a little sneaking suspicion

  • that I had maybe a bit of an addiction problem with Mario,

  • but I decided, you know what?

  • Screw it.

  • I'm going to go get one anyway.

  • And so I drove up to this place called

  • the Future Shop in Charlotte Town.

  • I swear to God it's called the Future Shop.

  • It's like Best Buy.

  • And it was no less inviting in January

  • then as this photo, which I grabbed off Google Maps,

  • is now.

  • This is the actual shop, a real photo of it.

  • And so I went in there, and I threw down my hard earned

  • money.

  • And it was awesome.

  • It was just everything I imagined it would be.

  • So I played it.

  • And I played it a lot.

  • I played it every single day for about three months straight.

  • I beat every single level.

  • And then I beat every single level plus the secret levels,

  • then every single level plus the secret levels

  • with all the coins on every level.

  • And then on the DS you could have three different lives

  • per game.

  • And so I beat it once.

  • I beat it again.

  • And then I beat it again even faster.

  • And it was at the end of March.

  • And I was just about to reset the device so I could do it

  • three more times, and I was like, oh, fuck this.

  • And I put in a box, and I mailed it off my sister

  • in Los Angeles.

  • And I never saw the damn thin again.

  • But unfortunately I was out about $170

  • that I didn't really have to burn

  • and three months of my life.

  • I swear to God, I played hours of this game.

  • JAKE KNAPP: Well, to throw into sharp contrast what an idiot

  • Daniel is I want to tell you a story of my own.

  • And this also involves Nintendo.

  • This is from a simpler time.

  • So if you remember when Nintendo looked like this.

  • Raise your hand if you remember.

  • Oh, OK.

  • Awesome.

  • All right, great.

  • I'm glad that some of you are also old.

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • JAKE KNAPP: So my story takes place in the year 1986.

  • And it's actually a story about my wife

  • who was nine years old in 1986.

  • As was I, although I didn't know her at the time.

  • And like all nine year olds in the United States in 1986,

  • I don't know about Canada, but everyone wanted a Nintendo.

  • And this is what the Nintendo looked like.

  • It was a big box.

  • And everybody was so excited about it.

  • But it costs a lot of money.

  • So it cost $199, which if you adjust that for inflation it's

  • over $400.

  • It's a lot of money at any time if your nine years old.

  • Actually, Daniel, I don't know for you Canadians.

  • Hopefully this will help.

  • 00:03:45,304 --> 00:03:47,470 DANIEL BURKA: I have to deal with this all the time.

  • Thanks.

  • JAKE KNAPP: This is actually how much

  • maple syrup you can buy for $200 in case you guys were curious.

  • And leaders is spelled the Canadian way.

  • Craftsmanship here.

  • So anyway, my wife is very industrious.

  • And she scrimped and saved.

  • She did chores around the neighborhood,

  • and she saved up her allowance.

  • And finally, finally she had $200.

  • She was ready to make the purchase.

  • And then right at the last minute she got cold feet.

  • She was like, oh my gosh, I saved up all this money,

  • I don't know if I should do this, I'm only nine years old.

  • I don't know if she thought that, but she wasn't sure.

  • And so she made this really unusual arrangement that for $4

  • she would rent a Nintendo from her neighbor.

  • And she'd have it all day Saturday, all day Sunday.

  • She could play it as much as she wanted, all the games, you

  • know, the laser gun, everything.

  • And I think that what my wife envisioned

  • was something like this.

  • So this is a photo from Nintendo on the box at the time.

  • And this is kind of like captures

  • the scene of excitement that everyone had about Nintendo.

  • If you look closely at these brothers

  • you'll notice that they don't even

  • seem to notice Super Mario Brothers is actually

  • a one player game.

  • But that's what it was like.

  • I mean, it was so great.

  • And so she pictured this, and she

  • pictured the family gathered, and everybody,

  • you know, watching her play.

  • And the reality was more like this.

  • And this is not a photo.

  • This is an artist's interpretation

  • that my wife was really excited about when she saw it.

  • But this is what it was like.

  • She's up till 3:00, 4:00 AM, you know, eyes bloodshot,

  • barely sleeping, playing Nintendo the entire time.

  • And by the end of the weekend when she gave the Nintendo back

  • she realized I cannot handle owning a Nintendo.

  • And she came to this realization after just $4

  • and 48 hours of her time.

  • This idea of renting before you buy we think also

  • applies to product development.

  • And that's the essence of what we're

  • going to talk to you about today.

  • DANIEL BURKA: So the way that we typically

  • see design and development done at startups

  • is that you come up with an idea, a hypothesis,

  • something that might be really great for your product.

  • And then you build the lightest weight version of it

  • that you can, you know a simple V1.

  • You really boil it down.

  • Launch it into the wild, measure the results,

  • learn from those results, and then iterate around the circle.

  • Also from our experience this is actually not a great way

  • to operate as a startup.

  • And what really happens in the real world is

  • you frequently are starting with a bad idea.

  • And that's fine.

  • I mean, that's the whole point of a hypothesis

  • is something you're not sure of that you want to test.

  • But then you spend a lot of time actually building out

  • that idea, and this invariably takes

  • much longer than you think it will.

  • You've now invested the time, and so you